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"Is anyone going to come through here?"

That's what a Hilton hotel employee asked one of a dozen photographers along the red carpet at the White House Correspondents' Association Dinner a couple of hours before the event officially started Saturday evening. But, like a blood-thirsty mosquito on a sweltering night, it was the nagging, persistent thought that seemed to plague attendees throughout the event.

The reason: the vacuum left by the absence of President Donald Trump who had decided to spend his 100th day in office rallying with supporters in Pennsylvania.

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When U.S. forces captured Saddam Hussein back in 2003, they sent CIA analyst John Nixon to interrogate him. Nixon is now retired, and has written a book called Debriefing the President, about his interrogation of Saddam and other adventures in the spy trade.

Since Nixon has done both briefing and debriefing, we'll see how much he knows about underwear briefs. Click the listen link above to hear how he does.

There are few artists in the music business that have had the kind of career Bill Anderson has had. He wrote his first number one hit at age 19 while working as a disc jockey in Commerce, Georgia back in 1957; and since then he has placed 80 singles on the country music charts, 37 of them in the top ten. He’s been voted BMI Country Songwriter of the Year six times. He is a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame, the Georgia Music Hall of Fame, and has been a member of the Grand Ole Opry for five decades.

Reading The Game: Stardew Valley

16 hours ago

For years now, some of the best, wildest, most moving or revealing stories we've been telling ourselves have come not from books, movies or TV, but from video games. So we're running an occasional series, Reading The Game, in which we take a look at some of these games from a literary perspective.

Dear Sugar Radio is a weekly podcast from member station WBUR. Hosts Steve Almond and Cheryl Strayed offer "radical empathy" and advice on everything from relationships and parenthood to dealing with drug problems or anxiety.

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Every month, we at NPR Music convene a panel of hosts and music directors from the public-radio family across the country. Their objective: to share the new songs they simply can't get enough of. Some of our panelists delight in the surprise of a well-established band's latest offering; others shine a spotlight on a younger, local artist on the verge of breaking out nationally. Either way, it's a singular opportunity to discover something new.

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If you're the kind of person who opens the paper in the morning and goes straight to the obituaries, we've got good news for you: There's a new documentary out this week that follows the staff writers of the New York Times obituary desk. It's called Obit.

In a time when most types of government spending are under attack, a few brave souls have stepped up to defend those perpetually endangered hillocks of federally funded refinement, the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities. The defenders haven't always managed so well.

When Wanuri Kahiu took to the TED Fellows stage this week in Vancouver, the 36-year-old had on green shoes and a beaded necklace worn like a crown — a hint to her offbeat worldview.

In 1966 Bridgewater State Hospital for the Criminally Insane gave filmmaker Frederick Wiseman unprecedented access. Wiseman documented staff at the Massachusetts hospital herding patients, often heavily drugged and naked, through bare rooms and corridors.

The resulting documentary, Titicut Follies, shook up the medium and launched Wiseman's innovative, Oscar-winning career. A ballet adaptation of the film premieres in New York Friday night.

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It was supposed to be an exclusive luxury music festival on a tropical island. Instead it became a target of ridicule and a social media feeding frenzy.

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Perhaps you're a person who buys festival wear but finds Coachella too plebian. Perhaps you find other music festivals off-putting because you can't bring your own yacht. Or maybe you just think it sounds awesome to hang out on an island in the Bahamas and you have a few thousand dollars to blow.

Sheryl Crow's brand-new album, out Friday, is inspired by the spirit of her big hits from the '90s. Be Myself is a return to her roots in rock 'n' roll, after she made a big change and went country in 2013. She says she found a different set of rules apply to promoting a country record:

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The Circle, the film based on the novel by Dave Eggers, presents a dystopian view of the direction Silicon Valley is taking the world. And, as a longtime Silicon Valley correspondent, I have to say there is a lot that this comic and spooky film gets right.

Last week brought a flurry of news about a new batch of unreleased Prince songs — six, to be exact, culled from sessions the late star had recorded between 2006 and 2008 — most of which remain unreleased after Prince's estate obtained an injunction blocking their distribution.

The musical mastermind and human frontman of Gorillaz, Damon Albarn, started writing Humanz more than a year ago, before Donald Trump was the Republican nominee for President.

In 19th century Georgia, Princess Barbare Jorjadze grew up to be the country's first feminist. But until recently she's been best remembered for another accomplishment – her cookbook.

In 2009 PBS aired a documentary series with the ambitious goal of chronicling the various styles of music made by Latino musicians here in the U.S.

It was a daunting task for sure and they largely pulled it off. I mean, they had four hours to cover everything from accordions along the Texas-Mexican border to Afro Caribbean drums in New York. It was a fascinating experience watching it back then, even inspiring because of the music and the stories behind the music.

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