Arts & Culture

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One of the best parts of our "jobs" here at the World Cafe is when we discover inspiring new music. Whether it's a singer-songwriter, an indie rock band or an underground rapper, there's so much creativity swirling around in the music ecosystem.

The Current presents three artists at the Blackheart Bar on Rainey Street, from 1:30-5:30 p.m. CT.

LIVE SCHEDULE (all times CT)

1:30 p.m.: Caitlyn Smith

2:30 p.m.: Lucy Dacus

4:30 p.m.: Wye Oak

Updated 1:04 p.m. ET

The "substantial doubt" that iHeartMedia's corporate leaders expressed around the company's likelihood of surviving another year, mentioned in its quarterly financial report last November, has been put to rest.

There was always something a little jazzy about Fugazi, so it only makes sense that half of the legendary post-hardcore has resurfaced in the instrumental outfit The Messthetics. Bassist Joe Lally and drummer Brendan Canty spent nearly two decades honing their improv chops during Fugazi's extended, in-concert jams, and that ability serves them well on their new grou's self-titled debut album.

Marlon Williams has a timeless vocal style and effortless confidence. His latest album, Make Way For Love, was birthed from the ashes of his breakup with fellow singer Aldous Harding.

This excellent live performance of "What's Chasing You" is a perfect example of what makes this New Zealand artist stand out from the crowd.


  • "What's Chasing You"

"The beauty of a home in language is that it allows us to create a multiplicity of homes," writes Viet Thanh Nguyen in his introduction to Go Home!, an anthology of Asian diasporic writers edited by author Rowan Hisayo Buchanan.

Multiplicity describes the book as well, for while its stories, essays, and poems all center around the topic of home, there is no uniformity here. Asia, after all, is a vast continent; members of its diaspora are just as varied and complex as any of the countries they — and their parents and grandparents — once called home.

People might not think of winter as a fruitful season for foraging wild edibles, but nutritionist and expert forager Debbie Naha says there's actually a lot out there that you can find year-round.