Video Emerges From Scene Of Charlotte Police Shooting Of Keith Scott

As officials in Charlotte, N.C., consider when, if, and how to release video of the police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott earlier this week, lawyers for the family have released what they say is eyewitness video taken by Scott's wife.On the cellphone footage that was first published by NBC, The New York Times, and other news outlets, Rakeyia Scott is heard pleading with her husband to be safe — and for the police not to shoot him. The video doesn't give a complete version of the encounter on...
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GPB Features

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How To Heal A Dog's Mind?

When Regenia Brabham opened the back door of the two story family home she’s converted into an animal shelter, out came a pit bull named Stark. “He’s a sweetheart,” Brabham said as Stark bolted into the backyard of the shelter. “Macon-Bibb Animal Welfare found him in an abandoned building in downtown Macon.” Stark was a bait dog. His job was to lose to stronger dogs. He bears scars from that life including the largest one earned when his handlers tried to burn him to death. Regenia Brabham...
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GPB News

On this edition of “Two Way Street” we talk to the great Atlanta-based blues guitarist Tinsley Ellis. Creative Loafing just named him blues artist of the year, and some time back, Rolling Stone magazine said of his hard-driving guitar style that his “eloquence dazzles…he achieves pyrotechnics that rival the early Jeff Beck and Eric Clapton.” High praise, indeed!

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we prepare for the much-anticipated presidential debate this coming Monday. We discuss how candidates are preparing and what they hope to achieve in the first debate. Can Hillary Clinton steer away from policy and use this time to relate to viewers? Will Donald Trump play the role of disrupter or will he present himself as presidential?

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The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes writer Nicki Salcedo of Decaturish.com, music blogger Jordan Stepp, Georgia State University professor Hector Fernandez, and Jeff Breedlove, who is the communications director for DeKalb County commissioner Nancy Jester.

BREAKROOM TOPICS:

Brigadier General Robert Lee Scott was a boy from Waynesboro, Georgia who went on to become a World War II hero. He was an American fighter pilot who flew in the Himalayas, one of the most dangerous routes possible at the time. Scott became a household name by writing about his experiences in the book “God is My Copilot” and played a key role in the opening of the Museum of Aviation near Robins Air Force Base. But he was also a flawed person, according to biographer Robert Coram.

GPB Music

First Listen: Drive-By Truckers, 'American Band'

Drive-By Truckers has always been a political band. Even while Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley were writing goofy songs like "Buttholeville" and "Too Much Sex (Too Little Jesus)" two decades ago, they were also calling out Southern character and culture while embracing what they'd soon dub the "duality of the Southern thing." Home is home, for better or worse, but sometimes a home stuck in its ways needs a kick in the ass. It's a unique position for a rock band that writes catchy, foot...
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Election 2016

A Complete Guide To Early And Absentee Voting

What Does Early Voting Data Tell Us?For those who can't wait to get this election over with, there's good news — early voting is starting.The bad news: That only applies to you if you live in one of 37 states that offer some kind of early voting (in person, absentee or by mail) without an excuse needed.More than 1 in 3 people is expected to cast a ballot early this year. On Friday, voters in Minnesota and South Dakota can start turning in absentee ballots. On Saturday, they can do so in...
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U.S. Native American tribes and Canadian First Nations are banding together to "collectively challenge and resist" proposals to build more pipelines from tar sands in Alberta, Canada. At least 50 First Nations and tribes signed a treaty on Thursday at ceremonies held in Vancouver and Montreal.

Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump expanded his list of potential Supreme Court nominees Friday.

The new list consists of 10 more possible nominees, including a U.S. senator who has refused to endorse Trump.

Trump's additional list, coming just days before the first debate, suggests he wants to add diversity to his earlier all-white list of eight men and three women. The second list, like the first, consists of bedrock conservatives, many with records hostile to abortion rights, same-sex marriage, and federal regulations.

Movie remakes have not been setting the world on fire lately. The all-gal Ghostbusters will maybe break even. Ben-Hur and Tarzan each cost — and lost — a fortune. So what's Hollywood pushing this weekend? The Magnificent Seven, a remake of a remake — admittedly, one with a decent pedigree.

In Akira Kurosawa's Seven Samurai (1954), a pickup band of seven sword-wielding rōnin are hired by a Japanese farming village to protect it from bandits. Only three of them walked away at the end.

After a bitter primary battle that culminated with Ted Cruz being booed off the stage at the Republican National Convention, the Texas senator says he will vote for Donald Trump.

In a 741-word Facebook post Friday, Cruz wrote that he made the decision because he wants to "keep his word" to vote for the Republican nominee and because he finds Hillary Clinton "wholly unacceptable."

As officials in Charlotte, N.C., consider when, if, and how to release video of the police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott earlier this week, lawyers for the family have released what they say is eyewitness video taken by Scott's wife.

When Harry Selker was working as a cardiologist in the 1970s, clot-busting drugs were showing great promise against heart attacks. But their life-saving properties were very time sensitive. "If you give it within the first hour it has a 47 percent reduction of mortality; if you wait another hour, it has a 28 percent reduction; another hour, 23 percent. And people were taking about 90 minutes to make that decision," he recalls. "So they were losing the opportunity to save patients' lives."

It was 1995. Bill Clinton was president. His wife Hillary had been through a bruising political defeat after leading a charge to reform health care. And Forrest Gump won the Academy Award for Best Picture.

Bob Boilen, the host of NPR Music's All Songs Considered podcast, sits down with John Paul White, formerly half of the Civil Wars, to discuss songs that changed the songwriter's life. The conversation takes place at the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville, and is part of AmericanaFest 2016.

Dirty Projectors' early career opened a virtual fire hydrant of ideas: albums overstuffed with sound and chaos, reined in by real artistry, released in rapid succession. But as bandleader David Longstreth honed his vision, the hydrant's flow has given way to a trickle. It's been more than four years since the last new Dirty Projectors album, Swing Lo Magellan, and Longstreth himself has stayed largely out of the public eye.

Congratulations are in order, kind of, for a few exemplary researchers and one massive multinational corporation.

This year's Ig Nobel awards — the rather-less-noble-than-the-Nobel awards for "improbable" research and accomplishments — were announced Thursday night.

The honorees included a man who lived as a goat, a man who lived as a badger, a man who put tiny pants on rats and tracked their sex lives, a team who investigated the personalities of rocks, and Volkswagen.

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