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Uber has appointed Expedia CEO Dara Khosrowshahi to be its new chief executive, a source familiar with the ride-sharing company tells NPR.

Khosrowshahi has been at the travel company Expedia for more than a decade, reports NPR's Aarti Shahani. He steps into the role at a tumultuous time, as Uber seeks to fill a leadership vacuum. Co-founder Travis Kalanick resigned under pressure in June, though he remains on the company's board.

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Rajeev Dhawan, director of the Economic Forecasting Center at Georgia State University, expects moderate job growth for the rest of 2017.

Dhawan issued his forecast for the third quarter on Wednesday, August 23. He says that Georgia’s income and job growth has been affected due to domestic demand driven sectors, such as hospitality, retail and education, not showing much growth.

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Dependable sources of labor and a fresh look at international trade topped the wish list of farmers and other stakeholders when they met with U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue Friday.

Perdue held a roundtable discussion in Tifton in his role as the head of President Trump’s Task Force on Rural Prosperity. It was the first such roundtable in the South.

“We’re here from the federal government and we’re here not to hurt you,” Perdue joked.

President Trump is imposing a new round of economic sanctions that are aimed squarely at choking off money to Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro's regime but "carefully calibrated" to preserve U.S. oil imports from the South American country, according to the White House.

The latest sanctions — the fourth round in recent weeks — are the first to move beyond freezing the assets of individuals and target the government itself.

Amazon is cutting the prices of bananas, butter, organic eggs, and other best-selling staples at Whole Foods' 470 stores, promising customers lower costs and targeting the grocer's "Whole Paycheck" nickname. The online giant also says its Amazon Prime members will get special prices and perks.

In what may be her last appearance at the annual economic summit held in Wyoming, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen on Friday warned against forgetting the lessons of the Great Recession.

And she staunchly defended the post-crisis regulatory reforms that she says have made banks safer.

A decade ago, Nguyen Tran ran a small private company producing independent films, while his wife Thi Tran worked in advertising. When the economy crashed in 2008, Nguyen's projects began to run dry and Thi lost her job the following year. Out of desperation, they started an illegal underground restaurant in their North Hollywood apartment. They called it "Starry Kitchen," named after Thi's favorite Cantonese cooking show from Hong Kong.

A South Korean court's decision Friday to sentence Lee Jae-yong, the de facto leader of Samsung, to five years in prison on corruption charges is reverberating across the country. The nation's economy and Samsung's fortunes have been inextricably linked for decades. Now both face questions about what they'll look like going forward.

A court in South Korea has found the de facto leader of Samsung, Lee Jae-yong, guilty in a corruption case involving South Korea's former president. The court in Seoul sentenced the billionaire Lee to five years in prison on a string of corruption charges, including bribery, embezzlement and perjury. Here's what you need to know:

What's Lee going to jail for?

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August has been a stormy month for the Trump administration. So stormy, in fact, that it's clouded over ethical issues involving the White House. Here's NPR's Peter Overby.

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Twenty-five years ago today, we were monitoring one of the strongest hurricanes to ever make landfall in the U.S.

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Ever since its fabled role in World War II, Jeep has been an American icon. And now the famous U.S. brand may be sold to a Chinese company.

Jeep was primarily made for the United Sates military, starting in 1941. It was used to transport troops during World War II, and that's when the rugged-looking vehicle captured the imagination of people worldwide.

Your car already reminds you of a lot of things. Fasten your seat belt, charge your battery, inflate your tires, fill the tank.

Amazon's purchase of Whole Foods is another step closer to reality, after the Federal Trade Commission decided the grocery deal would not hamper competition or provide an unfair advantage.

The second-highest ranking member of the Florida Senate pledged a legislative review of a state law that has allowed injured undocumented workers to be arrested and potentially deported rather than paid workers' compensation benefits.

"Legitimate injuries shouldn't be denied just because the person was an undocumented immigrant," said Republican Sen. Anitere Flores, the president pro tempore of the state Senate and chairwoman of the Banking and Insurance Committee.

As Kevin Sullivan slowly rumbles his pickup truck across his 60-acre farm near the Connecticut-Massachusetts border, he leans in and asks: "What's farmland?"

"You picture [a] cow," says Sullivan. Perhaps "Farmer Joe, like me." Maybe you think about my tomatoes and peppers, he adds.

But now, Sullivan and other New England farmers are turning their farms into sources of another kind of commodity – electricity. They are allowing utility companies to set up solar panels on their land, and in the process making some much-needed extra money.

The U.S. power grid could become less reliable if too much electricity comes from renewable energy and natural gas, according to a study from the Department of Energy.

But not everyone is buying it. Environmentalists suspect the Trump administration is just trying to prop up an ailing coal industry.

Energy Secretary Rick Perry called for the study in the spring. The report doesn't say there is a grid reliability problem now — only that one could develop if more coal and nuclear power plants shut down.

Updated at 1:35 p.m. ET

A $758.7 million dream was dashed for many lottery players in the U.S. Thursday, after news emerged that just one winning ticket had been sold in Chicopee, Mass., for Wednesday night's Powerball drawing.

The winner is Mavis Wanczyk, 53, who lives in Chicopee and who worked, until today, at a medical center where she's been employed for 32 years.

The Justice Department is dropping the most controversial part of its demand for records relating to a website used to coordinate protests during the presidential inauguration.

In court filings submitted yesterday, ahead of a hearing Thursday in D.C. Superior Court, the government suggests modifications to the warrant it attained for files from web hosting company DreamHost, which hosted the website DisruptJ20.org.

The hashtag is 10! Yes, the symbol that started out as the lowly "number sign" or "pound" on the telephone keypad and later morphed into something entirely different is 10 years old today. And it has accomplished quite a lot. In fact, it's hard to imagine modern communication without it.

And you might think it was all by design. That the folks running Twitter needed a catchy little tool to help their new platform catch fire, and the hashtag is what they came up with.

But that's not the way it happened.

You can swipe. You can scroll. But New Yorkers will no longer be able to flip through The Village Voice. This week, the legendary alternative weekly announced that it's ending its free paper version.

In a press release distributed Tuesday, the publication said it plans to maintain its digital platform and continue to host events but will no longer be printing paper copies. The Voice had been in print for more than six decades and recently had a distribution of some 120,000 copies each week.

Danish police have identified remains that washed ashore in Copenhagen as those of Kim Wall, the Swedish journalist who died aboard inventor Peter Madsen's personal submarine earlier this month. Authorities announced Wednesday that they had matched Wall's DNA with a female torso, which was found without a head, legs or arms.

With an eye on the future of online retailing, Walmart and Google are teaming up to go after rival Amazon in a play that also targets the growing market for voice-activated shopping.

Starting next month, Walmart customers will be able to access hundreds of thousands of products from the company's shelves — everything from dishwashing soap to dining tables — via the online retailing service Google Express. Until now, Walmart's enormous inventory was available online only through the company's own website.

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It's a summer evening on the French Atlantic island of Noirmoutier. As the sun shimmers on the rustling marsh grasses, Hervé Zarka rakes in sea salt from shallow pools. He uses a simoussi, a 10-foot pole tipped with a flat board. Salt has been harvested this way since at least the seventh century, when Benedictine monks dug the canals that bring seawater into this marshland.

When White House chief strategist Steve Bannon was pushed out of his job last week, it underscored the growing clout of President Trump's chief of staff, John Kelly, a retired Marine Corps general.

And when Trump announced he was increasing U.S. troops in Afghanistan on Monday, after suggesting for years that he wouldn't, administration officials were quick to note that he was heeding the advice of "the generals."

The push for renewable energy in the U.S. often focuses on well-established sources of electricity: solar, wind and hydropower. Off the coast of California, a team of researchers is working on what they hope will become an energy source of the future — macroalgae, otherwise known as kelp.

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