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Donald Trump has won the South Carolina primary, while Florida Sen. Marco Rubio appears to have edged out Texas Sen. Ted Cruz for second place.

"There's nothing easy about running for president, I can tell you. It's tough, it's nasty, it's mean, it's vicious, it's beautiful," Trump declared to his supporters at his victory rally in Spartanburg, S.C.

Trump took 32.5 percent of the vote, while Rubio and Cruz were nearly even with 22.5 percent and 22.3 percent, respectively.

Nevada Caucus Update

Feb 20, 2016

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Hillary Clinton will win the Nevada Democratic caucuses, the Associated Press is reporting.

With 84 percent of the precincts reporting, Clinton has 52.5 percent of the vote, compared to Sen. Bernie Sanders' 47.5 percent.

"Tens of thousands of men and women with kids to raise, bills to pay, and dreams that won't die — this is your campaign," she told a crowd at Caesar's Palace in Las Vegas. "And it is a campaign to break down every barrier that holds you back."

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Justice Antonin Scalia, who died last Saturday, was buried today after a funeral mass attended by more than 3,000 people in the nation's capital.

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The Stream is your source for news, photos and analysis from NPR's political team on the ground in South Carolina and Nevada. For more coverage and analysis visit NPR Politics or elections.npr.org.

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Zika Spike Overwhelms Colombia Doctors

Feb 20, 2016

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The photo op at the end of Marco Rubio's Greenville rally Thursday morning was the stuff GOP dreams are made of.

The young Latino presidential candidate many top party leaders believe would be their best standard-bearer smiled and cheered, flanked by South Carolina's Indian-American female governor, the state's young black Republican senator and the congressman who's led the investigation into the Benghazi attacks and Hillary Clinton's involvement.

How many ways can The Internet mock Jeb Bush?

So many. So many ways. Here's the latest.

Imagine, for a moment, that Congress is targeting a military base in your state with stiff budget cuts.

Think about what makes you more upset: the fact that this base has long played an important, historic role in your community? Or the fact that the budget cuts could have a rippling negative effect on the local economy?

If you're more agitated by the former, you may be what Texas Sen. Ted Cruz's campaign considers a "timid traditionalist." If, on the other hand, the budget cuts make you more worried, you could be a "temperamental" voter.

It wouldn't be South Carolina without stuff like this.

A superPAC supporting Ted Cruz is hitting Donald Trump in South Carolina radio ads and robo calls for his support of the removal of the Confederate battle flag from the State Capitol grounds. Another robo call out Friday night is also hitting Trump for appearing to be supportive of "forward motion" on LGBT equality.

On the eve of the Nevada presidential primary caucuses, the State Department released an additional 1,116 pages of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's emails.

Portions of 64 documents were retroactively classified as confidential, according to a State Department official. That's the lowest level of classification. The latest batch of emails did not include any Secret or Top Secret documents, according to the official.

The TV ad campaign for Republican Jeb Bush is faltering in South Carolina, where GOP voters go to the polls Saturday.

A new report by the Wesleyan Media Project finds that the pro-Bush superPAC, Right To Rise USA, aired an estimated 2,664 ads in the state between Feb. 1 and Feb. 14. At the same time, Sen. Ted Cruz's organization — his campaign and two superPACs — ran 4,904 ads. Sen. Marco Rubio's campaign and superPAC aired 3,882 ads.

As Apple and Justice Department lawyers duke it out in court over the government's attempts to force the tech company to unlock the iPhone of one of the San Bernardino killers, there are calls for a legislative solution in the debate that pits privacy against national security concerns.

But the chances of Congress coming up with what would almost certainly be a controversial solution to a highly complex issue in an election year seem remote. In part, that's because no one can figure out how to resolve the issue.

The Department of Justice has filed a motion to compel Apple to cooperate with a government investigation and help access data on an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino assailants.

The motion filed in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California (read it in full below) lays out the government's legal case for why Apple should provide technical assistance.

The world wasn't prepared for Zika to fly across continents in the span of a few months. In 2015, when the virus began rapidly spreading across the Americas, health workers were surprised, and researchers were caught flat-footed when it came time to provide information to protecting the public's health.

Justice Antonin Scalia, who died on Saturday, lay in repose at the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday, as the court, the public and the president paid their respects. While the battle over Scalia's replacement raged in the political world, the atmosphere at the court was somber.

The flag-draped casket was carried up the marble steps of the Supreme Court on Friday morning, between two long rows of former Scalia clerks, and into the Great Hall.

Inside, the remaining eight justices lined up in their new order of seniority, as they will be on the bench on Monday.

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With the Zika virus in the daily headlines, public health authorities should be looking carefully at how they communicate about this latest emerging infectious disease.

People need to be alerted, not alarmed.

That balance can be hard to strike when the health sources people turn to range from acquaintances on social media to politicians, instead of physicians and other medical professionals.

Ted Cruz needs an awakening among his religious base for a strong showing or a surprise win on Saturday in South Carolina.

In any other year in the GOP primary, the Texas senator, who talks of his faith with ease and frequently reiterates that he will defend religious liberty, might have the state's sizable evangelical vote sewn up. The voting bloc was crucial to his win in Iowa earlier this month, and religious conservatives make up an even larger share of the South Carolina Republican electorate.

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