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Around the turn of the millennium, hardcore had to reckon with its weirdnessand the weirdness of — becoming a viable and commercial force. At The Drive-In played the Late Show with David Letterman, Thursday's "Understanding In A Car Crash" was in regular rotation on MTV2 and The Blood Brothers' absolutely manic ... Burn, Piano Island, Burn was produced, by nü-metal diviner Ross Robinson, for a major label.

Mexican filmmaker Guillermo del Toro is known for blurring the line between fantasy and reality. He directed the 2006 dark fantasy Pan's Labyrinth, and in his latest film, The Shape of Water, he once again mixes realistic sets with mysterious monsters.

The Shape of Water is set near Washington, D.C., inside a Cold War government lab. In the midst of the space race with Russia, American authorities capture an amphibian sea creature. They plan to dissect it and see if it can withstand being shot into space.

Only Walter Martin would bring a barbershop quartet to the Tiny Desk. Best known as a singer and multi-instrumentalist with the band The Walkmen, Martin has spent his solo career making unabashedly joyful, sweetly innocent and playful music perfectly suited for quirky four-part harmonies. It works particularly well on the song with which he opens this performance, "I Went Alone On A Solo Australian Tour," a brilliant and comical call-and-response story-song about, well, going alone on a solo Australian tour.

One of the awards contenders that's emerging toward the end of this year is Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri. It stars Frances McDormand as a woman named Mildred who sets up the billboards in question to demand action from local police to solve the murder of her daughter. But it slowly shifts focus until it's only partially about Mildred; it's also about the dryly funny family man (Woody Harrelson) who's the police chief and about a viciously racist officer (Sam Rockwell) who's been terrorizing the black population of the town.

Since Fleetwood Mac released its debut album nearly 50 years ago, there have been many incarnations, comings and goings, couplings and uncouplings. But here's a new combination — Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie have released a record together!

Updated Friday at 4:15 p.m. ET

Stuff your dog's stocking with knickknacks. Paddywhacks, even. But — you've likely guessed it by now — avoid giving the dog a bone, at least a "bone treat."

Arriving in supposedly liberal Europe, a refugee is hounded by the authorities but saved by a handful of scruffy outsiders. If the scenario of Aki Kaurismaki's The Other Side of Hope sounds familiar, that might be because it's essentially the same as the plot of its predecessor, 2011's Le Havre. The principal distinction is that the Finnish writer-director's latest comic melodrama is darker and more directly tied to current events.

Woodyland In Bad Decline: 'Wonder Wheel'

Nov 30, 2017

Fate, in the Woody Allen sense, is when human error and circumstance join forces to make your life miserable. So maybe there's something fateful in the fact that Wonder Wheel, his first movie in a decade to get a holiday release, happens to be coming out during a winter of extreme discontent in entertainment, thanks to revelations of men who have for decades abused their positions of power to harass and harm women. One of the key reporters behind those revelations?

Though Ed Wood's Plan 9 From Outer Space is commonly cited as the worst film ever made, he released a far more compelling failure three years before with Glen or Glenda, a semi-autobiographical melodrama about a cross-dresser, played by Wood under the pseudonym "Daniel Davis." Glen or Glenda has all the staggering ineptitude of Plan 9 — most memorably, Bela Lugosi's armchair commentator shouting "Pull the string!"— but it has the added benefit of being nakedly personal, a plea for tolerance from a man who has chosen to reveal a closely guarded secret on s

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

The latest powerful man to be accused of sexual misconduct is the hip-hop mogul who introduced us to sounds like this.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I NEED A BEAT (REMIX)")

In a cheerful rehearsal room at Temple University, a few dozen professional musicians inspect the instruments that they'll be playing to debut an audacious piece of music by a Pulitzer Prize-winning composer.

The composition is called "Symphony For a Broken Orchestra" and, fittingly, these instruments are all broken.

Walmart has removed a controversial T-shirt with a simple message — "Rope. Tree. Journalist. SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED" — from its website, after the Radio Television Digital News Association sent the largest retailer in the U.S. a note flagging the shirt's message.

As RTDNA said, the shirt was being sold by Walmart with a company called Teespring acting as a third-party seller. The retailer removed the shirt within one day of being notified.

Jim Nabors, the comic actor best known for his years playing Gomer Pyle, one of TV's most lovable goofs, has died at the age of 87. Nabors' husband, Stan Cadwallader, confirmed to The Associated Press that the actor and singer died at home in Honolulu.

Tybee for the Holidays on Facebook

Have some fun - and get in the holiday spirit - this weekend, with the help of Do Savannah's Heather Henley and Visit Savannah's Summer Bozeman.

Ann Marsden / The Splendid Table

Today on “Two Way Street,” we’re talking to “The Splendid Table” host Lynne Rossetto Kasper ahead of her retirement. For more than two decades, Kasper has been unpacking the stories behind the food we eat for a weekly audience of about 725,000 listeners.

Jonathan Bethony admits the breads he'll be churning out at Seylou Bakery & Mill, which just opened this month in Washington, D.C., might not appeal to everyone.

The dark crusts of his pain au levain have a charred appearance and complex flavors to match their hue. Inside the loaves, a toothsome chewiness gives way to the tang of sourdough and a taste that can only be described as distinctly wheat-y.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Def Jam Recordings co-founder Russell Simmons announced Thursday that he would relinquish his leadership roles in "all the companies I founded," after a second woman accused him of sexual assault.

The Aspen Institute has unveiled the nominees for its first-ever fiction prize, a potpourri of 20 works plucked from across the world. Novels, short story collections, English-language or in translation — whatever their differences, each of the nominees "illuminates a vital contemporary issue and demonstrates the transformative power of literature on thought and culture," in the estimation of Aspen Words Literary Prize judges.

What do you hear when someone strums a guitar? You might describe the sound as bright, or full, or warm. Maybe it's metallic or trebly, or maybe it's something else.

All of that is, of course, pretty subjective. In more objective terms, we can talk about the sonic signature of the instrument.

Matt Lauer says, "There are no words to express my sorrow and regret for the pain I have caused others by words and actions," issuing his first public response after NBC fired the longtime host of Today, its flagship morning program.

Lauer spoke after lurid details of alleged sexual misconduct emerged in both Variety and The New York Times, ranging from inappropriate remarks to sexual assault — and a door in Lauer's office that he could lock by pressing a button at his desk.

Ricardo Liniers Siri, known professionally as Liniers, holds a unique position in the broad swath of Latin American culture.

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Teen Angst Has A Body Count In 'I Am Not Okay With This'

Nov 30, 2017

Sydney, the teenage protagonist of Charles Forsman's graphic novel I Am Not Okay With This, has all the usual problems of her age group — plus one. And that one problem takes this spare slice-of-life story from merely downbeat to sobering and haunting.

Chicago Symphony Orchestra cellist Dan Katz has two cellos. The better one — the one he prefers to play with the orchestra — is 200 years old and has rosewood tuning pegs. When the orchestra went on an 11-concert European tour in January, he purposefully left it home.

"I worry with that instrument about international travel now, because of those pegs," Katz said after rehearsing for a performance of Schubert's Ninth Symphony earlier this month.

Brazil's Hermeto Pascoal is a legend among musicians and fans for his ability to conjure beautiful sounds out of just about anything — from tea kettles to PVC pipes to traditional woodwinds.

Stunning singer-songwriter Angel Olsen stopped by our studio in the midst of some arena dates opening for Arcade Fire. She played favorites from her last two records with a full band, and played songs from the recently-released album Phases solo. "Sans" was simply breathtaking.

SET LIST

  • "Sans"

Photos: Steven Dewall/KCRW.

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