News

GPB Evening Headlines For Monday June 11, 2018

Jun 11, 2018


In this week’s Medical Minute, Dr. Joseph Hobbs, chairman of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, discusses how the protein MGP can be used to identify dialysis patients most at risk for associated cardiovascular disease. 


Moultrie Creek / Flickr

The Federal Reserve's roots trace back to Georgia’s Jekyll Island. It all started in November 1910, when  six men secretly convened at the Jekyll Island Club to reform the country's banking system. The participants did not admit that the meeting happened until the 1930s.


Ellen Eldridge / GPB News

The effects of the first named storm of 2018 claimed lives before the official start of hurricane season, but leaders with Georgia Power, the National Weather Service and the Georgia Emergency Management Agency have been investing in technology, planning and preparing.

Despite advances in technology, the best resource for damage assessment after a storm is "boots on the ground," Georgia Power's David Maske said at a hurricane summit last week.


World Ocean Day was marked on Friday, June 8, 2018. This month is usually the start of Georgia shrimp season. But shrimp boats from St. Mary’s to Hilton Head are staying docked until the end of this month.  An unusually cold spring delayed spawning. Climate change and global warming are also creating problems. 

Marc Frischer is a professor and marine science researcher at the University of Georgia’s Skidaway Institute of Oceanography. He says ocean warming could affect the shrimp industry in a different way.

Chatham County Tops State In Number Of Bald Eagle Nests

Jun 11, 2018
seapaddler53, flickr.com

Chatham County leads the state for the number of bald eagle nests, wildlife officials say.

This year's count of 27 nests tops the county’s previous lead of 22, and includes a rare ground nest found on Cabbage Island.

The county, which is home to Savannah, is about 250 miles southeast of Atlanta.

Officials believe 65 to 80 percent of nests made are expected to be successful, according to Georgia’s Department of Natural Resources.

GPB Evening Headlines For June 8, 2018

Jun 8, 2018

  • Republican candidate for governor Casey Cagle appears to be caught on tape saying he pushed a bill he didn't like through the Senate so an opponent would lose out on millions in support.
  • A highway reopened more than a month after a plane crash killed nine National Guard airmen from Puerto Rico.
  • Seventeen alumni are suing a school in North Georgia.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

It’s summertime and peak moving season. But it’s also prime time for consumer fraud, according to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

Last year the Peach State was in the top 10 for moving fraud, according to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s Raymond Martinez.


  • Record-Breaking Number Of Guns Confiscated At Atlanta Airport In May
  • Cold Weather Cause For Shrimp Season Delay
  • Medical Board Suspends 'YouTube-Singing' Dermatologist


Ellen Eldridge / GPB News

The centuries old art of busking — or performing in public places for tips — is currently encouraged in Decatur.

The city is trying out a program that makes it easy to get a permit and take art and music to the streets.


David Goldman / AP Photo/File

In the midst of ongoing investigations involving bribery and open records violations at Atlanta City Hall, the mayor's office is explaining why taxpayers were wrongly charged more than $2,000 for a plane ticket for the mayor's husband Derrick Bottoms — who is a vice president at The Home Depot, not a city employee.

Viola Davis

More women are running for elected office this fall. The number of female candidates for U.S. Congress has doubled since 2016.

In Georgia, DeKalb County activist Viola Davis launched a last minute campaign to unseat her longtime representative in last month's primary election — and she won.

GPB’s Stephen Fowler has been following the midterm elections, and he joined Rickey Bevington in the studio to talk about this race and the greater context of women running for office.


  •  Cobb County Faces Budget Shortage
  • New Study Suggests Changes To SNAP Program
  • City Of Atlanta Moves Forward With Plans To Demolish Blight

GPB News

Congress tacked the Family First Act onto a bill to fund the government earlier this year. The move shifts the bulk of federal foster care funding from residential care to preventative services. It takes effect in October 2019.

The goal is to keep kids at home using parent training and treatment for substance abuse and mental health. Alison Evans is the CEO of the Methodist Home in Macon where 80 foster children live. She said the act’s fine print fails to consider whether the state is equipped to provide these services.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

There’s something people think they know about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as SNAP.

It’s the idea that people who use what we used to call food stamps spend their once monthly benefits on groceries almost immediately after they get them. When you look at averages, that’s true, and for some it can mean some lean and hungry days at the end of the month before the next round of SNAP benefits.

 

 


In this week’s Medical Minute, Dr. Joseph Hobbs, chairman of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, discusses how a daily dose of baking soda could one day help reduce the ravages of autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.

The Medical Minute airs at 8:18 a.m., 1:20 p.m. and 5:18 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday on the 17 GPB radio stations across Georgia. For more Medical Minute episodes, visit the GPB Augusta SoundCloud page.


Office of Attorney General

The Georgia attorney general's office does not intend to criminally charge the city of Atlanta for open records violations at City Hall, officials said.

A letter written by an assistant to Attorney General Chris Carr said the city won't be charged with violating Georgia's open records laws, the Associated Press reports.

However, the letter obtained by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and WSB-TV also says individuals could be prosecuted if evidence supports it.

Atlanta Police Department

In March, hackers attacked Atlanta’s computer network. They held data hostage for a $51,000 ransom, which the city didn’t pay.

The group SamSam was identified in the ransom note. It’s known for choosing targets with weak security and high incentives to regain control of their information.


GPB Evening Headlines For Monday June 4, 2018

Jun 4, 2018

  • Supreme Court Ruling On Colorado Baker Could Impact Georgia
  • Atlanta Cyberattack Fallout Continues As Dashcam Footage Is Lost
  • DeKalb County Schools Sue City Of Atlanta Over 


GPB News / Emily Cureton

In April three dozen members of a neo-Nazi group rallied in Newnan,  south of Atlanta. Hundreds showed up to counter protest. Police report no one was injured, but the day raised questions about who pays for free speech when it endangers public safety.  Local governments spent more than $200,000 to keep the peace.


Pages