Arts & Culture

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The End

Oct 13, 2017

In this final round, contestants must endure an impending letter trend that portends the end: every answer contains the letters "E-N-D" in consecutive order.

Heard On Adam Conover: Adam Fixes Everything

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Mystery Guest

Oct 13, 2017

This episode's mystery guest, Steve Baldwin, leads an unusual tour through Brooklyn. Can you guess his secret before Jonathan and Ophira do?

Heard On Adam Conover: Adam Fixes Everything

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Monkee Business

Oct 13, 2017

This music parody quiz is exactly as fun as a barrel of Monkees! We rewrote Monkees songs to be about other zoo animals. Hey hey, we're the Giraffes!

Heard On Adam Conover: Adam Fixes Everything

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Spelling Bee Style

Oct 13, 2017

Way less A-W-K-W-A-R-D than your average middle school spelling bee. In this quiz, contestants need to identify a fashion label and then correctly spell the brand name.

Heard On Adam Conover: Adam Fixes Everything

Adam Conover: Adam Fixes Everything

Oct 13, 2017

Against his better judgment, comedian Adam Conover takes a shower every morning. As part of his lifelong quest to uncover the truth behind everyday assumptions, Conover learned something surprising about his daily habit. "The idea that you must bathe every day," he told host Ophira Eisenberg, "is, to a certain extent, a manufacture on the part of the soap industry." Eager to sell more products, companies promote the notion that showering less than once a day makes people unclean and unhealthy—despite evidence to the contrary.

Caller ID

Oct 13, 2017

In this audio quiz, we open up the Ask Me Another hotline to phone calls from TV and movie characters and musicians. After the famous callers say hello, contestants must answer questions about them.

Heard On Adam Conover: Adam Fixes Everything

Pre-K Education

Oct 13, 2017

For ages 3 and up: Every answer in this quiz will be something you learned in school, but we've changed one letter to a K. For example, the sequence of changes an organism goes through from birth to death, and the positive social media feedback it receives in the process would be the, "LIKE cycle," Changing one letter in "LIFE cycle" to a K.

Heard On Adam Conover: Adam Fixes Everything

In a scene of startling beauty in Ai Weiwei's Human Flow, a group of refugees huddles together, with light bouncing off golden insulation blankets handed out by workers to warm them up as they arrive off a boat in Europe. Ai's work is often meant to provoke, but the shot isn't meant to plunder suffering for art's sake. It's a moment of noticing, in a gorgeous-looking documentary that never spares us the ugly, unspeakable miseries of forced migration.

Advisory: The above video/song contains language that some may find offensive.

Way back in February, Lo Moon visited the WFUV studios in New York City and performed an unreleased song called "Thorns." We've been sitting on this stunning five and a half minutes ever since, waiting for the day the band chose to release the single. Eight months later, today is that day.

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Manipulation.

About Ali Velshi's TED Talk

Journalist Ali Velshi began his career to "speak truth to power." Now he worries that fake news has subverted the meaning of truth.

About Ali Velshi

Ian Brady killed five children in the 1960s, in an infamous case of depraved murder. Brady died five months ago, but arguments over disposing of his body only now seem to be over, with a U.K. court saying Brady will be cremated with "no music and no ceremony," rejecting a plan to play the "Witches' Sabbath" portion of Hector Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique.

It's not unusual for film composers to make music out of organic sounds found in or related to the movie. Take Nathan Johnson's stunning Looper score which was built on a foundation of sampled clicks and pops that captured the film's steampunk creakiness. Or, more elementally, the typewriter rhythms Mark Mothersbaugh used for his Royal Tenenbaums score, emulating the film's anachronistic storytelling themes.

Philip Pullman introduced readers to his alternate Oxford, full of magic and danger, in the His Dark Materials trilogy, beginning with 1995's The Golden Compass. The story of young Lyra Belacqua, her soul-companion Pantalaimon, and their battle against the oppressive forces of the quasi-religious Magisterium became a massive world-wide hit. Now, he's returning to that world in The Book of Dust, which will explore how Lyra came to live in Oxford.

Talk about building a buzz! Slingshot artist Lo Moon wowed us with its first single "Loveless" in September 2016. They let it percolate for a good eight months before unleashing its follow-up single, "This is It" in May. And today, they give us "Thorns" — the third single off a debut album to be released in early 2018. Suffice it to say, this is a new band that's taking time to get it right.

The War on Drugs' A Deeper Understanding is epic. Ambitious. Huge. Case in point: the first single they released, "Thinking of a Place," clocked in at over 11 minutes. But make no mistake – this isn't the work of a noodley jam band. Every sound is deliberate, every dynamic is thoughtful, and the build is brilliant. That's thanks in large part to the way lead singer and songwriter Adam Granduciel works.

Never mind ghosts and goblins, zombies and vampires.


Sayori Wada is a Tokyo-based illustrator. Her work can be found in and on shirts, newspapers and music videos.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A new comedy premieres Sunday on Showtime called "White Famous." It's the story of a black performer's struggle to succeed in Hollywood. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans reviews an exploration of race in Hollywood.

Dhani Harrison waited a long time to strike out on his own. After years of collaborating with others, the son of The Beatles' George Harrison just released a solo debut clearly influenced by his recent work as a composer. This was his first live radio appearance on the U.S. and a powerful session, particularly the single "All About Waiting."

The music of pianist and composer Abdullah Ibrahim conveys an extraordinary depth in stillness. More than perhaps any other improvising artist, he knows how to turn the solitary act of introspection into a communal experience that's both transporting and immersive.

When audiences watch a Jackie Chan movie, they know exactly what they're in for — lots of punching — but there's something that might surprise people about the actor. "I hate violence," Chan says. "But I make action films."

Updated at 2:30 a.m. ET

Roy Price, the head of Amazon Studios, has been put on leave following allegations published in The Hollywood Reporter that he sexually harassed a female producer for the series The Man in the High Castle.

The fall of Harvey Weinstein has been rapid in the week since The New York Times reported that he had been settling sexual harassment claims for decades. And as more women tell their stories of upsetting encounters with the powerful film executive, Weinstein's problems are moving beyond his now-tattered reputation to legal and financial troubles.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

A new play in New York centers on Palestinian militants who hid from the Israeli army for over a month in 2002 inside Bethlehem's Church of the Nativity. NPR's Neda Ulaby reports that "The Siege," not surprisingly, is controversial.

Our elders didn't warn us enough about the dangers of angry, selfish men, possibly because some of them were angry, selfish men themselves. So consider the films of writer-director Noah Baumbach to be an education. Baumbach has long delighted in mocking the egomaniacs in the art world, crafting biting dark comedies around minor figures with major attitudes. He's come closer than anyone to discovering just where the breaking point lies between talent, stature, and awful behavior.

In a hospital in the late 1950s, the wheeze and ca-chunk of the respirators sound like the inside of an Industrial Age factory, only the product being churned out is another few seconds of life. Compared to the elegant organism that is the healthy human body, the inflation and collapse of the pump is a tired accordion, and the hose connecting the machine to the patient's neck is bandaged and ungainly.

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