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Attorney General Jeff Sessions flatly denied reports of a possible undisclosed meeting with the Russian ambassador during the 2016 campaign in his opening statement before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday.

By the time Stephenie Hashmi was in her mid-20s, she had achieved a lifelong dream — she was the charge nurse of one of Kansas City's largest intensive care units. But even as she cared for patients, she realized that something was off with her own health.

"I remember just feeling tired and feeling sick and hurting, and not knowing why my joints and body was hurting," she says.

Can eating insects help people survive a famine?

Are there new ways to help farmers water their crops when drought strikes?

Isn't the basic hunger problem that there's just not enough food to go around?

Those are some of the tough questions that you submitted in April for our monthly #CuriousGoat series.

Updated at 5:37 p.m. ET

Attorney General Jeff Sessions told a Senate committee Tuesday that any suggestion he colluded with Russia during last year's U.S. presidential campaign was an "appalling and detestable lie."

Sessions spent more than 2 1/2 hours before the Senate Intelligence Committee, which included several testy exchanges with Democratic senators who accused him of obstructing their investigation.

The 51st State?

Jun 13, 2017

Puerto Ricans are American citizens, without all the benefits of folks from the mainland. The island recently voted in favor of lobbying the U.S. government for statehood, though less than a third of the population cast ballots.

The U.S. territory faces a crushing debt, one that would be easier to resolve if it was a state. So why the low turnout? And should America treat Puerto Rico like a state, or a colony?

GUESTS

Trump ally Chris Ruddy has caused quite a stir over the past 24 hours.

The CEO of the right-wing website Newsmax, a close friend of Trump's, has been making the media rounds saying President Trump is considering firing special counsel Robert Mueller, who is leading the Department of Justice investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

A bipartisan group of senators has taken a step to limit the Trump administration's ability to ease sanctions on Russia, adding an amendment to a widely supported Iran sanctions bill to make sure Congress has a say in future Russia policy. The Senate is considering the bill this week.

Drones could soon be dropping off packages at customers' doors. But researchers in Sweden have drones in mind for a different, potentially lifesaving delivery: automated external defibrillators.

Using drones to carry AEDs to people who are in cardiac arrest could reduce the time between when patients go into cardiac arrest and when they receive the first shock from an AED, the researchers say.

Updated at 12:40 p.m. ET

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein said Tuesday that even if President Trump told him to fire Robert Mueller as special counsel overseeing the Department of Justice investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election, he would not follow the order unless he thought there was good cause.

The statement came after Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, asked Rosenstein during an open Senate Appropriations subcommittee hearing what he would do if Trump asked him to fire Mueller.

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A Conversation With Sen. Patrick Leahy

Jun 13, 2017

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Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

In what has ignited another firestorm of debate in polarized Washington, a longtime friend of President Trump said Monday night that Trump is "weighing" whether to dismiss Robert Mueller, the Justice Department special counsel investigating possible ties between the Russian government and the Trump campaign.

After losing a job, what's the best strategy for getting insurance? Are Republicans planning to change Medicare benefits as part of their changes to the federal health law? And will entrepreneurs be able to get insurance easily if that GOP overhaul goes forward? This week I answer these questions from readers.

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Cabinet Members Heap Praise On Trump

Jun 13, 2017

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This next story is amazing. I mean, it's incredible, the most fantastic story from any news source in decades. OK, that's an overstatement, but it is a story filled with praise. Our spectacular White House correspondent Tamara Keith reports on a Cabinet meeting.

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Robert Mueller is the man in charge of investigating possible links between Russia and President Trump's campaign associates.

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As Virginia voters go to the polls Tuesday to pick their nominees for governor, President Trump has cast a shadow over both parties' primaries in very different ways.

The nation's top legal officer is set to go before Congress on Tuesday to try to defuse a bomb that the former FBI director dropped into his lap.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is scheduled to appear before the Senate Intelligence Committee less than one week after James Comey told the committee he could not discuss openly certain information about Sessions' recusal from the investigation into Russia's election meddling last year.

The U.S. Supreme Court has struck down a federal law based on what the justices called "stunning stereotypes" — among them that most men care little about their children born out of wedlock.

Under the law, a child born abroad to an unwed American mother automatically becomes a U.S. citizen if the mother previously lived in the U.S. for a period of at least one year.

In contrast, the child of an unwed father can't become a U.S. citizen unless the father has lived in the U.S. for a continuous period of five years, two of them when he was over the age of 14.

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is recommending that the boundaries of the Bears Ears National Monument in Utah be shrunk. He also is calling on Congress to give Native American tribes more say in how the new monument is managed.

Updated at 8:19 p.m. ET

President Trump is preparing to announce changes in U.S. policy toward Cuba, possibly tightening restrictions on travel and trade that were loosened under former President Barack Obama.

Trump is expected to announce the changes in Miami on Friday.

The move was confirmed by a congressional source with direct knowledge of the situation.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., has been leading the push for a more restrictive policy, along with his fellow Cuban-American, Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla.

In name and in aim, it's a bill for our political moment.

Ladies and gentlemen, Rep. Mike Quigley of Illinois presents: the Communications Over Various Feeds Electronically for Engagement, or COVFEFE Act.

As Congress has taught us time and again, any legislative priority can be pretzeled into an acronym if you simply toss away the conventions of standard American English.

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Montana's newly elected congressman pleaded guilty today to assaulting a journalist. The judge sentenced Republican Greg Gianforte to community service and anger management counseling. Montana Public Radio's Corin Cates-Carney reports from Bozeman.

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In Virginia, tomorrow is a primary election day. The governorship is the biggest office up for grabs. And the contest on the Democratic side is also seen as a referendum on the direction of the Democratic Party itself. Here's NPR's Don Gonyea.

Can states force President Trump to sell off his businesses?

That question is being raised by a new legal challenge to Trump's continued ownership of far-flung businesses.

On Monday, the attorneys general for Maryland and the District of Columbia filed a lawsuit in a Maryland federal court, saying that Trump's failure to sell off his interests in hotels, golf courses, office buildings and other properties is undermining public trust and violating the U.S. Constitution's Emoluments Clause.

Last year’s shooting at the Pulse nightclub was the nation’s deadliest terror attack since 9-11. Some in the LGBT community began raising money to take on the NRA

As the country marks this anniversary, are LGBT people any better protected from gun violence? LGBT activism and the gun control debate one year after the Pulse nightclub shooting.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” another day of "Must-Watch TV" on tap for tomorrow as Attorney General Jeff Sessions will testify in an open hearing. What will he say and will he invoke executive privilege?

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