Trump Hints At A Limit On Federal Aid To Puerto Rico; San Juan Mayor Responds

"We cannot keep FEMA, the Military & the First Responders" in Puerto Rico "forever," President Trump said Thursday, hinting at a possible limit on federal aid to the island territory where 3.4 million Americans have struggled to recover from two destructive hurricanes. Here are the president's comments on the issue, compressed from three consecutive tweets : "'Puerto Rico survived the Hurricanes, now a financial crisis looms largely of their own making.' says Sharyl Attkisson. A total lack of...

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Las Vegas Shooting

After Las Vegas Massacre, Victims Search For Their Heroes Of The Night

On that Sunday night in Las Vegas, Elle Gargano was listening to country music at the Route 91 Harvest Festival when she was shot in the back of the head. Her friend got her under the stage at the concert to protect her and fellow concertgoers helped get Elle over the fence and out of the festival grounds. "They ran toward the street and they hailed somebody going by in a car, a man and a woman and they stopped them," Elle's father Mike Gargano said in the chapel of the Spring Valley Hospital...

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GPB Features

J. David Ake / AP Photo/File

US Supreme Court To Hear Tri-State Water Wars Case

The Supreme Court says it will hear a decades-long dispute between Florida and Georgia over water rights. The justices on Tuesday issued a brief order in a lawsuit that Florida filed at the high court challenging water use by its neighbor. The court set not set a date for arguments in the case. A lawyer appointed by the court to oversee the suit recommended that the justices side with Georgia. Florida has objected to the lawyer's recommendation. The states' battle over water use dates back to...

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GPB News

MSO

After four decades playing music for Middle Georgia, the Macon Symphony Orchestra is bringing down the curtain for good. It gives its final performance Saturday, a program called "A Fond Farewell."

Bob Veto, board chair of the Macon Symphony, joins Sarah Zaslaw to explain the decision to close up shop and the impulse behind the sendoff concert.

Interview Highlights

On the Macon Symphony’s special financial circumstances

We've heard from over 200 musicians, scientists, and other creative-types in the more than three years that "Two Way Street" has been on the air. Today, we're checking in on what three of our most interesting guests are up to now: record-setting swimmer Diana Nyad, singer-songwriter Radney Foster, and Tony-winning director Kenny Leon

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

We spend the full hour exploring how journalism is changing in the age of President Trump. Host Celeste Headlee recently led a panel discussion on how journalism has changed in the time of the Trump administration, presented by the Columbia Journalism Review. 

Parents of disabled students and a group of advocates say in a federal lawsuit that Georgia schools have put thousands of children into a separate program and failed to give them an adequate education.

The Georgia Advocacy Office and other groups said in a statement that they filed the lawsuit this week in the northern district of Georgia's federal courts.

The complaint alleges that the students have been segregated into a program known as the Georgia Network for Educational and Therapeutic Support, or GNETS.

On this edition of Political Rewind, will Georgia legislators proceed with plans to expand gun rights in the aftermath of the Las Vegas massacre?  We’re getting our first clues now.  Plus, new signals that state GOP leaders may be dropping their longtime resistance to investing in public transit.

GPB Music

Rounder Records

Friends Of Gregg Allman Reflect On His Final Record 'Southern Blood'

Before Gregg Allman passed away this summer, he recorded an album packed with new material. The posthumously released “Southern Blood” came out earlier this month. The heart-shattering album reflects on Allman's life as his terminal illness overtook him. We listen to the record and talk with Allman's longtime friend Chank Middleton and Allman's guitarist and band leader Scott Sharrard. We also hear from Allman's producer, Don Was.

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Puerto Rico Recovery

The Monumental Task Of Reopening Puerto Rico's Schools

The schools in Puerto Rico are facing massive challenges. All the public schools are without electricity, and more than half don't have water. More than 100 are still functioning as shelters. But Puerto Rico's secretary of education, Julia Keleher, tells us that the schools that are open are serving as connection points for communities. They've become a place where children and their families can eat a hot meal and get some emotional support, too. On Wednesday, we reported on two schools that...

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The 45th President

Insults, Lawsuits And Broken Rules: How Trump Built A California Golf Course

Editor's Note: This story includes language that may be offensive to some readers. When Donald Trump arrived in Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif., in 2002, he was welcomed as a "white knight," says former City Councilman Tom Long. Trump bought a golf course there that had gone bankrupt after the 18th hole literally fell into the ocean in a landslide. Long, a Democrat, says residents looked forward to Trump's promises of repairing the course and generating revenue and attention for the city. Despite...

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On Second Thought is a one-hour, daily news talk show, airing at 9 a.m. weekdays. Timely, pegged conversations about all topics relating to Georgia and Atlanta, includ…

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Featured Podcast

Harper Lee and Chuck Reece

Feb 21, 2015

    

A look at Southern culture – the good and the bad:

Readers everywhere are eager to see the new book by Harper Lee, the Pulitzer-prize winning author of To Kill a Mockingbird. We talk with Melita Easters, the Atlanta writer who wrote a one-woman play about Harper Lee’s life who shares with us little-known stories about the gifted but reclusive author.

Love = Chocolate and Great Food!

Feb 14, 2015

Food and romance are inextricably linked, and so our Valentines weekend special features conversations with two stars of the Georgia food world.

Kristin Hard makes some of the finest chocolates anywhere. She knows the business from cultivating and fermenting the seeds of cacao trees to creating unique flavor profiles.

Ebola Ethics

Nov 8, 2014

Host Bill Nigut talks with Dr. Paul Wolpe, Director of the Center for Ethics at Emory University. Wolpe is a bio-ethicist who looks at ethics in the practice of medicine. The conversation focuses on ethical and moral considerations surrounding the prevention and treatment of Ebola. For example, Zmapp, a potentially life-saving Ebola drug has been in such short supply a very limited number of patients can receive the drug. Who should get it? Who should not? What are the factors that weigh into that decision?

Bill Nigut hosts guests who tell stories of strong, courageous women in real life and in the world of fiction. First up is author and historian Karen Abbott.Her new non-fiction book "Liar, Soldier, Temptress, Spy" tells the story of four women who defied their gender-based roles to fight in the Civil War, one by posing as a man to fight as a solider, the others spying against the enemy.

This week, TWS focuses on two of Georgia's most dynamic entrepreneurs. Clark Howard and Jeff Hilimire.

A Conversation With Krista Bremer, Author Of My Accidental Jihad:

Atlanta's Power Financial Couple Jeff Sprecher & Kelly Loefler have become the highest profile married couple in Atlanta. He is the Atlanta businessman who made and won an audacious bid to buy the NY Stock Exchange. She works with him in the business but is also a principal owner of the WNBA Atlanta Dream.

Bull Durham and Factory Man

Sep 6, 2014

Bull Durham: From Film To Broadway-Bound Musical:
Released in 1988, Ron Shelton wrote and directed what many film organizations call one of the greatest sports movies, Bull Durham. He could have chosen any region of the country to tell his baseball story, but Shelton set the scene in the South. The reason, Shelton says, is because of his Southern roots.

 

 

Segment 1&2: During her 13 years as obituaries editor of the Atlanta Constitution Kay Powell developed a wide following for her ability to uncover unexpected, moving and often funny details about the lives of the ordinary people who were the subjects of most of her obits. Kay says her job was to write personality profiles – it just happens the people she wrote about were all dead. She shares wonderful stories about her career.

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