Author Karl Ove Knausgaard — known for his six-volume autobiographical series, My Struggle — has embarked on a brand new multi-part project. Autumn, the first in a four-part quartet, is a collection of texts, each focused on a single subject.

In these short studies, Knausgaard considers a wide variety of tangible and intangible topics — apples, wasps, silence, jellyfish, fingers, forgiveness, dawn.

The four suspected members of a terror cell — the only members believed to be alive — appeared in a Madrid court Tuesday in connection with the attacks in Spain last week that killed 15 people.

The hearing took place behind closed doors. But numerous Spanish and international news outlets say multiple suspects testified that a former imam was the mastermind of a failed plot to use explosives in a large-scale attack.

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California's record drought is officially over. But all over the states, trees are still dying. They've been badly weakened by years without water. From member station KPCC, Emily Guerin has a story of a community living in a dead forest.

If you're a woman, there's a good chance you've used Johnson's Baby Powder at some point. It smells good, and it can keep you dry.

But is it dangerous?

Dr. Daniel Cramer says yes. He's a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. He says talc — the mineral in talcum powder — can cause ovarian cancer.

"Overall, women may increase their risk in general by about 33 percent by using talc in their hygiene," Cramer says.

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President Trump spoke of a regional approach to the conflict in Afghanistan last night, including a pledge to further develop the U.S. strategic partnership with India.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Congressman Ruben Gallego represents Phoenix and the surrounding area. He's a Democrat and joins us now from his district office. Congressman, thanks for joining us.

RUBEN GALLEGO: Thank you for having me.

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In the wake of congressional Republicans' failure to pass a health care bill, two governors from different parties are going to bring their own ideas to Washington.

Grayson, Kentucky, cafeteria manager Jason Smith didn’t have any formal culinary training, but he had a dream: to be a Food Network star. After 10 weeks of cooking, food demonstrations and exuding plenty of Southern charm, Smith’s dream came true.

Selling rhino horn internationally has been illegal for 40 years. But it’s now legal to sell rhino horn within the borders of South Africa, the country with 80 percent of the world’s rhinos. A court there removed a moratorium on the domestic rhino horn trade earlier this year.

As NPR’s Peter Granitz (@pgranitz) reports from the capital, Pretoria, one rhino farmer in South Africa hopes to auction some of his stockpiled rhino horn — and the sale is not without controversy.

Already this year, more than 6,000 people have illegally walked across the U.S. border into Quebec. Nearly half of them crossed last month. One of the most popular illegal border crossing areas is in Vermont just west of Lake Champlain, along a rural road in the woods.

Vermont Public Radio’s Kathleen Masterson (@kathmasterson) went to the border crossing spot, and has this report.

Brent Deppe is taking me on a tour of the farm supply business, called Key Cooperative, that he helps to manage in Grinnell, Iowa. We step though the back door of one warehouse, and our view of the sky is blocked by a gigantic round storage tank, painted white.

"This is the liquid nitrogen tank," Deppe explains. "It's a million-and-a-half gallon tank."

Nitrogen is the essential ingredient for growing corn and most other crops. Farmers around here spread it on their fields by the truckload.

German police stopped a vehicle Saturday night, only to find the father and son inside allegedly hauling a heap of ecstasy. The roughly 5,000 pills packed in a handful of bags had a street value of nearly $46,000, according to authorities in Osnabrück.

A big catch, to be sure — but that's not the weird part. When they took a closer look, they saw a familiar face staring back.

How Will America's Longest War End?

18 hours ago

With guest host Stephen Henderson.

President Trump addresses the nation Monday night about the war in Afghanistan, where more than 8,000 U.S. troops are stationed. A resolution to the conflict has defied solutions so far.

U.S. Defense Secretary General James Mattis told Congress in June “we are not winning in Afghanistan right now.” What will it take to bring this conflict to an end? And is the president’s “path forward” for U.S. engagement in Afghanistan and South Asia the answer?

GUESTS

With guest host Stephen Henderson.

Our decisions about what to eat are driven by much more than hunger. Social trends, agricultural science and multimillion-dollar industries can make certain vegetables hip or carbs passé, while concerns for overall health sit on the sidelines.

Muslim men in India will no longer be able to terminate their marriages in a matter of moments, after a split decision by the country's Supreme Court overruled the practice of "triple talaq."

Previously, Muslim men (and only men) could irrevocably end their marriages by repeating "talaq," the Arabic word for "divorce," three times. Women's rights advocates in India have fought to end the practice.

Six years after a fatal crash caused China to throttle back its high-speed rail service, the country is relaunching the world's fastest inter-city lines, including one between Beijing and Shanghai that cuts an hour off the current travel time.

The operating speed of the new bullet trains, known as "Fuxing," or "Rejuvenation," will be 217 mph, according to Chinese media.

It was not until his late 20s that Vincent Doyle discovered that his dead godfather, a priest based central Ireland, was in fact his biological father. And Doyle, a Catholic himself, says that startling discovery inspired in him an abiding mission: to offer support to other children of Roman Catholic priests, who are bound by a vow of celibacy — and to ensure the church supports them, too.

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What if I told you there was a way to use technology to save an estimated $100 billion to $300 billion dollars a year in health care spending in the U.S.? That's the estimated cost incurred because people don't take the medications they're prescribed.

Flatt Lonesome On Mountain Stage

20 hours ago

Spirited bluegrass band Flatt Lonesome makes its debut on Mountain Stage, recorded live at the Augusta Heritage Festival in Elkins, W.Va. After singing and harmonizing in their family's bluegrass gospel group Sandy Creek Revival, siblings Kelsi, Buddy and Charli Robertson took to the open road with their talented friends to do as their band's name suggests: honor the string-and-song work of Lester Flatt with a lonesome sound that is emotional, earthy and entirely down-home.

The horror of recent events was a wake-up call for many Americans about the rise of American groups dedicated to the tenets of fascism.

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