GPB Features

What The Democratic Loss in Georgia Means For The Midterms

Defeat is an orphan. Summing up the left's response to its deflating loss in a special congressional election in the Atlanta suburbs were two reactions: 1. Jim Dean, chairman of the progressive activist group Democracy For America, in a statement: "Defeating Republicans in districts that they have traditionally held requires doing something drastically different than establishment Democrats have done before — specifically, running on a bold progressive vision and investing heavily in direct...

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Heavy Rains And Flooding As Tropical Storm Cindy Makes Landfall

Some coastal areas in Texas and Louisiana are under a tropical storm warning and forecasters are warning of potential heavy flooding as Tropical Storm Cindy moved inland from the Gulf of Mexico Thursday morning. Severe weather and flooding has already been reported over the last two days along the Gulf Coast. The storm made landfall early Thursday morning near the Texas/Louisiana border, according to the National Hurricane Center . The center predicts the storm will diminish to a tropical...

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Ryan Myers

All this week, we get additions to the essential Georgia Playlist from musicians playing at AthFest over the weekend, June 23-25. Today’s picks come from Thomas Johnson, guitarist for Athens indie group Futurebirds. He adds some tunes from Star Room Boys and Now It's Overhead.

Futurebirds perform at AthFest on the Main Stage this Friday at 9 p.m.

Today, we revisit our conversation with musician Kishi Bashi. He was raised in Virginia, but has lived in Athens since 2011 when he started playing with the band Of Montreal. We spoke to him just before his concert at the Variety Playhouse last fall. He is up for "Best Album of the Year" at the Flagpole Music Awards tonight in Athens.

John Bazemore / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” Karen Handel emerges victorious in the 6th District. Our panel recaps the election and its outcome. What does it bode for the 2018 midterm elections? President Trump takes a victory lap on Twitter over the GOP win.

Matt Rourke / AP Photo

June is Elder Abuse Awareness Month. The recently published America’s Health Rankings Senior Report finds the state now ranks 41st in the nation for senior health, down two spots from last year. We talk about the state of our elder care system with Kathy Floyd, Executive Director for the Georgia Council on Aging. And Glenn Ostir, Director of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Georgia.

On Set In Georgia

23 hours ago
Chuck Zlotnick / Columbia Pictures

From the next installments of the Avengers series to a new Godzilla flick, there are a lot of major productions currently filming in Georgia. Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Jennifer Brett gave us an update about the latest blockbusters in the state.

GPB Music

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What Gucci Mane Means To Atlanta

Atlanta-based rapper Gucci Mane got out of prison last year. A month later, he released a new album and headlined at the Fox Theatre.

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The 45th President

Trump Administration Faces Pressure To Not Deport Detained Iraqi Christians

Immigration authorities have rounded up nearly 200 Iraqis in recent weeks, and the Trump administration is now under heavy pressure to hold off moves to deport them. Many of those currently detained are from the minority Chaldean Christian community, which faces severe persecution in Iraq. U.S. immigration authorities say the detained Iraqis have criminal records, but their families and supporters say many have already served time or paid their fines and that they would face persecution if...

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After Georgia Win, A Triumphant Trump Returns To Campaign Trail In Iowa

Still basking in the glow of a big Georgia special election victory for the GOP, President Trump pushed aside the controversies that have hamstrung his administration in the past month and returned to the stage most comfortable to him — the campaign trail. "All we do is win, win, win!" he told the crowd gathered in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Wednesday night. It was classic campaign Trump throughout his hour-plus stemwinder, decrying the "phony witch hunts going against me," hitting the "dishonest...

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Shades Of Gray Turn Sumptuous In 'Chain Letter'

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It's nice to see Farel Dalrymple flying again. Pop Gun War, the serial comic he wrote back in the early 2000s, revolved around Sinclair, a young boy who got a pair of wings that let him soar through an urban dreamscape — a city known only as "The City." Though grungy and often sad, The City was full of quirky possibilities. A dwarf in a tux and top hat grew taller than the skyscrapers. A large, floating, bespectacled goldfish hung around. A lonely man labeled everything in his apartment, even his own pants, "because people don't always know what things are."

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A sinewy, grayish, vaguely human thing sits on the ice cap somewhere in the Arctic, before plunging into the water below. That's when a very unfortunate whaling vessel arrives and harpoons a whale, setting the thing on a rampage. It won't take long for readers put the pieces together: The creature is the Monster — as in Frankenstein's monster — and his encounter with the whaling ship sets him on a mission to destroy, pitting him against the humanity that rejected him centuries ago.

Social media companies are under pressure to block terrorist activity on their sites, and Facebook recently detailed new measures, including using artificial intelligence, to tackle the problem.

The measures are designed to identify terrorist content like recruitment and propaganda as early as possible in an effort to keep people safe, says Monika Bickert, the company's director of global policy management.

Jeon Chung-won tends sheep on the hilly farm where he was born in PyeongChang, a rural county a few hours' drive east of South Korea's capital Seoul.

"It's a simple, peaceful place where the mountain air hugs you," says Jeon, 32. "I really love this place."

Only a handful of domestic tourists typically come to PyeongChang, to hike green hills dotted with Buddhist temples or visit a small ski station nearby. But that is about to change.

Steven Somsen's farm got a new addition last year, breaking up fields of wheat and soybeans that span as far as the eye can see from his rural North Dakota home.

"We ended up with some towers on our property," he says, nodding toward the giant, spinning, white wind turbines dotting the farmland around his house.

Xcel Energy, a Midwest-based utility, installed three on his land, among the 100 turbines placed near his remote community of Courtenay.

Iraq's military said ISIS destroyed the 12th century al-Nuri mosque in Mosul's Old City, where ISIS fighters remain, on Wednesday.

The Great Mosque of al-Nuri, a medieval mosque with the tall, leaning al-Hadba minaret, was the site where ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi made a rare public appearance and, in July 2014, declared the group's "caliphate" in Iraq and Syria.

Seventeen-year-old Nabra Hassanen was buried Wednesday after a funeral service packed with mourners. The service was held in the Northern Virginia community where she'd lived. An evening vigil organized by her high school's Muslim Student Association also drew throngs of people.

Hassanen was beaten and killed early Sunday morning as she walked back to her mosque after a pre-dawn meal with friends. Such meals are common during the month of Ramadan, when many Muslims fast from dawn to sundown.

Eye-popping. That's the word that comes to mind when you hear how many viruses are likely hiding out around the world in animals.

"We expect there are hundreds of thousands of mammalian viruses out there," says Kevin Olival, a disease ecologist at EcoHealth Alliance, who led the study.

Really? Hundreds of thousands?

"Yes, it's likely," Olival says. "Any given mammal species is likely to have 20, 30 or even 100 viruses. When you add that up around the planet, you get a big number."

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