Health & Science

Ways to Connect

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On Monday morning, the employees of a Louisville, Colo., office arrived to a confusing scene.

Two glass doors of their office were smashed, suggesting a break-in — but nothing was missing.

A review of the security footage shows a goat appearing hell-bent on breaking through the Argonics Inc. office doors.

California's Obamacare exchange scrubbed its annual rate announcement this week, the latest sign of how the ongoing political drama over the Affordable Care Act is roiling insurance markets nationwide.

Tymia McCullough fidgets in front of a mirror in her hotel room as her mom, Susie Pitts, puts the final touches on her hair and nervously drills her on what she is going to say when she gets to Capitol Hill.

"And this is where you let them know that Medicaid is what?" Pitts asks.

"Health assurance," Tymia responds.

"Health insurance that does what?"

"It pays for the need to see your doctor," Tymia says.

Tymia is just 11 years old. She came to Washington last week to lobby Congress over health care. Her family saw it as a life-or-death fight.

Chances are, you’ve already encountered artificial intelligence today.

Did your email spam filter keep junk out of your inbox? Did you find this site through Google? Did you encounter a targeted ad on your way?

Guardians Of The Gridlock

Jul 19, 2017

The legislative logjam known as the GOP health care bill is stunning, considering Republicans are in power in the House, Senate and White House. If today’s lawmakers can’t work together to move ahead on health care, what can they do?

Perhaps they can take notes on how major federal legislation of Washington past — like the Voting Rights Act of 1965 or the Affordable Care Act — made it through controversy and Congress and landed on the President’s desk.

GUESTS

On Aug. 21, a narrow, 70-mile wide swath of the United States from Oregon to South Carolina will be the stage for one of the most (if not the most) spectacular celestial events, a total eclipse of the sun.

Space.com has put together a nice informational guide, including a video and a map explaining where to go, what to expect, and how to watch it safely. This is the first total solar eclipse in America in almost 40 years. The next one in the U.S. will be on April 8, 2024.

Updated at 12:40 p.m. ET

New Hampshire police had to contend with some unlikely fugitives on the lam on Tuesday: a small herd of bison.

As many as 16 of the massive animals fled a farm owned by Armand Bolduc, busting through a fence in the morning. For several hours, the bison were "scared and running" through front lawns, forests and busy roadways, according to the Gilford Police Department.

"It's terrible; it's a bad situation." That is how the creator of that situation, YouTube star Jake Paul, describes what his neighbors in West Hollywood are going through because of his rowdy lifestyle and made-for-video antics.

Why Zika Is Especially Hard On The Women Of Brazil

Jul 19, 2017

Did the Zika virus put a heavier burden on women than it did on men when the virus swept through Brazil?

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Elon Musk is warning that artificial intelligence is a "fundamental existential risk for human civilization," and Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper is looking into how states can respond.

In nursing homes and residential facilities around the world, health care workers are increasingly asking dementia patients questions: What are your interests? How do you want to address us? What should we do to celebrate the life of a friend who has passed away?

The questions are part of an approach to care aimed at giving people with memory loss and other cognitive problems a greater sense of control and independence. At its core is the idea that an individual with dementia should be treated as a whole person and not "just" a patient.

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There's a good chance you're hungry for information you didn't even know you wanted, but Google knows — and the tech giant is going to spoon-feed it to you.

Google is following in Facebook's footsteps, with plans to redesign its popular search page on mobile phones so that you'll get something similar to the social media site's news feed. Only Google's will just be called "feed."

Chipotle saw its stock dip Tuesday after it temporarily closed a Sterling, Va., restaurant where several people reported getting sick.

"That is an especially sensitive issue for Chipotle, which struggled with recurring problems with foodborne illness two years ago that caused its stock price to plummet," NPR's Yuki Noguchi told our Newscast unit. "Investors showed signs of nervousness again today, with the stock losing, at one point, more than 7.5 percent in value."

It's the famine that not enough people have heard about.

An estimated 20 million people in four countries — Somalia, South Sudan, Nigeria and Yemen — are at risk of famine and starvation. And the word isn't getting out, says Justin Forsyth, a deputy executive director of UNICEF.

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In an essay on Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf observed, "Of all great writers she is the most difficult to catch in the act of greatness."

To that double-edged and astute assessment, one can add, she is also the most difficult to catch in the act of tea-time.

This observation might seem irksomely contrarian to the legions of Janeites in hats and bonnets gathered around tea and scones to pay fealty to the novelist on the bicentenary of her death, which falls today.

Dogs are cute. Baby deer are arguably even cuter. So what could be more heroic and life-affirming than a dog saving the life of a fawn?

Storm, an English golden retriever, was out for a walk Sunday morning along the Long Island Sound with fellow dog Sara and his owner, Mark Freeley.

Amid the lapping waves, a baby deer was in over its head out in the sound.

"Storm just plunged into the water and started swimming out to the fawn," Freeley told CBS New York.

The rise of artificial intelligence poses its fair share of dangers. Last year, for instance, physicist Stephen Hawking said its development could be "either the best or the worst thing ever to happen to humanity." And just this weekend, Tesla CEO Elon Musk described AI as a potential "existential threat" to human civilization.

Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET

Hours after a replacement for the Affordable Care Act was all but scuttled by a clutch of Senate Republicans, three lawmakers appear to have doomed Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's Plan B: Repeal the Affordable Care Act without replacing it.

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