Business

Ways to Connect

Since President Trump took office in January, enforcement of environmental laws has dropped dramatically, compared with past administrations. A study released by the Environmental Integrity Project finds that $12 million in civil penalties have been collected from violators in 26 cases between January and the end of July.

Delray Beach's charming downtown, palm trees and waves attract locals, vacationers and, increasingly, drug users who come here to try to get off opioids. In some parts of the small Florida community, there's a residential program for people recovering from addiction — a sober living house or "sober home" — on nearly every block. Sometimes two or three.

Every day, more than 10 Americans suffer amputations on what is by far the most dangerous woodworking tool: the table saw. Regulators in Washington, D.C., are moving closer to adopting a rule that would make new saws so much safer that they could prevent 99 percent of serious accidents.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

Continuing disputes between the United States and Canada over lumber imports will not get in the way of a new factory announced Wednesday in Bibb County.  

 

Canada based Irving Consumer Products announced their intent to build a $400 million, 700,000 square foot plant  which will turn softwood lumber into toilet tissue in Macon. That will create 200 permanent jobs.

What You Say Will Be Held Against You

Aug 9, 2017

A Google engineer was fired this week over a memo he wrote about what he saw as the company’s “politically correct monoculture” and questioning policies aimed at hiring more women.

He argued that women were biologically less suited for certain jobs in tech, drawing outrage over both his opinions and over his firing.

With guest host John Donvan.

President Donald Trump has insisted that his 17-day stay at his New Jersey golf course is not a standard vacation:

Google fired a male employee after he wrote an incendiary memo about women at work. But now what?

The tech giant has a poor track record when it comes to diversity. A new leader at Google could have the solution — if her bosses want to listen.

David Goldman / AP Photo

A recent study by the non-profit Prosperity Now finds white-owned businesses make, on average, nearly ten times as much as African-American-owned businesses in the South. It also shows black business owners have a harder time finding mentorship and capital. We discuss with Dr. Dennis Kimbro, Professor of Business at Clark Atlanta University.

Most of us think of jellyfish, when we think of jellyfish, as something to be avoided at the beach (or as the protagonists in that one episode of Friends).

Even marine biologists have historically cast aside these bothersome interlopers when conducting surveys of more "important" ocean species.

Since its inception nearly a decade ago, Airbnb has faced questions from people of color as to whether the company's worldwide "vacancy" sign really applied to them.

The company has been plagued by allegations and several lawsuits, predominantly but not exclusively from African-Americans, claiming discrimination.

Disney is saying goodbye to Netflix and will aggressively enter the crowded subscription streaming market.

There will be one streaming service for sports and another for films and television shows, the company announced on Tuesday. The same day it reported weak fiscal third-quarter earnings.

The Financial Crisis, 10 Years On

Aug 9, 2017

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

On August 9, 2007, 10 years ago, we saw the first signs of a financial disaster that would bring down some of the biggest banks, crush the housing market and send the economy into the worst downturn since the 1930s.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

On Nov. 23, 1914, the Financial Times ran a piece about the wild success of British efforts to fund World War I.

War Loans were "oversubscribed," the paper said; applications were "pouring in"; the public "has offered the Government every penny it asked for — and more." The "amazing result" showed "how strong is the financial position of the British nation."

On Aug. 8, 2017, the paper had a follow-up. A "clarification."

It might seem like vocal discontent about airline bumping has reached a high-water mark recently, especially after a passenger was bloodied and dragged off a United flight last April.

Now, new data from the U.S. Department of Transportation shows that bumped-passenger rates are at their lowest level since 1995.

In Prince George's County, Md., every first responder carries naloxone, the drug that can reverse an opioid overdose.

"We carry it in our first-in bags," says Bryan Spies, the county's battalion chief in charge of emergency services. "So whenever we arrive at a patient's side, it's in the bag, along with things like glucose, aspirin and oxygen."

The shrinking unemployment rate has been a healthy turn of events for people with job-based insurance.

Eager to attract good help in a tight labor market — and unsure of the future of the Affordable Care Act — large employers are newly committed to maintaining health coverage for workers and often for their families, too, according to new research and interviews with business analysts.

Two agencies in the Transportation Department are ending their push for a rule that would have required truck drivers and train operators to be tested for obstructive sleep apnea, a sleep disorder that's been linked to preventable accidents.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai cut his the vacation short and returned to the company's Mountain View, Calif., headquarters as criticism mounted over a senior engineer's controversial memo condemning Google's diversity initiatives. The engineer was subsequently fired.

The memo, which some inside Google jokingly called a "manifesto," was widely shared inside and outside the company.

Think of the swastika and chances are that what comes to mind is the murderous regime of Adolf Hitler's Nazi Germany.

But the symbol is at least 5,000 years old and is incorporated into Hindu, Buddhist and Jain iconography. Even today, in the Indian subcontinent and parts of Southeast Asia it is not uncommon to see the symbol painted on buildings and vehicles as a sign of good fortune.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

With guest host John Donvan.

What does it mean to be made in America?

San Francisco-based clothier American Giant sells apparel for men and women, all manufactured in the U.S. It’s not cheap. The company’s popular hoodie retails at around $90. So, is it worth it to be American-made?

We talk with American Giant CEO Bayard Winthrop about why he focuses on more than the bottom line in his business.

GUESTS

"Who would have thought one little chalkboard would cause such a stir?" That's the question asked by the proprietor of Handsome Her, a vegan cafe that gives priority seating to women — and gives men a chance to pay an 18 percent premium, citing a gender pay gap.

Updated 11:30 p.m. ET

A senior software engineer reportedly has been fired by Google after a memo he wrote criticizing diversity initiatives was leaked and sparked protests on social media.

The 3,300-word document that has been shared across Google's internal networks says "biological causes" are part of the reason women aren't represented equally in its tech departments and leadership. The senior engineer also cited "men's higher drive for status."

Although virtually nothing is predictable in politics these days, here is one certainty: Americans — at least the ones watching the news — are about to hear a lot about corporate taxes.

You've heard that American agriculture loves trade. And it's easy to see why: Under NAFTA, American farmers have quadrupled their exports to Canada and Mexico and the two nations rank second and third, after China, as markets for U.S. farm goods.

A decade ago, utility executives and policymakers dreamed of a clean energy future powered by a new generation of cheap, safe nuclear reactors. Projects to expand existing nuclear plants in South Carolina and Georgia were supposed to be the start of the "nuclear renaissance."

High-profile Fox News host Eric Bolling has been suspended after HuffPost reported on Friday that he sent unwanted lewd texts with "an unsolicited photo of male genitalia" to at least three female colleagues.

Bolling co-hosts The Fox News Specialists, a daily news and talk show and is the sole host of Cashin' In, a national business analysis program, which airs on Saturday mornings.

Imagine going to the grocery store for dinner, not to pick up a rotisserie chicken to take home, but to actually eat at the store. As online grocery shopping grows, many supermarkets are adding sit-down restaurants in a move to attract more millennials. And it seems to be working.

Uber knowingly leased unsafe cars to its drivers in Singapore, The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday.

One of those cars, a recalled Honda Vezel with an Uber driver at the wheel, spouted flames from its dashboard in January, melting the car's interior and cracking its windshield. The driver had just dropped off a passenger when he began smelling the smoke.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Pages