Supreme Court Upholds Hurricane Katrina Fraud Verdict Against State Farm

The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld a jury verdict finding that State Farm Fire and Casualty Co. defrauded the federal government after Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in 2005.In the years before the hurricane, State Farm issued both federal government-backed flood insurance policies and general homeowners policies. After the hurricane, the company ordered its claims adjusters to misclassify wind damage as flood damage to shift liability to the government and spare the insurance company's...
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GPB Features

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Rep. Price Eyes Future Of Health Care In Trump Admin

In 45 days, Donald Trump will become the 45th president of the United States. One of the top priorities of that administration is to repeal and replace Obamacare. The man who will be at the forefront of that is Georgia Congressman Tom Price. President-elect Trump has nominated him as the next secretary of Health and Human Services. We talk with Georgia Health News editor Andy Miller about what changes Georgians can expect with their health coverage.
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President-Elect Trump

'Time' Magazine Names Donald Trump Person Of The Year

Time magazine has named President-elect Donald Trump as the 2016 Person of the Year, a title Trump called "a tremendous honor" in an interview on the Today show.Trump was selected from a shortlist that included prior winners Mark Zuckerberg and Vladimir Putin, as well as first-time candidates the Flint water crisis whistleblowers and Beyoncé Knowles.Previous winners include Pope Francis and Pope John Paul II, groundbreaking scientists and groups or archetypes such as "the protester" and ...
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Soul-singer Otis Redding is known for a number of unforgettable tracks. But one song is considered to be his biggest hit: "(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay."    

Richard Bitting / Flickr

A new study from the University of Georgia links colorful, plant-based foods to increased brain activity in older adults. The research used functional MRI technology to determine the benefits of foods like kale and squash.

Lead researcher Cutter Lindbergh joins us to talk about how the connection can boost long-term, cognitive health.

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The food scene in Athens, Georgia is experiencing explosive growth. Restaurants like Five And Ten and The National have put the small city on the culinary map.

GBI Says Thousands Of Rape Kits Await Testing

20 hours ago

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation says more than 4,200 rape kits containing evidence from sexual assault cases statewide await testing.

A report this month says the agency also has evidence from more than 5,400 cases that occurred before 1999 and will determine if DNA analysis is still needed.

A new state law prompted this month's report. The law was intended to speed up testing of rape kits following reports of sexual assault.

We talk with bassist and songwriter Stanley Clarke, who boasts a career spanning 40 years and work on over 40 albums. The four-time Grammy Award winner was the backbone of jazz-fusion band Return To Forever in the 1970s. His most recent album, “The Stanley Clarke Band: UP,” was released in 2014, with a new version of his hit tune “School Days.” Clarke is now on tour, and performs at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta Thursday at 8 p.m. 

GPB Music

Photo courtesy of Stanley Clarke

Bassist Stanley Clarke On Slapping The Strings For 40 Years

Bassist and songwriter Stanley Clarke boasts a career spanning 40 years and work on over 40 albums. The four-time Grammy Award winner was the backbone of jazz-fusion band Return To Forever in the 1970s. His most recent album “The Stanley Clarke Band: UP” was released in 2014, with a new version of his hit tune “School Days.” Clarke is now on tour, and performs at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta Thursday at 8 p.m. He joins us for a conversation about his life and contribution to the bass...
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Post-Election

Reporter's Notebook: What It Was Like As A Muslim To Cover The Election

Editor's note: There is language in this piece that some will find offensive.Sometime in early 2016 between a Trump rally in New Hampshire, where a burly man shouted something at me about being Muslim, and a series of particularly vitriolic tweets that included some combination of "raghead," "terrorist," "bitch" and "jihadi," I went into my editor's office and wept.I cried for the first (but not the last) time this campaign season.Through tears, I told her that if I had known my sheer...
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Four New Programs to Debut on GPB Radio

As a valued GPB listener, we want you to know about some upcoming changes to our program schedule. Beginning in January 2017 listeners of GPB radio stations outside of Atlanta and Athens will regularly hear On Point with Tom Ashbrook, Here & Now with Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, Nightcap with GPB’s Sarah Zaslaw, and Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street Radio (see program descriptions below). GPB will also expand Political Rewind to three days a week.
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The 59th Annual Grammy nominees were announced Tuesday morning, and while familiar names appeared among the five Latin music categories, there were also some nice surprises.

The fire and feel Lucinda Williams brought to the Lincoln Center stage when she headlined this August concert is informed by 25 years of making music. Deeply informed by tradition, her work remains determinedly individualistic and envelope-pushing.

Tai Boxley needs a hysterectomy. The 34-year-old single mother has uterine prolapse, a condition that occurs when the muscles and ligaments supporting the uterus weaken, causing severe pain, bleeding and urine leakage.

Boxley and her 13-year-old son have health insurance through her job as an administrative assistant in Tulsa, Okla. But the plan has a deductible of $5,000 apiece, and Boxley's doctor said he won't do the surgery until she prepays her share of the cost.

A magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck off the coast of Indonesia around 5 a.m. local time on Wednesday, killing nearly 100 people.

The death toll is expected to rise as rescue and recovery efforts continue, NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports.

The quake was at a relatively shallow depth, just 11 miles under the Earth's surface, Anthony says. Its epicenter was on the coast of Aceh province, the same region where an earthquake triggered a devastating tsunami in 2004.

No tsunami warning has been issued following Wednesday's quake. Aftershocks continue to shake the region.

The Department of Labor has guidelines for companies that want to keep unpaid interns. Essentially, unpaid interns have to be treated like students and shouldn't do the work of paid employees.

Those rules, however, don't apply to government agencies.

Every December, Miami's annual Art Basel fair draws artists, dealers and buyers from around the world. This year, dozens of artists could be found not in galleries or at cocktail parties, but painting at an elementary school.

Spanish painter Marina Capdevila was one of more than 30 artists working at Eneida Hartner Elementary School in Miami's Wynwood neighborhood.

In central Damascus, it's perfectly clear that President Bashar Assad is firmly in control. In the souks of the Old City, his face looks out of almost every shop window, pinned up next to gold jewelry or intricate rugs. No one has a bad word to say about him, at least not to a Western journalist.

In rebel enclaves nearby, forces loyal to Assad are creeping back into control. After years of siege tactics, opposition forces in the suburbs of Damascus are increasingly making deals which see their fighters heading into rebel-held areas.

He was a flamboyant, alpha-male billionaire who said things no career politician ever would — someone who promised to use his business savvy to reform the system and bring back jobs. Voters believed that his great wealth insulated him from corruption, because he couldn't be bought.

But his administration was marked by criminal investigations and crony capitalism.

We like to think our brains can make rational decisions — but maybe they can't.

The way risks are presented can change the way we respond, says best-selling author Michael Lewis. In his new book, The Undoing Project, Lewis tells the story of Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky, two Israeli psychologists who made some surprising discoveries about the way people make decisions. Along the way, they also founded an entire branch of psychology called behavioral economics.

Amazon says it is opening a new food and convenience store that doesn't have a checkout line.

Instead, the company envisions customers at the Amazon Go store picking up whatever they want off the shelves — then simply walking out with it. The items are automatically billed to their Amazon accounts.

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