For CDC, Reducing Flu Spread Takes Priority Over Nuclear Attack Preparedness

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has postponed a planned Tuesday session on nuclear attack preparedness, deciding instead to focus the workshop on influenza. The agency announced the switch in topics late Friday, citing the spike in flu cases as the reason for the pivot. "To date, this influenza season is notable for the sheer volume of flu that most of the United States is seeing at the same time which can stress health systems," according to a CDC statement. "The vast majority...

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GPB Features

Stephen Fowler, GPB News

Vince Dooley On UGA National Championship Game: 'Somehow, Someway, One More Time'

Former University of Georgia football coach Vince Dooley has been an important part of the school’s history and legacy for more than 50 years. He coached the Bulldogs to their last national championship in 1980, defeating Notre Dame in the Sugar Bowl. We visited Dooley at his Athens home to see some of his favorite memorabilia from that season.

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GPB News

JIM MELVIN / CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

For a while, Purple Ribbon Sugarcane thrived on Sapelo Island, off the Georgia coast. Then, disease nearly wiped it out altogether in North America, but it’s been brought back, thanks to a team of farmers, geneticists, and historians.

  •  Winter Weather Headed Our Way
  • Sen. Perdue Defends President Trump
  • Sen. Isakson Proposed Peace Corp Health Care Upgrade

LA Johnson / NPR

Last week, a federal judge temporarily halted the Trump administration's plan to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. It’s unclear if legislative efforts to extend the program will be successful. Under DACA, some 800,000 young immigrants, often referred to as "Dreamers," can legally live and work in the U.S. One of those Dreamers is Valentina Emilia Garcia Gonzalez, who moved from Uruguay to Gwinnett County, Georgia.

Today's headlines:

  • Winter weather heading to North Georgia and Metro Atlanta
  • David Perdue denies Trump's derogatory comments towards African countries
  • UGA's Roquan Smith declares for the NFL Draft

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Monday, January 15, 2018 would have been Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 89th birthday. His legacy remains strong. Nearly a decade after his death in 1968, President Jimmy Carter awarded Dr. King the posthumous Presidential Medal of Freedom. Producer Sean Powers takes us back to that day at the White House with an audio postcard.

GPB Music

Dust To Digital

The Remarkable Lost Story of Gospel Artist Washington Phillips

Gospel musician Washington Phillips has been shrouded in mystery for decades. The Texas-based artist recorded only 18 songs in the 1920s, which were lost to obscurity until recently. Atlanta-based Dust-to-Digital revived his music into a new collection called “Washington Phillips and His Manzarene Dreams.” That release was nominated for a Grammy Award.

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The 45th President

Trump Denies Using Vulgar Slur; Top Democrat Says He Said It

Updated at 7:37 p.m. ET President Trump is denying reports, from NPR and other news outlets, that in a Thursday meeting at the White House he disparaged African nations as "shithole countries" and questioned why the United States would admit immigrants from them and other nations, like Haiti. Trump told lawmakers that the U.S. should instead seek out more immigrants from countries like Norway. A White House statement issued Thursday notably did not deny that Trump used the vulgarity to refer...

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Food Stamp Program Makes Fresh Produce More Affordable

8 hours ago

Rebeca Gonzalez grew up eating artichokes from her grandmother's farm in the central Mexican state of Tlaxcala. But for years after emigrating to the U.S., she did not feed them to her own kids because the spiky, fibrous vegetables were too expensive on this side of the border.

When she prepared meals at her family's home in Garden Grove, Calif., Gonzalez would also omit avocados, a staple of Mexican cuisine that are often costly here.

Grammy Award-winning singer Edwin Hawkins died on Monday at his home in Pleasanton, Calif.

His publicist Bill Carpenter told news organizations that the cause was pancreatic cancer. Hawkins was 74.

A native of Oakland, Hawkins had been performing with his family and in church groups since he was a boy. In the late 1960s, when Hawkins was in his 20s, he helped form the Northern California State Youth Choir. The group recorded its first album, Let Us Go Into the House of the Lord.

Updated at 8:40 a.m. ET

Pope Francis, arriving in Chile to begin a three-day visit, opened his trip by asking for forgiveness over a local priest-abuse scandal that has left the country reeling — and prompted a less-than-warm reception for the Argentine-born pontiff.

Updated at 6:55 a.m. ET

A Southern California couple are in custody after one of their daughters called 911 and led authorities to their home, where 12 of her siblings were inside, including "several children shackled to their beds with chains and padlocks in dark and foul-smelling surroundings."

Our airwaves are filled with debates about immigrants and refugees. Who should be in the United States, who shouldn't, and who should decide?

These modern debates often draw upon our ideas about past waves of immigration. We sometimes assume that earlier generations of newcomers quickly learned English and integrated into American society. But historian Maria Cristina Garcia says these ideas are often false.

Dolores O'Riordan of the Irish rock band The Cranberries died on Monday at 46. The vocalist became internationally known in '90s with her band's hits such as "Linger," "Dreams" and "Zombie." Jim Sullivan a former, longtime music critic for The Boston Globe, remembers her life, music and legacy.

Who can say why some gimmicks take off and others flop? But the Google Arts & Culture app tapped into the zeitgeist over the weekend, until it seemed like just about everyone with access to a camera phone and a social media account was seeking and sharing their famous painting doppelganger.

In 1968, 1,300 black men from the Memphis Department of Public Works went on strike after a malfunctioning truck crushed two garbage collectors to death.

The strike led to marches with demonstrators carrying signs declaring "I Am A Man." Their organizing efforts drew support from the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. before his assassination.

Updated at 1:40 a.m. ET Tuesday

Some members of the Trump administration started off the holiday honoring Martin Luther King Jr. at a wreath-laying ceremony at the civil rights leader's memorial in Washington Monday. But the president's first stop was his own golf club.

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