Adam Ragusea

Backup host "On Second Thought"

Adam is host of Current's podcast, "The Pub." He's a Journalist in Residence and Visiting Assistant Professor of Journalism at the Center for Collaborative Journalism at Mercer University in Macon, Ga. He’s also reported for public radio shows including "Morning Edition," "All Things Considered," "Here & Now," "Marketplace" and "The Takeaway." Before becoming a journalist, Adam studied music composition, and he creates all the music for "The Pub."

Ways to Connect

Freddy Cole

At this weekend’s Atlanta Jazz Festival, singer Freddy Cole takes the stage. Cole is the younger brother of jazz great Nat King Cole. Freddy released an album last year called "He  Was  The King,"  a tribute to his brother, Nat. We talked with Freddy about his storied career, and his brother’s legacy. 

Peter Mountain / Walt Disney Pictures

The Breakroom gang joins guest host Adam Ragusea to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes Ed Sohn of Thomson Reuters, Fayette County Commissioner Steve Brown, Savannah Magazine editor Amy Condon, and Amber Scott of the non-profit Leap Year.

 

Alix Blair

For many veterans returning from war, it can be difficult to adjust to civilian life. A new documentary premiering on PBS on Memorial Day tells the story of one veteran who has suffered emotionally and physically from war, only to return home as a farmer where he’s trying to find peace. The film previously ran at the Macon Film Festival last summer. 

PremierofAlberta / Foter

The Good Samaritan bill became Georgia law three years ago. The bill equips first responders with the drug Naloxone to reverse opioid overdoses, and gives amnesty to those who report drug related health emergencies. We talk about results of the law with Georgia Health News Editor Andy Miller, and Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition Ambassador Mona Bennett.

Charles McNair

Once upon a time, magazines published novels one chapter at a time. Now author Charles McNair is bringing the novel back to bite-sized form in the Atlanta-based magazine, The Bitter Southerner. Each week, he releases another chapter of “The Epicureans.” We asked Charles to take a break from writing and tell us about his creative process.

GPB

New research from the Southern Poverty Law Center and Emory University finds cases of alleged bias in the Atlanta Immigration Court. The AIC denies asylum to 98 percent of seekers, by far the highest rate of any immigration court in the nation.

The Good Samaritan bill became Georgia law three years ago. The bill equips first responders with the drug Naloxone to reverse opioid overdoses, and gives amnesty to those who report drug related health emergencies. We talk about results of the law with Georgia Health News Editor Andy Miller, and Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition Ambassador Mona Bennett.

Memaw's At LG's Restaurant

Georgia leads Southern states in hospitality, according to a recent survey from Twiddy.com. What does Southern Hospitality really mean?

Photo Courtesy of Georgia Tech

NASA announced last month it will recruit a team of Georgia Tech researchers for a new project. The team, called REVEALS, will study radiation on other planets and build radiation proof space suits. What can this technology do for us in space exploration?

We ask the team leader, Thomas Orlando, a Director in the Center for Space Technology and Research at Georgia Tech.

NASA announced last month it will recruit a team of Georgia Tech researchers for a new project. The team, called REVEALS, will study radiation on other planets and build radiation proof space suits. What can this technology do for us in space exploration? We ask the team leader, Thomas Orlando, a Director in the Center for Space Technology and Research at Georgia Tech.

"Mr. Tuck & the 13 Heroes" is a new children's book about the first school in Henry County to desegregate black and white students. In 1966, Fairview Elementary accepted 13 students of color--an effort led by then principal, Brooks Tuck. The author of the book is John Harris, whose father was friends with Mr. Tuck. We talked with Harris, along with the illustrator, his daughter Sophie Harris.

Audi USA / Foter

The autonomous vehicle industry may soon find a home in Atlanta. That’s because the city is one of three global cities chosen for the "Safer Roads Challenge." That effort brings together manufacturing and tech companies with the common goal of making traffic safer. Part of that initiative is the implementation of self-driving cars.

With us is Faye DiMassimo, General Manager of the Renew Atlanta Bond, and Michael Hunter, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Tech.

Brad Clinesmith / Foter

The motor vehicle death rate in Georgia has jumped by more than 30 percent since 2014. That’s the fifth highest jump in the nation, where fatalities comparatively rose only 14 percent. Those numbers come from a National Safety Council study released last month. The top three killers: speed, alcohol, and distraction.

We invited Natalie Dale, spokeswoman for the Georgia Department of Transportation, to shed some light on this.

Photo courtesy of John Harris

"Mr. Tuck And the 13 Heroes" is a new children's book about the first elementary school in Henry County to desegregate black and white students. In 1966, Fairview Elementary accepted thirteen students of color--an effort led by then principal, Brooks Tuck.

The author of the book is John Harris, whose father was friends with Mr. Tuck. We spoke with Harris along with the illustrator, his daughter Sophie Harris.

PBS

Tony Award-winning actor Alan Cumming loves the musical “Cabaret.” He starred in a performance in London’s West End, and he’s played the smarmy emcee twice on Broadway. He’s on tour now, not with the musical "Cabaret" but with an actual cabaret: “Alan Cumming Sings Sappy Songs.” "On Second Thought" guest host Adam Ragusea talked with him ahead of his performance Friday at 8pm at Atlanta Symphony Hall.

Macon-Bibb County officials have met in the past year to discuss why there are so many pedestrian fatalities in the area. The Georgia Department of Public Health found the county has the second highest rate of pedestrian deaths in the state. We speak with Macon-Bibb Board of Health member Chris Tsavatewa about what needs to be done to address this problem. We also hear from Angie Schmitt, editor of Streetsblog USA, about how pedestrian fatalities look across the country.

The Breakroom gang is back in action. We talk about why people feel the need to raid grocery stores before an impending storm, how ParkAtlanta has issued tons of bogus parking tickets, and the Pope’s recent decision to give the go-ahead for women to breastfeed in church.

National Park Service

The Ocmulgee National Monument near Macon was designated this month as a National Treasure by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The most prominent features at Ocmulgee are huge earthen mounds that spread across 700 acres. Native Americans first settled there thousands of years ago.

Google Images

Every Friday, it’s time to hang out in The Breakroom. Guest host Adam Ragusea and this week’s panel talk about whether the electoral college should be scrapped, how Facebook and Google say they’re trying to stop the spread of “fake news,” and Oxford’s word of the year: “post-truth.”

 

This week’s guests:

Southern rock band Drive-by Truckers was co-founded by friends Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley in 1996. They still call Athens home, but they're now on an international tour to promote their latest album, "American Band." We talk with Hood talks about the new album, and his role as musician in a politically tumultuous time. 

Two weeks. That’s all we have to go until Election Day. All eyes are focused on the battle for the presidency, but you need to look further down the ballot to find the races that most affect you.   Bill Nigut, host of GPB’s “Political Rewind” and “Two Way Street,” stops by to talk about down-ballot races and what to expect in Georgia on November 8th.

Break It Down: Cognitive Dissonance

Oct 25, 2016
Stuart Mudie / Flickr

Sometimes people won’t – or don’t – change their minds, even when they’re presented with evidence showing their views aren’t based in fact. One reason why is a psychological term called cognitive dissonance.  

You may hear more and more about cognitive dissonance as we get closer to the election. It's a term used to explain politics all the time. But it's something that not a lot of people really understand. 

Michael Rivera / Wikimedia Commons

Within the span of two months in 2015, four children living in or near Waycross, GA were diagnosed with similar types of very rare and aggressive cancers. Three of the four have the very same cancer, and one little girl had a kind that’s even more rare. She recently lost her battle with the disease.

Their families and the community are still struggling to find out why and what, if anything, is being done to make sure other people don’t get sick.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

A new book has fueled the indoor-outdoor cat debate by calling for the removal of all outdoor cats by any means necessary. The authors say feral and outdoor domestic cats are a threat to wildlife.

More than 15 million people in the United States deal with social anxiety disorder. SAD is an extreme fear  of being scrutinized and judged in social situations.  For people who deal with social anxiety, it can be a paralyzing part of their everyday life. Georgia State psychology professor Page Anderson has developed a new technology to help people with social anxiety by using virtual reality. Her technology simulates real life settings and helps patients treat their anxiety virtually before confronting real-world situations.

One aspect of college football has received a significant deal of negative attention: “guarantee games.” These are matchups where a large school pays a smaller school a significant sum of money to schedule a matchup against them. Some claim that historically black colleges and universities are often forced to take guarantee games to help fund their struggling athletic departments, which puts players at risk against unfair competition.

PIXBAY

Over fifteen million people in the United States deal with social anxiety disorder. SAD is an extreme fear  of being scrutinized and judged in social situations. For people who deal with social anxiety, it can be a paralyzing part of their everyday life. Georgia State psychology professor Page Anderson has developed a new technology to help people with social anxiety by using virtual reality. Her technology simulates real life settings and helps patients treat their anxiety virtually before confronting real-world situations.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

You may have heard about the Iron Pipeline. It's an underground network used to ship guns from states like Georgia with relatively lax gun laws to other states with tighter regulations. Many of these weapons are purchased legally in the South, but some are stolen. A new investigative report finds Atlanta has an alarming rate of guns stolen from cars.

WhenisCalendars.com/Google Images

On Fridays, we spend time in The Breakroom discuss the week’s news. Guest host Adam Ragusea and the panel talk about the high level of stress Americans say they feel over the election, a new private club where women can eat chicken wings without men around to judge them, and statistics that show police body cameras dramatically reduce the number of complaints by the public.

Our Breakroom guests this week:

The conclusion of the 2016 election season is less than three weeks away. Candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump faced off in their final head-to-head debate on Wednesday night. And now that the verbal jousting is over, it’s time for the voters to decide who will become the 45th President of the United States.  The Atlanta Journal-Constitution will release their final poll of Georgia voters Friday morning. Political reporter Greg Bluestein joins us to talk about the results of the poll and how Georgia voters are feeling about the election.

Pages