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Michael Lionstar

“The Nix” is the debut novel by author Nathan Hill. It revolves around Samuel Andresen-Anderson, who finds a self-promoting reason to reunite with his mother after being abandoned as a child. She’s been accused of an unusual crime and Samuel gets hired to write a story. We talk with Nathan Hill ahead of an appearance at the Margaret Mitchell House on Monday night, May 22.

"Where the birds sing a pretty song..." Worry not — no spoilers ahead.

[It should be obvious, but there are loads of spoilers below from the first four episodes of Twin Peaks: The Return.]

In a year that has brought us some pretty trippy TV so far, Showtime's Twin Peaks revival has managed to uncork the weirdest, wildest, most unfathomable four hours of television I have seen this year on a major media outlet.

And for David Lynch fans, that's probably going to sound like heaven.

The contours of Pokey LaFarge's music have always evoked a time before he was born, but the here-and-now is center stage in the themes and messaging within.

Julia Jacklin doesn't need much accompaniment: If you were to hear the Australian singer-songwriter's unadorned voice, say, echoing at the top of a stairwell, you'd most likely climb to where it leads without a second thought. Jacklin's full-length debut, last year's Don't Let The Kids Win, knows just when and how to lean in to this simplicity, surrounding her with spare instrumentation that keeps that voice in the center of the frame.

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Joshua James' new album is called My Spirit Sister. Released a little over a decade into his career, it features staggering honesty — the kind of stuff that's difficult to say out loud, let alone sing. For example, James wrote the song "Millie" when his wife was pregnant with their second child and he was having severe doubts. "I really just had no idea how to cope with it," James says. "Should I just leave this gal with her mom and just depart and try to start again? What am I to do?"

The Station nightclub fire happened more than 14 years ago, and on Sunday, a memorial park was dedicated to the victims of the fire.

On Feb. 20, 2003, the rock band Great White was playing in the club in West Warwick, R.I., when pyrotechnics ignited flammable soundproofing foam. The building was quickly engulfed in flames.

In the end, 100 people were killed and more than 200 injured.

The effort to honor the victims of The Station nightclub fire with a memorial took more than a decade.

The music of the late Alice Coltrane Turiyasangitananda, the wife of the jazz giant John Coltrane, has always rested somewhat in the shadows. It didn't help that she gave her career up — to become a spiritual leader.

Dear Sugar Radio is a weekly podcast from member station WBUR. Hosts Steve Almond and Cheryl Strayed offer "radical empathy" and advice on everything from relationships and parenthood to dealing with drug problems or anxiety.

Today the Sugars are trying to help with an age-old dilemma. It's a choice between love and everything else.

When Vince Staples releases his sophomore album Big Fish Theory next month, he won't be the only lanky rapper from Long Beach, Calif. with new music in the marketplace. Big Uncle Snoop Dogg, whose solo debut Doggystyle dropped the same year Staples was born, released his 15th studio album this week. And like the title Neva Left not-so-subtly suggests, his ubiquitous industry presence over the last quarter century is unprecedented in hip-hop.

They're seemingly unavoidable on Instagram these days: photos of bright yellow egg yolks nestled in a fluffy bed of egg whites, like the sun framed by billowy clouds. They're called cloud eggs, and they're pretty enough to look like a taste of heaven ... which is probably why people are obsessively whipping them up and sharing their pictures on social media.

Yet the latest food fad du jour is actually a modern spin on a nearly 400-year-old recipe.

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Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is a basketball legend...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED SPORTSCASTER #1: Three NCAA championships at UCLA. Six NBA titles with Milwaukee and Los Angeles.

Here's Kareem, the sky hook.

Margot Sanchez has big dreams of fitting in at the new, expensive prep school her family has sacrificed to send her to. But it's summer and instead of going to the Hamptons with her rich, white friends, she's stuck working at her family's business in the Bronx.

Margot is the protagonist of Lilliam Rivera's new young adult novel, The Education of Margot Sanchez. Rivera explains that Margot is "being punished because she stole her father's credit card to charge some pants and clothes for herself, and her punishment is to work off her debts at her father's supermarket."

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On-air challenge: Every answer today is the name of a well-known U.S. city in 7 letters. I'm going to give you a word or phrase that contains those letters in left-to-right order, but not consecutively. You name the city.

Ex. INTERVENTION (New Jersey) --> Trenton

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Is our hunger for the intrigues of the English Tudors never to be sated? A cursory search for books on Henry VIII yields over 9,000 titles. The cottage industry has outgrown its cottage and is on its way to filling up a castle. What's a determined author to do? Alison Weir's answer is to forge new approaches to time-worn situations by focusing on the women of the period. Her new historical novel, Anne Boleyn: A King's Obsession, represents a persuasive attempt to restore the humanity of a tragic, misrepresented figure, one of history's original nasty women.

When Feld Entertainment, owners of Ringling Bros., announced it's canceling the circus after nearly 150 years, it was one of the biggest victories yet for animal welfare activists.

How the circus treats it animals — especially elephants and big cats — has long been a focus for groups like the Humane Society of the U.S and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. They see it as part of a larger change going on in this country — about how Americans view animals and the way we treat them.

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Three years ago, Ben Sasse was the youngest college president in the country, overseeing Midland University in Nebraska. And he said to himself: This is great, but how can I spend time with people who are even more immature, irresponsible and unable to hold their liquor than college kids? He found an answer, and was elected to the U.S. Senate in 2014.

We've invited the Republican senator to play a game called "You're a real peach!" Three questions about peaches, the fuzzy-skinned fruit, during a week when we've heard the word "impeachment" a little more than usual.

Courtesy of rupaul.com

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we profile three craftsmen who have living in Atlanta in common:

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How does Rez, a laid-back stoner surfer dude from Laguna Beach, get drawn into a web of fanaticism?

Laleh Khadivi's new novel A Good Country tells the story of Alireza Courdee from the time he's a 14-year-old chemistry whiz, the son of Iranian immigrants, to his transformation into an American kid who leaves America behind, in all ways, to disappear into a forbidding and destructive life.

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