For CDC, Reducing Flu Spread Takes Priority Over Nuclear Attack Preparedness

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has postponed a planned Tuesday session on nuclear attack preparedness, deciding instead to focus the workshop on influenza. The agency announced the switch in topics late Friday, citing the spike in flu cases as the reason for the pivot. "To date, this influenza season is notable for the sheer volume of flu that most of the United States is seeing at the same time which can stress health systems," according to a CDC statement. "The vast majority...

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GPB Features

Stephen Fowler, GPB News

Vince Dooley On UGA National Championship Game: 'Somehow, Someway, One More Time'

Former University of Georgia football coach Vince Dooley has been an important part of the school’s history and legacy for more than 50 years. He coached the Bulldogs to their last national championship in 1980, defeating Notre Dame in the Sugar Bowl. We visited Dooley at his Athens home to see some of his favorite memorabilia from that season.

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GPB News

Today's headlines:

  • Winter weather heading to North Georgia and Metro Atlanta
  • David Perdue denies Trump's derogatory comments towards African countries
  • UGA's Roquan Smith declares for the NFL Draft

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Monday, January 15, 2018 would have been Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 89th birthday. His legacy remains strong. Nearly a decade after his death in 1968, President Jimmy Carter awarded Dr. King the posthumous Presidential Medal of Freedom. Producer Sean Powers takes us back to that day at the White House with an audio postcard.

On this edition of Political Rewind, we talk with Dr. Meria Carstarphen, the Superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools.  We’ll look at how she’s rebuilding a school system rocked by a scandal that made national headlines before her arrival and we’ll ask her to weigh in on the impact that state education policies championed by Governor Deal and Trump administration proposals are having on public schools.  Plus, we’ll access the impact of the vulgar remarks President Trump allegedly made about immigrants from Haiti, El Salvador and some African countries.

  •  Fake Checks In Marietta
  • Gwinnett County Commission Sued
  • Falcons Face Eagles

  •  Sen. Perdue On Immigration
  • Mayor's New Transition Team
  • Falcons Vs. Eagles

GPB Music

Dust To Digital

The Remarkable Lost Story of Gospel Artist Washington Phillips

Gospel musician Washington Phillips has been shrouded in mystery for decades. The Texas-based artist recorded only 18 songs in the 1920s, which were lost to obscurity until recently. Atlanta-based Dust-to-Digital revived his music into a new collection called “Washington Phillips and His Manzarene Dreams.” That release was nominated for a Grammy Award.

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The 45th President

Trump Denies Using Vulgar Slur; Top Democrat Says He Said It

Updated at 7:37 p.m. ET President Trump is denying reports, from NPR and other news outlets, that in a Thursday meeting at the White House he disparaged African nations as "shithole countries" and questioned why the United States would admit immigrants from them and other nations, like Haiti. Trump told lawmakers that the U.S. should instead seek out more immigrants from countries like Norway. A White House statement issued Thursday notably did not deny that Trump used the vulgarity to refer...

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The Personal Toll Of Civil Rights Activism

19 hours ago

The fight for civil rights has always been hard work. It takes a toll on the mind and the body.

And the struggle continues today, 50 years after the death of Martin Luther King Jr.

Every generation has their crusaders: the big names we know, and untold thousands of others whose support makes these movements possible. Who exactly are the new activists and what battles are they fighting? And how do they stay in the fight?

GUESTS

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has postponed a planned Tuesday session on nuclear attack preparedness, deciding instead to focus the workshop on influenza.

The agency announced the switch in topics late Friday, citing the spike in flu cases as the reason for the pivot.

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET.

Dolores O'Riordan, the lead singer of the Irish band The Cranberries, has died suddenly at age 46.

O'Riordan defined the sound of The Cranberries — with hit songs like "Linger," "Salvation" and "Zombie." She brought a particularly Irish inflection to pop charts around the world, particularly in the 1990s.

Her publicist confirmed that O'Riordan died suddenly Monday in London, where she had been recording. No other information about her death was immediately available.

Altering A Species: Darwin's Shopping List

20 hours ago

By genetically modifying organisms, we can now create glow-in-the-dark cats and fish, mice with singing voices, less flatulent cows, carbon-capturing plants,

When you sell 40 million records and enjoy the kind of crossover appeal Black Eyed Peas have, it usually comes at the cost of street cred. But in "Street Livin'," a dark, haunting new visual, the hip-hop group trades pop success for political commentary on the systemic ills plaguing the streets today.

In 1545, people in the Mexican highlands starting dying in enormous numbers. People infected with the disease bled and vomited before they died. Many had red spots on their skin.

It was one of the most devastating epidemics in human history. The 1545 outbreak, and a second wave in 1576, killed an estimated 7 million to 17 million people and contributed to the destruction of the Aztec Empire.

But identifying the pathogen responsible for the carnage has been difficult for scientists because infectious diseases leave behind very little archaeological evidence.

We're lucky to have a lot of remarkably talented artists deliver impressive performances here at World Cafe (ok, humblebrag). But our whole team was pretty floored by Lizz Wright. The combination of Wright and her band (Bobby Ray Sparks on organ, Brannen Temple on drums and Chris McQueen on guitar) was effortless and elevated, in a way that's hard to articulate in words, but you can experience in a session here.

Protesting Through Poetry

Jan 15, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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What are the different ways that Americans protest? Our co-host Rachel Martin has been asking.

RACHEL MARTIN, BYLINE: Here's Martin Luther King Jr. in 1955 in Montgomery, Ala.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Copyright 2018 WBAA Classical. To see more, visit WBAA Classical.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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