Sure, There's A Health Care Deal. That Doesn't Mean It Can Pass

Updated at 3:55 p.m. ET A bipartisan coalition of 24 senators — 12 Republicans and 12 Democrats — has signed on to health care legislation to prop up the individual insurance market and keep premiums down. With the expected support of all Senate Democrats, it could have the votes to pass the chamber. But questions remain over when it might actually get a vote, as well as whether President Trump and House Republicans would bring the bill over the finish line. "This is a first step: Improve it,...

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Administration Sends Mixed Signals On State Health Insurance Waivers

It was the Friday before a Monday deadline, and federal health officials in Washington, D.C., were working feverishly with their counterparts in Oklahoma to finalize the details of a new state reinsurance program. Emails flew between the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in Washington and Oklahoma's Department of Health. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Oklahoma, the only ACA insurer in the state, was on board . Everything had to be done by Monday, Sept. 25, so the insurance company could...

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GPB Features

David Goldman / AP Photo/File

Atlanta Pride Parade Attracts Mayoral And Gubernatorial Candidates

On today's "Political Rewind," we take a closer look at just what President Trump’s executive orders on health care really mean for assuring quality insurance coverage. Who are the winners and losers in the deal? How will it affect Georgians? Andy Miller of "Georgia Health News" helps illuminate the issues.

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GPB News

Charlottesville, Killer Mike, Colin Mochrie

"On Second Thought" is celebrating its third anniversary this week. The show launched its first broadcast on GPB on October 20, 2014. To celebrate three amazing years, we’re re-airing our best segments in a two part broadcast. Here are the best picks for today:

This week on "Two Way Street," we're listening back to three of our conversations with some of the bravest, most inventive women to ever step into our studio: writers Molly Brodak and Melissa Febos, and robotics engineer Ayanna Howard.

Charlottesville, Killer Mike, Colin Mochrie

This week "On Second Thought" celebrates three years on the air. The show launched October 20, 2014. To celebrate, we’re re-airing a few of our best segments. Do you have a favorite segment or episode? Let us know.

Actor George Takei first came to fame as a young Sulu in the original Star Trek series. But he’s since become an active voice in promoting equal rights for LGBT people. We spoke to Takei earlier this year when the play “Allegiance,” was showing in Atlanta movie theaters. The play is inspired by Takei’s experiences in a U.S. internment camp during World War II.

kennesaw.edu

On today's Political Rewind, the national debate over athletes and the national anthem lands on the football field at Kennesaw State University. Does newly released evidence show that political pressure shut down protesting cheerleaders? Also, a high level Stacey Abrams campaign official appears on Russian media that is part of the FBI's investigation of organizations that tried to influence last year's presidential election. We also discuss the feud between the president and the family of a fallen U.S. serviceman.

Panelists:

David Goldman / AP Photo

A powerful lawmaker texted a Georgia sheriff, boasting how they pressured a university president to take action after black cheerleaders knelt during the national anthem at a football game.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution obtained the text messages under Georgia's open records act.

Kennesaw State University cheerleaders were told they'd be kept off field during pregame activities after five knelt to protest racial injustice at a game Sept. 30.

GPB Music

Sean Powers / University of Missouri

Photos From Atlanta's 2017 AfroPunk Music Festival

The annual AfroPunk music festival returned to Atlanta, attracting thousands of concertgoers. The celebration of innovation in the music and fashion world began in 2005 in Brooklyn, and has morphed into an international celebration in other major cities, like London and Paris. P roducers Jeff Harris and Sean Powers documented the festival.

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Las Vegas Shooting

Mandalay Bay Security Guard Breaks His Silence

Mandalay Bay security guard Jesus Campos spoke for the first time publicly about his experience the night a gunman killed 58 people at a country music festival in Las Vegas. Campos, who was the first person to confront the killer, had remained largely out of the public eye. Here & Now s Robin Young speaks with KNPR reporter  Casey Morell  ( @csymrl ) about Camposs public statement and the latest in the investigation. Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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California Wildfires

Why Older People Didn't Fare Well In Northern California Wildfires

The night before the fire overtook LeRoy and Donna Halbur, the couple had dinner at their home north of Santa Rosa, Calif. , with their eldest son, Dave, his wife and their 2-year-old son. Dave Halbur remembers it as a typical Sunday dinner with his folks. We "had Chinese food and talked. It was a really nice evening," Halbur recalls. The fire came through a few hours later in the early morning darkness. By Monday, Dave Halbur had heard nothing from his parents. LeRoy and Donna Halbur were...

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Puerto Rico Recovery

Puerto Rican Students Head To The Mainland For School

It's not exactly how Deilanis Santana planned to spend her 13th birthday: waking up before dawn, packing up her life – and heading to Connecticut to live with her grandma. But here she is at Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport in San Juan, three weeks after Hurricane Maria, waiting anxiously like many other Puerto Ricans for flights to destinations like Miami, Philadelphia, and other cities. The gates are crowded with children — Deilanis among them — leaving their homes, and sometimes...

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The 45th President

Emoluments Hearing Hints At What May Be At Stake: Trump's Tax Returns

If there's one thing President Trump's critics want from him, and he refuses to give up, it's his tax returns. The returns didn't come up during Wednesday's hearing in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York in Manhattan. But the hearing was the first step in a process that could loosen Trump's grip on them. If the next step goes the plaintiffs' way, the case could make the president's tax returns surface. Trump is being sued by four plaintiffs who allege he is violating...

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Senate Republicans passed a $4 trillion budget blueprint late Thursday by a narrow 51-49 vote, with Kentucky's Sen. Rand Paul joining Democrats in opposing the measure considered a key step in forward on President Trump's promises of a tax overhaul.

The White House praised the bill, saying it "creates a pathway to unleash the potential of the American economy through tax reform and tax cuts."

Taylor Swift Pines Hard For A Pretty Face On 'Gorgeous'

2 hours ago

Teased early Thursday with three caption-less Instagram posts, "Gorgeous" arrived just before midnight, finding Swift in more traditional pop territory than the previous releases from her upcoming sixth studio album Reputation, due Nov. 10.

Former President Obama returned to the campaign trail for the first time since leaving office Thursday campaigning for the Democratic candidates for governor in New Jersey and Virginia.

He put the Virginia race, where he was campaigning for Ralph Northam, in the starkest terms.

"We need you to take this seriously, because our democracy is at stake," Obama told a crowd of 7,500 at a packed convention center, "and it's at stake right here in Virginia."

Advisory: The above video and below language almost certainly contains content that some may find offensive.

The Los Angeles Police Department is investigating Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein after an Italian model-actress alleged that he raped her at her hotel in 2013.

As NPR's Mandalit Del Barco reports, "A spokesman for the LAPD says the department is interviewing a 'potential victim' of sexual assault by Harvey Weinstein in 2013."

The allegations of sexual assault are the first reported in Los Angeles. Police in New York and London are investigating allegations that Weinstein sexually assaulted five women in those cities.

Another toddler has reportedly been crushed to death by an unsecured Ikea dresser, after the furniture giant recalled millions of chests and dressers over the risk of deadly tip-over accidents.

Jozef Dudek, 2, died in May, according to lawyers for his family, when he was crushed by an Ikea Malm dresser in his parents' room after he was put down for a nap.

Exposure to polluted air, water and soil caused nine million premature deaths in 2015, according to a report published Thursday in The Lancet.

The causes of death vary — cancer, lung disease, heart disease. The report links them to pollution, drawing upon previous studies that show how pollution is tied to a wider range of diseases than previously thought.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

White House chief of staff John Kelly says he was stunned and brokenhearted hearing criticism of President Trump's calls to grieving parents this week.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

This winter is going to be a warm one for the majority of the United States, according to forecasters at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center.

They say that the La Niña weather pattern is likely to develop. That means "greater-than-average snowfall around the Great Lakes and in the northern Rockies, with less-than-average snowfall throughout the Mid-Atlantic region," Mike Halpert of the Climate Prediction Center said in a forecast Thursday.

Taliban militants wiped out almost an entire Afghan Army base in Afghanistan's Kandahar province, leaving just two Afghan soldiers there uninjured. This brings the week's toll to more than 120 people killed by the militant group.

The attack, which started late Wednesday, killed at least 43 Afghan soldiers and wounded nine, reporter Jennifer Glasse in Kabul tells our Newscast unit.

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