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Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., has sent a letter to House Speaker Paul Ryan and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi informing them of his decision to step down from Congress as of Tuesday, amid allegations of sexual misconduct leveled by multiple women.

Even in Alabama ZIP codes where Donald Trump dominated in 2016, there are lots of campaign signs that say "GOP for Jones." That is Doug Jones, the Democrat opposing Republican candidate Roy Moore in next week's special election for the U.S. Senate.

Eric Conn, the Kentucky lawyer who defrauded the Social Security system of more than half a billion dollars before fleeing the U.S. in June, has been arrested in Honduras, according to that country's Public Ministry. Wanted by the FBI, he also sent taunting messages while on the lam.

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Michigan Democrat John Conyers has announced his retirement. He spoke with Mildred Gaddis, a local Detroit radio host this morning.

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO SHOW, "THE MILDRED GADDIS SHOW")

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Updated on Dec. 6 at 4:50 p.m. ET

The cake shop case before the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday promises to be more than just a food fight.

At issue is whether Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop in Lakewood, Colo., has a constitutional right to refuse to create a cake for a same-sex couple. Part of Phillips' argument is that his First Amendment rights, including his artistic expression, would be compromised if he made a cake for a same-sex wedding.

When Monica Spalding got the renewal letter from her health insurance company with premium details for the upcoming year, she couldn't believe her eyes. The insurer estimated that the share of the monthly premium that she and her husband would owe for their marketplace silver plan would go up from the current $28 a month to $545.

If the saga of Michael Flynn feels like it's been hanging over President Trump's head since Inauguration Day, that's because it has.

The story of how Trump's first national security adviser came to plead guilty to lying to FBI investigators and cooperate in the special counsel's Russia investigation spans two presidential terms and also touches government officials who were subsequently fired by Trump.

Voice of America, Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty are among ten American media outlets operating in Russia that are now considered "foreign agents" under a new directive from the Kremlin – a tit-for-tat response to a similar U.S. move.

Atlanta Mayor's Race Too Close To Call

Dec 5, 2017
John Bazemore / AP Photo

Keisha Lance Bottoms declared herself the next mayor of Atlanta early Wednesday morning while her opponent, Mary Norwood, called for a recount.

Updated at 6:10 a.m. ET

President Trump has delayed signing a waiver to a U.S. law that would otherwise set in motion a move of the U.S. embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, a White House spokesman says.

"We will share a decision on the waiver in coming days," White House deputy press secretary Hogan Gidley told reporters on Monday aboard Air Force One as it returned the president from a visit to Utah.

Hours later, in a fiery speech, Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan called any such move by Washington a "red line" for Muslims.

John Anderson, the longtime GOP congressman from Illinois who bolted his party in 1980 to run as an independent against President Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan, has died. He was 95.

His daughter, Diane Anderson, confirmed her father's death on Sunday night in Washington, D.C. after a long illness.

The World War II veteran and 10-term congressman from Rockford, Ill., was first elected to the House in 1960, beginning his career as a conservative, but gradually moderating his views.

As a candidate, Donald Trump once joked, "I could stand in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn't lose any voters."

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort is trying to sway public opinion of his case by working with a Russian collaborator who has ties to Russia's intelligence services, special counsel Robert Mueller's office said in court papers Monday.

Mueller's team said it learned last week that Manafort has been working with a Russian compatriot on a newspaper column that prosecutors say violates a gag order by U.S. District Court Judge Amy Berman Jackson. Attorneys in the case were instructed not to talk about it in public.

Republicans say the tax-cutting overhaul being debated in Congress will jump-start the U.S. economy, leading to a lot more investment and hiring by companies.

But some economists say the tax plans — which would sharply cut corporate and business taxes and eliminate numerous deductions for individuals — come at precisely the wrong time. Lower taxes could also be undercut by Federal Reserve policymakers, who are gradually raising interest rates, they say.

President Trump went to Utah on Monday. The official purpose of his trip was to announce the reduction of two national monuments in the state, though he could have signed those orders in the Oval Office.

But the journey west may have served a political purpose for the president — to keep a political rival out of Washington.

Former Rep. Corrine Brown has been sentenced to five years in prison for pocketing hundreds of thousands of dollars from donors who believed their money was going to charity. A federal judge on Monday sentenced the Florida Democrat, who was voted out of office last year, on 18 crimes ranging from conspiracy to fraud.

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President Trump went to Utah today to announce that his administration will reduce the size of two national monuments. And Trump may have had another mission - keeping Utah Senator Orrin Hatch from retiring.

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David Goldman / AP Photo

Atlanta has a new voter bloc that could sway the 2017 mayoral runoff election.

Keisha Lance Bottoms garnered 26 percent of votes on November 7, largely from the city's southern, African-American voters. Mary Norwood's 21 percent came mostly from the city's northern, white voters.

Kennesaw State University political scientist Kerwin Swint sat down with Rickey Bevington to explain why a significant group of East Atlanta voters are voting on economic policy rather than race or politics.

Wikimedia Commons / Sir Mildred Pierce

Churches in the United States are barred from endorsing political candidates, or contributing to campaigns. This part of our tax code is known as the Johnson Amendment. It includes all non-profit organizations. But some Republicans, including President Trump, want to repeal the amendment as part of a federal tax overhaul happening now. We talk with researcher Matthew Boedy, an assistant professor at the University of North Georgia, and Susan Anderson,  an accounting professor at Elon University in North Carolina.

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