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Updated at 2:25 p.m. ET

Chris Cornell, the unmistakable voice and frontman of the bands Soundgarden and Audioslave, died overnight in Detroit at the age of 52. He was discovered just past midnight at the MGM Grand Detroit, according to police.

The office of the Wayne County Medical Examiner on Thursday determined the cause of his death to be suicide by hanging, noting that a full autopsy has yet to be completed.

When Josh Groban takes his final bow in Broadway's Natasha, Pierre and The Great Comet of 1812, he'll leave some very big shoes to fill. Fans of the multiplatinum-selling recording artist have flocked to see him in this exuberantly offbeat musical, which is based on a section of the Russian novel War and Peace.

Chris Cornell Of Soundgarden Dies At 52

May 18, 2017

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK. Now, let's remember the life of a grunge rock pioneer. The musician Chris Cornell has died. He was the lead singer of Soundgarden.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BLACK HOLE SUN")

SOUNDGARDEN: (Singing) Black hole sun, won't you come? Won't you come?

If you don't know Maysa Leak by name, you've almost certainly heard her voice. She started singing 25 years ago in Stevie Wonder's female backing group Wonderlove, and later became the vocalist for British funk band Incognito. Since venturing out on her own as Maysa in 1995, she's recorded 13 solo albums, and her latest, Love Is A Battlefield (due out May 26 on Shanachie), is a collection of her favorite songs. These covers embrace R&B's established heritage while adding a contemporary sheen.

Beginning at 7 p.m. ET on Wednesday, May 17 you can see Ani DiFranco, Blondie, Chicano Batman and more perform during the first night of public radio's Non-Comm 2017. The show will stream live via VuHaus from World Cafe Live in Philadelphia.

Find Wednesday's full schedule below; all set times are shown in Eastern time and are subject to change.

Wednesday, May 17

7 p.m. — The National Reserve

7:30 p.m. — Brent Cobb

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It's a question the broadcast TV industry asks itself around this time every year: How long can we keep this going?

The occasion is TV's upfront season, when all the big programmers announce their plans for the next season in glitzy presentations for big advertisers in New York, selling commercial space in the new schedules early.

These days, the moneymaking heart of the TV business — broadcast television — is fighting harder than ever to stay competitive with the innovation at streaming services like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon.

Courtesy of Chuck Klosterman

Writer Chuck Klosterman has met a lot of interesting people. He’s interviewed famous film actors and rock stars for Esquire, ESPN, and the New York Times Magazine. A new collection of his writing is called “Chuck Klosterman X: A Highly Specific, Defiantly Incomplete History of the Early 21st Century.” Chuck joins us ahead of an appearance in Atlanta next Monday, May 22.

Ilustrated by Dian Wang

How do children’s books represent people of color? Authors and educators have organized a festival to raise awareness and celebrate books where children of color are heroes and heroines. “Hey, Let’s Read” is happening in Atlanta on May 20. We spoke with author  Patrice McLaurin and KaCey Venning, executive director of the “Hey Let’s Read" event.

Wikipedia

Blue Ridge is a popular getaway town in the North Georgia Mountains. It's also home to a concentration of gay couples. That’s led to a rise in the number of LGBT-owned businesses.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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The celebrated Brooklyn four-piece Grizzly Bear has released another new song, "Mourning Sound," and given the upcoming album from which it's taken a name and a release date: Painted Ruins will be out on August 18. It's the band's first since Shields in 2012.

T Sisters On Mountain Stage

May 17, 2017

The Oakland, Calif., sibling trio T Sisters makes its debut on Mountain Stage, recorded live at the Peoples Bank Theatre in Marietta, Ohio. Sisters Chloe, Rachel and Erika Tietjen grew up with a steady musical diet of folk sing-a-longs (with their dad at the piano) and "jock jams" (their mother was an aerobics instructor), but they fell in love with Appalachian roots later in life. In recent years, the women have made a name for themselves on the festival circuit with their close-knit harmonies and happy-go-poppy take on traditional Americana.

The Thistle And Shamrock: Celtic Piano

May 17, 2017

In the right hands, the driving rhythms of fiddle music and the ornamentations of Celtic pipes and harp all dance freely on piano keys. Join us for a trip to the heart of Celtic piano music, featuring artists like Antoni O'Breskey and Micháel Ó Súilleabháin.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

There's a lot of heart in every project Maryn Jones touches. Her lyrics – which evince struggles with self-doubt and depression, and a penchant for self-reliance – are graceful and introspective. And her voice is powerfully expressive, whether combined with the muscular, fuzzy guitars of All Dogs – the indie punk band she fronts — or providing delicate harmonies for Saintseneca, the folk-rock group of which she's a member.

Browse through some turn-of-the-century American cookbooks, and it's obvious that popular tastes have changed (such as the presence of fried cornmeal mush and the absence of cilantro). But more striking than the shift in flavors and ingredients is the focus on feeding those who are sick — or, to use the parlance of the time, "cooking for invalids."

Let's get this out of the way: The best part of The Golden Cockerel and Other Writings is not the title piece. In his introduction, translator Douglas J. Weatherford makes a big deal out of El gallo de oro, Mexican master Juan Rulfo's long-ignored second novel, but it's nothing compared to the sketches and fragments that come after.

You hear a lot of different types of music on World Cafe, but you may not have ever heard anything like Tanya Tagaq, who has collaborated with Björk and won Canada's prestigious Polaris Music Prize.

Don't Text In The Movie, Or Risk A Lawsuit

May 17, 2017

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Podcasts — everyone seems to have one. And more and more people are listening to them. At the same time, sales for audiobooks are growing faster than any other segment of the publishing industry.That got me wondering: Are podcasts helping to drive listeners to audiobooks? The answer, as it turns out, is more circular than that.

Bon Jovi Surprises College Graduates

May 17, 2017

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(SOUNDBITE OF BON JOVI SONG, "IT'S MY LIFE")

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

"Joke theft" sounds funny.

Unless you're a comedy writer and you see a late-night TV host telling a joke you wrote. Five times.

That's what the writer Alex Kaseberg says happened to him in late 2014 and early 2015, a charge disputed by Conan O'Brien and his lawyers.

Play-by-play announcer Beth Mowins is set to become the first-ever female broadcaster to call an NFL game televised nationally.

A commentator for ESPN since 1994, she'll call the Los Angeles Chargers vs. Denver Broncos game in ESPN's opening Monday Night Football doubleheader on Sept. 11. Former Buffalo Bills and New York Jets head coach Rex Ryan will join her.

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