The Anti-Trump 'Resistance' Tries To Rebuild After Stinging Georgia Loss

Some activists in Georgia were having flashbacks. "It's like reliving November, right?" said Georgia resident Jessica Zeigler about Democrat Jon Ossoff's loss to Republican Karen Handel in the state's closely watched special election last week. The 32-year-old works in the medical-device industry, but she spent the last few months also volunteering with the Georgia chapter of Indivisible, a liberal political movement that tried to boost Democratic newcomer Ossoff to a win. "[We were] feeling...

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Footie Mob Unites Soccer Fans With Atlanta Music

Atlanta’s new MLS team plays Saturday before its seventh straight sold-out home crowd. Atlanta United hosts the Colorado Rapids Saturday at 7 p.m. at Bobby Dodd Stadium, the team's temporary home until Mercedes-Benz Stadium opens in August.

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Senate Health Care Bill Hangs In The Balance As 5 Lawmakers Waver

Updated at 6 p.m. ET June 23
Nevada Sen. Dean Heller on Friday became the latest GOP lawmaker to voice concerns about the Senate health care bill — a development that further complicates Republican efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. "I cannot support a piece of legislation that takes away insurance from tens of millions of Americans and hundreds of thousands of Nevadans," Heller said at a news conference back in Nevada. It was a stunning indictment of his own party...

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After Pricy Campaign, Karen Handel To Be Sworn In Monday

2 minutes ago
David Goldman / AP Photo

Karen Handel is set to be sworn in after her victory in Georgia's 6th Congressional District.

Handel's swearing-in ceremony is planned for Monday evening at the U.S. Capitol. Handel is the first female Republican to be elected to a congressional seat in Georgia.

She defeated Democrat Jon Ossoff last Tuesday in the most expensive congressional election in history, with spending expected to top $50 million. Handel, a former Georgia secretary of state, ultimately won about 52 percent of the vote according to unofficial returns in the historically conservative district.

First, walking might be good for your health, but maybe not so good for your safety. Last year, 236 pedestrians were killed in Georgia. That’s a 40% increase in just two years. We discuss this with Sally Flocks, President and CEO of PEDS, which advocates for pedestrian safety in Georgia.

State Concludes Doctor-Sex Abuse Study With Brief Statement

26 minutes ago
Richard Watkins

Georgia has concluded a year-long review of physician sexual misconduct cases brought to light by an Atlanta newspaper with a plan to educate doctors.

The state's plan focuses on educating doctors, rather than seeking new patient protections as some states have done, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

David Goldman / The Associated Press

President Trump has accused the news media of not covering terrorist attacks adequately. New research from Georgia State University shows the president is partially right. Researchers find there is a systematic bias in the way terrorism is covered, and an attacker’s identity can have an impact on coverage.

Transportation for America / Foter

Walking might be good for your health, but maybe not so good for your safety. Last year, 236 pedestrians were killed in Georgia. That’s a 40 percent increase in just two years. We discuss this with Sally Flocks, President and CEO of PEDS, which advocates for pedestrian safety in Georgia.

GPB Music

Young Thug, Big Boi And 2 Chainz Channel Atlanta's History Of Transmutation

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VDLDVPV8kDE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZI8SmvwTqMw Just when it seems Atlanta's done all it can to decimate rap's beloved traditions, someone hops out of bounds again, crosses another line, slaughters a sacred cow. No one act from the city embodies this ethos more than Young Thug. He made a name for himself spitting incoherent lyrics with inconceivable flows — yips, yelps, gurgles and growls — that made it impossible to tune him out. While his...

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The 45th President

What Would Human Resources Do? Some Advice For Trump As He Recruits And Staffs Up

Moments into his highly anticipated on-camera briefing Wednesday — the first after a seven-day absence — Trump press secretary Sean Spicer was asked about the persistent rumor that he will soon transition into a new role within the White House communications team — one that removes him from the spotlight and into a less visible position. He opted for an indirect response to a very direct question: "I'm still here." But, he added, "It's no secret we've had a couple of vacancies including our...

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The U.S. Supreme Court says it will re-hear a case that asks whether immigrants detained by the government have a right to a bond hearing to challenge their indefinite detention.

The case was argued in November 2016, months before Justice Neil Gorsuch filled the vacant seat of late Justice Antonin Scalia.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In an unusual move, the Supreme Court announced its decision to hear the Trump administration's travel ban cases from the bench. The Court merged the two cases and granted the stay applications in part. The Court will hear the cases in October.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Cholera Hitches A Ride On The Backs Of Soft-Shell Turtles

1 hour ago

You can catch cholera from drinking contaminated water.

You can catch it from raw or undercooked shellfish.

And you can catch it from soft-shell turtles.

That's the finding of a study published earlier this month by scientists at the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. And it's a particular concern in China and many other countries in East Asia, where turtle meat is often used in stews and soups.

Can the family of a slain Mexican teenager sue the federal agent who shot him across the U.S.-Mexico border for damages? The U.S. Supreme Court did not answer this question on Monday, instead opting to send a case back to a lower court.

The case centers on a larger question: whether the Constitution extends protection to an individual who is killed on foreign soil, even though that person is standing just a few yards outside the United States.

The Supreme Court says it will decide the fate of President Trump's revised travel ban, agreeing to hear arguments over immigration cases that were filed in federal courts in Hawaii and Maryland, and allowing parts of the ban that's now been on hold since March to take effect.

The justices removed the lower courts' injunctions against the ban "with respect to foreign nationals who lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States," narrowing the scope of two injunctions that had put the ban in limbo.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that taxpayer-funded grants for playgrounds available to nonprofits under a state program could not be denied to a school run by a church.

"The consequence is, in all likelihood, a few extra scraped knees. But the exclusion of Trinity Lutheran from a public benefit for which it is otherwise qualified, solely because it is a church, is odious to our Constitution all the same, and cannot stand," Justice John Roberts wrote for the majority.

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