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A massive hack of the company Equifax has compromised the personal information of as many as 143 million Americans. Regulators have launched an investigation into what appears to be one of the most serious data breaches ever. NPR's Chris Arnold reports.

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Even before Hurricane Irma arrived at Florida's doorstep scammers geared into action.

Three executives of the credit-reporting agency Equifax sold nearly $2 million worth of company stock within days of a massive data breach potentially affecting 143 million Americans — one that wasn't publicly disclosed until more than a month later.

In a statement, Equifax says the executives "had no knowledge that an intrusion had occurred at the time they sold their shares."

On the campaign trail last year, after a tragic attack on an Orlando nightclub left 49 people dead, Donald Trump went out of his way to thank the LGBT community, vowing to protect them from violence and tweeting, "I will fight for you."

Years earlier, in an interview with a magazine that reaches a large gay audience, Trump told The Advocate that he supported gay people serving in the military.

This season's massive hurricanes will force communities in Texas and Florida to ask a tough question: How do you make sure homes and businesses never flood again? Since its own devastating flood in 2010, Nashville has embraced one answer: offer to tear them down.

It would seem a welcome way out of disaster, but it's not always an easy sell.

A watchdog group wants the feds to investigate some of the estimated 3,300 Russian-backed ads that appeared on Facebook during the 2016 presidential campaign.

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Long & Foster, one of the largest privately held companies in the Washington, D.C. region, was acquired Thursday by HomeServices of America. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

"This is big," David Charron, chief strategy officer of Bright MLS, a multiple listing service told The Washington Post. "This is yet another data point that suggests that real estate drives the economy.

Equifax, an international credit reporting agency, has announced that a cybersecurity breach exposed the personal information of 143 million U.S. consumers. In a statement released Thursday, the Atlanta-based agency acknowledged that "criminals exploited a U.S. website application vulnerability to gain access to certain files."

Amazon made the sort of announcement Thursday morning that mayors dream about.

The tech juggernaut said it was looking for the right city in which to build its "HQ2": a second headquarters in North America, equal to its campus in Seattle. And it's going to make that selection process a public one, akin to how cities bid to host an Olympic Games.

Vanity Fair's long-serving editor in chief, Graydon Carter, has announced that he is stepping down at the end of the year after a quarter-century leading the magazine.

The charismatic, silver-maned editor, possessed of a keen wit and a sly delivery, would have been a worthy subject of his own publication had he not led it. Carter embodies the urbane style and sensibility reflected in Vanity Fair's pages, at once engaged and detached, immersed in observing the world swirling around him.

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A massive shift happened, quietly, during the Obama years: Democrats got comfortable and gave up their lead in digital campaigning, Democratic and Republican political operatives say.

Republicans, meanwhile, itched to regain power and invested heavily in using the Internet to build political support.

Now, liberals in Silicon Valley want to shift the balance of power.

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Driving down the main commercial artery in Muncie, Ind., it seems the job market is doing well. The local unemployment rate stands at 3.8 percent, and there are hiring signs posted outside the McDonald's, a pizza joint and at stop lights.

Around 2007 — the last time the market was so tight — job applicants came streaming through the offices of Express Employment Professionals, a staffing agency that screens and places about 120 workers a month, mostly at the local manufacturing firms.

Note: This show originally ran in 2015.

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NPR reporters are returning home this summer to see how the places they grew up have changed — from the economy to schools to how people see their community and country.

In announcing the president's decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, Attorney General Jeff Sessions stressed the legal arguments for that decision.

Big Business Pushes Back On DACA

Sep 6, 2017

If the government wants to deport a Microsoft employee who has benefited from DACA, “it’s going to have to go through us to get that person,” Microsoft President Brad Smith told NPR.

Updated at 6:20 p.m. ET

By all accounts, Hurricane Irma is a behemoth, a "potentially catastrophic" storm bearing 185-mph winds and the threat of devastation for the islands caught in its northwesterly course toward Florida. That threat packed an added wallop Wednesday for Puerto Rico, a U.S. territory already reeling from billions in debt.

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Next week, a controversial patent from the early days of the Internet expires. It is known as the 1-click patent, and it belongs to Amazon. Julia DeWitt from our Planet Money podcast explains why this is such a big deal.

Zoë Quinn On #Gamergate

Sep 5, 2017

You may have heard of Gamergate, the 2014 Internet … event that exposed much of the world to the sexism and abuse that are rampant in some corners of online culture. But what do you know about the woman who was at the center of it?

Game designer and programmer Zoë Quinn dealt with a barrage of hateful, violent trolling. And she survived. She tells the story in her new book, “Crash Override.”

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