5 Questions After A Chaotic Week In The Trump White House

What a week it was for Donald Trump. As if everyone didn't know this already — Donald Trump is governing just the way he campaigned. He's a one-man band with an impulsive, seat-of-the-pants management style. As his former rival Jeb Bush correctly predicted way back in the primaries, he's the " chaos candidate " and now the "chaos president." While it's too soon to subscribe to some of the hyperventilating headlines about a "crisis" in the West Wing, there's no doubt Trump's has been the most...

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GPB Features

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Immigration In Trump's America

Today on “Political Rewind,” we take a deep dive into immigration issues, something that touches the lives and businesses of more Georgians than you might realize.

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GPB News

On today’s show we talk to two singer-songwriters who are part of the rich community of musical artists who live and work in Nashville – one of the great music mecca’s of this country.

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Today on “Political Rewind,” we are one month into the Trump administration and for members of the American media, it’s been a very rocky road so far. From Steve Bannon’s declaration that the media are the “opposition party” to yesterday’s unorthodox presidential press briefing, the disconnect is very real and very apparent. 

Sean Powers and Olivia Reingold / On Second Thought

Since we did our show live from Savannah for the Savannah Book Festival, we organized a special edition of The Breakroom featuring all authors. The panel included Alejandro Danois, Karin Slaughter, Nicki Salcedo, and Mike Lowery.

 

BREAKROOM TOPICS:

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A new education bill sponsored by Republican Rep. Kevin Tanner would allow the state to provide systems of support and assistance for low-performing schools in Georgia.

One of the featured authors at the festival is Forbes Financial Columnist John Tamny, who is author of the book “Who Needs the Fed?” We take a look at the role of the fed, and ask Tamny about how it may change in the Trump administration. The Fed also will see some big changes this month in Atlanta, as the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta steps down.

 

 

GPB Music

Clyde Stubblefield, James Brown's Funky Drummer, Dies At 73

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5DTznu-9v0 Clyde Stubblefield, the funk drummer whose work with James Brown made him one of the most sampled musicians in history, died Saturday morning in Madison, Wisc., his publicist confirmed. Stubblefield was 73; his publicist did not provide a cause of death. For most of his career, Stubblefield was better known in sound than in name. He joined James Brown's backing band in 1965, one of countless musicians on an ever-rotating roster. As he told NPR in...

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Black History Month

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Black Music: The Voices Of Cultural And Social Change

One of the ways African-Americans have shared the pain and the pleasure of the black experience is through music. Black artists have been an essential part of almost every genre of music. And black songs are often catalysts for change and enhanced public awareness.

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Trump's First 100 Days

DeVos Spars With Teachers, Trump On Autism And More Education Stories Of The Week

With Secretary Betsy DeVos rolling up her sleeves at the Education Department and, at one point this week, joining Donald Trump at the White House to talk with educators and parents, Washington, D.C., is making a lot of education news these days. For those of you struggling to keep up, the NPR Ed Team is trying something new: a weekly recap of the latest national education news. Editor's Note: This story was updated Saturday afternoon to reflect DeVos' interview with Townhall and the...

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Rio de Janeiro's carnival is like one of those lavish parties where all the guests show up early and start guzzling away while you're still upstairs, trimming your eyebrows.

Is there another city on earth that tosses aside its troubles with such gusto, and then dives into the dressing-up box with all the wild-eyed relish of The Cat in the Hat?

The carnival hasn't even officially opened, but this weekend several hundred thousand people were already out parading and partying beneath a steaming tropical sun.

If you are a fan of sketch comedy, then you'd probably know the name Jordan Peele. He, along with Keegan Michael Key wrote and performed in the acclaimed Comedy Central sketch series Key & Peele. The show, which ran for five seasons, earned a Peabody Award and two Primetime Emmys for its hilarious and deeply pointed take on race and culture.

A popular feature among the sketches on Key & Peele was the way it sometimes mixed humor and horror For example, the zombies who refused to eat black people.

Growing up on Long Island, Zachary Linderer was obsessed with science.

He grew up a Jehovah's Witness, and like many others in the faith, he was homeschooled his whole life. By the time he got to high school, Linderer knew that he wanted to go to college for something in the sciences: physics, oceanography, something in that realm. But he realized at a young age that wasn't going to be a possibility.

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At a rally in New York City's Times Square on Sunday, protesters filled three city blocks to express solidarity with Muslims. The crowd gathered to speak out against President Trump's executive order — now on hold after a unanimous federal appeals court decision — banning immigration from seven predominantly Muslim countries.

It has been three-quarters of a century since President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. The order, issued just over two months after Japan's surprise attack at Pearl Harbor, gave the U.S. military the ability to designate areas "from which any or all persons may be excluded."

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