Arts & Culture

Ways to Connect

This is one of those things that's been on the Internet for a while and for whatever reason is only now making its way to my eyeballs. But now that I've seen it, I can't look away.

Note: This piece discusses the plot details from the sixth-season premiere of Veep.

Editor's note: For the best experience, view this 360˚ video in the YouTube app on your smartphone, using a VR viewer such as Google Cardboard.

Allan Holdsworth, Revered Fusion Guitarist, Dies At 70

Apr 17, 2017

Allan Holdsworth, a spellbinding guitarist who influenced generations of jazz and rock musicians with his innovative sound, has died unexpectedly at age 70.

No label, no careShamir just gifted us with a new album and it's already making Monday a whole lot brighter.

Hope was recorded over the weekend, a whirlwind attempt for the unclassifiable pop star to fall in love with music all over again.

These guys had me at their name.

Ever since I heard the first EP back in 2009 I've watched Chicano Batman grow, with a sound that perfectly captures dark lounges, quinceañera dances, car shows and backyard parties.

Lots of other folks have heard something in this music — since that debut the band has played some of the biggest outdoor music festivals for diverse crowds around the country.

Generations ago, the American Indian Osage tribe was compelled to move. Not for the first time, white settlers pushed them off their land in the 1800s. They made their new home in a rocky, infertile area in northeast Oklahoma in hopes that settlers would finally leave them alone.

As it turned out, the land they had chosen was rich in oil, and in the early 20th century, members of the tribe became spectacularly wealthy. They bought cars and built mansions; they made so much oil money that the government began appointing white guardians to "help" them spend it.

In California, an extremely wet winter put an end to the state's record-breaking drought. Heavy rainfall also produced welcome spring scenes — like replenished reservoirs and fields in bloom.

"It's a completely different look," says Justin Sullivan, a Getty Images photographer who took before-and-after style photos of drought-stricken areas. "It's just like a velvety green, lush landscape now — compared to just dry, brown, almost like a moonscape before."

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In the mid-1960s, Michael Nesmith was writing songs and working the Los Angeles club scene when someone showed him an ad: A new TV show was looking for people to audition. He did — and the next thing he knew, he was a Monkee.

What does it mean to be human? In Lidia Yuknavitch's new novel The Book of Joan, what's left of the human race is orbiting above the Earth, sexless and ageless, prisoners in a technological hell. Their lives are preserved through growing limbs and grafting skin. Presiding over it all is a one-time billionaire celebrity who evolved through media and technology into a despot.

When Forbes first listed the 400 richest Americans in 1982, there were 13 billionaires on that list.

Today, every single person on the Forbes 400 list is a billionaire.

Many have become philanthropists, and they are reshaping public policy, and society, as they see fit. And because of their numbers, they have far more influence than the philanthropists of the past, argues David Callahan, author of a new book on philanthropy, The Givers: Wealth, Power and Philanthropy in a New Gilded Age.

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Jeanne Galice's music reflects her global roots. She was born in France, but her father's job in the oil industry meant she and her family moved around a lot: to Dubai when Galice was 9, then to the Republic of the Congo, to Abu Dhabi and back to France. Now, the worldly pop singer — who goes by Jain when she's onstage — is on her first U.S. tour, for her album Zanaka.

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What will our dinners look like when temperatures and sea levels rise and water floods our coastal towns and cities?

Allie Wist, 29, an associate art director at Saveur magazine, attempts to answer that question in her latest art project, "Flooded." It's a fictional photo essay (based on real scientific data) about a dinner party menu at a time when climate change has significantly altered our diets.

A Strange Odyssey Through Bulgaria In 'Shadow Land'

Apr 16, 2017

In 2005, I read a book so suspenseful, so laden with longing that I could not put it down: The Historian, by Elizabeth Kostova. In 2010, her sophomore effort, The Swan Thieves, thrilled me slightly less, but made up for its lack of suspense with a delicate dance through the world of fine art. However, both novels lacked something else — a sense of grounding and purpose. I could sense it somewhere not far off, but it didn't yet exist.

The two people who are garnering much of Saturday Night Live's recent attention are not cast members.

According to Audrey Shafer, there is something profound in the moment a patient wakes up from surgery.

She would know — she's an anesthesiologist. She's responsible for people when they are at their most vulnerable: unconscious, unable to breathe on their own or even blink their eyes.

As a result, Shafer says, a kind of intimate trust forms between her and her patients. It's this closeness that moves her to write poetry about medicine.

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All right. Let's take a poetry break. It's time now for some more of your Twitter poems in honor of National Poetry Month. Here are two that deal with the old saying write what you know. This one is from Dionne Sims in Minneapolis, Minn.

Baby Or Bust: My Time Is Running Out

Apr 15, 2017

Dear Sugar Radio is a weekly podcast from member station WBUR. Hosts Steve Almond and Cheryl Strayed offer "radical empathy" and advice on everything from relationships and parenthood to dealing with drug problems or anxiety.

Here's today's dilemma. A 38-year-old woman is in a relationship with a 24-year-old man. Despite the large age gap, everything is going well — she says they have "real, serious, beautiful love" for each other.

Since the conclusion of 2016's competition last May, the Eurovision Song Contest has been mired in controversies both practical and political — but mostly a combination of the two.

Touchstone/Simon & Schuster; FDR Archives

This week marks the 72nd anniversary of the death and subsequent funeral of President Franklin Roosevelt. He died on April 12, 1945 at the Little White House in Warms Spring, Georgia; the funeral took place on April 15 in Washington D.C.

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A Tussle Over Wall Street Sculptures

Apr 15, 2017

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