Adam Ragusea

Backup host "On Second Thought"

Adam is host of Current's podcast, "The Pub." He's a Journalist in Residence and Visiting Assistant Professor of Journalism at the Center for Collaborative Journalism at Mercer University in Macon, Ga. He’s also reported for public radio shows including "Morning Edition," "All Things Considered," "Here & Now," "Marketplace" and "The Takeaway." Before becoming a journalist, Adam studied music composition, and he creates all the music for "The Pub."

Ways to Connect

Ryan McFadin / GPB

The Breakroom returns! We discuss silent protests at NFL games, Trump’s antagonizing North Korea, and Twitter’s decision to expand the length of tweets to 280 characters. We also remember some hard goodbyes, Saudi Arabia, and critique HuffPost’s Atlanta Playlist. Joining us this week are Roxanne Donovan, Hector Fernandez, Tomika DePriest, and Greg Williams.

 

 

In the wake of back-to-back natural disasters, there’s doubt about the willingness and ability of insurance companies to handle a flood of claims for destroyed property. We sit down with an investigative reporter for the Atlanta Journal Constitution, Carrie Teegardin, to discuss her in-depth reporting, part of our occasional series, “AJC Investigates.”  We add two more tunes to our ever-growing Georgia Playlist. Evan Leima is the frontman and singer for Athens-based Dream Culture. They perform at Seeds of Sound Festival in Sparta this Saturday, Sept.

Cat ownership is subject to a lot of debate. Inside or outside, claws or no? We’ll hear how GPB’s Sean Powers comes nose to nose with the conflict, then we talk with Barbara King, an Emerita Professor of Anthropology at the College of William and Mary, about the ethics of cat ownership.

Athens-based band, Drive-by Truckers was co-founded by friends Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley in 1996. We revisit an interview with Patterson Hood about the band’s latest album, “American Band,” before Drive-by Truckers play this Friday, Sept. 29, at Atlanta’s Variety Playhouse.

Twillio

Atlanta gets more robocalls than any other city in the United States. If that’s not bad enough, in August the city broke its own record for the number of times mass marketers, pre-recorded commercial pests, pleaders, and politicians annoyed people via phone in one month. On top of that, Hurricane Irma only made this problem worse. Maureen Mahoney, Public Policy Fellow at Consumers Union joins us.

Indigo Girls -- no “the” -- have been hits since their first release in 1985. One of the most successful and influential Georgia-formed groups, the folk rock pair have gone platinum and won a Grammy, too. They have a show tonight, Sept. 27, at Atlanta Symphony Hall with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. We revisit an interview with one half of the group, Amy Ray.

The Atlanta Music Project

American orchestras have a diversity problem. People of color make up only about four percent of the musicians in U.S. symphonies. The Atlanta Music Project is looking to change that. They provide free instruments and lessons to underserved kids in southwest Atlanta, in the hopes of getting them interested in classical music careers.

Atlanta History Center

Former Spelman College President Beverly Daniel Tatum  is on a long quest to understand of psychology of racism. In 1997, she wrote a book about called ”Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria: And Other Conversations About Race.” Twenty years later, Tatum has updated the book. We talk with her ahead of an appearance Tuesday night, September 26, at the Atlanta History Center.

Flickr

Last week President Trump disparaged professional football players for kneeling during the national anthem. The president’s comments generated gestures of unity at NFL games Sunday and Monday night. The Atlanta Falcons were among the many players, coaches and owners who locked arms during the anthem to protest racial injustice. Fifty years ago two Olympic athletes brought this kind of silent protest to the medal podium. Track stars Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists during the ceremony.

Last week President Trump disparaged professional football players for kneeling during the national anthem. The president’s comments generated gestures of unity at NFL games Sunday. The Atlanta Falcons were among the many players, coaches and owners who locked arms during the anthem to protest racial injustice. Fifty years ago two Olympic athletes brought this kind of silent protest to the medal podium. Track stars Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists during the ceremony.

Rounder Records

Before Gregg Allman passed away this summer, he recorded an album packed with new material. The posthumously released “Southern Blood” came out earlier this month. The heart-shattering album reflects on Allman's life as his terminal illness overtook him. We listen to the record and talk with Allman's longtime friend Chank Middleton and Allman's guitarist and band leader Scott Sharrard.

Kevin D. Liles / AP Photo

When Georgia Tech student Scout Schultz was killed, the Schultz family said lethal force by officer Tyler Beck could have been avoided. The state of Georgia started to require crisis intervention training for officers in February of 2017.

Historic Savannah Foundation

Cuyler-Brownville is one of Savannah’s oldest African-American neighborhoods, having earned its official historic status two decades ago. But since then, over 100 historic properties have been demolished, including at least eight neighborhood homes dating back to the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Does historic designation actually drive demolitions?

David Goldman / AP Photo

Georgia Tech student Scout Schultz was shot and killed after provoking campus police officers. Schultz had a history of mental health issues and suicide attempts.

Georgia Tech student Scout Schultz was shot and killed after provoking campus police officers. Schultz had a history of mental health issues and suicide attempts. Anxiety and depression are common in high pressure schools like Georgia Tech. We talk about the mental health of college students with Tim Elmore, President of Growing Leaders, which works to raise awareness of mental health in young adults. Also joining us is Collin Spencer, External Relations Committee Chair for the Mental Health Student Coalition at Georgia Tech.

The Breakroom returns to discuss the week’s news, including the success of the horror film “IT” and Harvard admissions. We’ll also talk about Amazon’s new HQ, and the Equifax hack. Joining us in the Breakroom are Hector Fernandez, Tomika DePriest. Stephen Brown, and Christian Zsilavetz.

The B-52s made it big. And the iconic band from Athens takes the stage in their home state tonight, Sept. 15, at the Atlanta Symphony Hall. We revisit an interview with founding member Kate Pierson.

Hurricane Irma put a lot of lives on hold. But for Jacob Gmitter of Lakeland, Florida, there was one thing that just couldn’t wait. GPB reporter Grant Blankenship brings us the story of a young saxophonist on the road.

Darren Michaels / Netflix

Imagine being in outer space with two sassy robots, and being forced to watch really bad science fiction movies with them. That’s the premise of the cult classic TV series, Mystery Science Theater 3000. The show is on the road on Aug. 12 at Atlanta Symphony Hall. We talked with series creator, Joel Hodgson.

Freddy Cole

At this weekend’s Atlanta Jazz Festival, singer Freddy Cole takes the stage. Cole is the younger brother of jazz great Nat King Cole. Freddy released an album last year called "He  Was  The King,"  a tribute to his brother, Nat. We talked with Freddy about his storied career, and his brother’s legacy. 

Peter Mountain / Walt Disney Pictures

The Breakroom gang joins guest host Adam Ragusea to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes Ed Sohn of Thomson Reuters, Fayette County Commissioner Steve Brown, Savannah Magazine editor Amy Condon, and Amber Scott of the non-profit Leap Year.

 

Alix Blair

For many veterans returning from war, it can be difficult to adjust to civilian life. A new documentary premiering on PBS on Memorial Day tells the story of one veteran who has suffered emotionally and physically from war, only to return home as a farmer where he’s trying to find peace. The film previously ran at the Macon Film Festival last summer. 

PremierofAlberta / Foter

The Good Samaritan bill became Georgia law three years ago. The bill equips first responders with the drug Naloxone to reverse opioid overdoses, and gives amnesty to those who report drug related health emergencies. We talk about results of the law with Georgia Health News Editor Andy Miller, and Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition Ambassador Mona Bennett.

Charles McNair

Once upon a time, magazines published novels one chapter at a time. Now author Charles McNair is bringing the novel back to bite-sized form in the Atlanta-based magazine, The Bitter Southerner. Each week, he releases another chapter of “The Epicureans.” We asked Charles to take a break from writing and tell us about his creative process.

GPB

New research from the Southern Poverty Law Center and Emory University finds cases of alleged bias in the Atlanta Immigration Court. The AIC denies asylum to 98 percent of seekers, by far the highest rate of any immigration court in the nation.

The Good Samaritan bill became Georgia law three years ago. The bill equips first responders with the drug Naloxone to reverse opioid overdoses, and gives amnesty to those who report drug related health emergencies. We talk about results of the law with Georgia Health News Editor Andy Miller, and Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition Ambassador Mona Bennett.

Memaw's At LG's Restaurant

Georgia leads Southern states in hospitality, according to a recent survey from Twiddy.com. What does Southern Hospitality really mean?

Photo Courtesy of Georgia Tech

NASA announced last month it will recruit a team of Georgia Tech researchers for a new project. The team, called REVEALS, will study radiation on other planets and build radiation proof space suits. What can this technology do for us in space exploration?

We ask the team leader, Thomas Orlando, a Director in the Center for Space Technology and Research at Georgia Tech.

NASA announced last month it will recruit a team of Georgia Tech researchers for a new project. The team, called REVEALS, will study radiation on other planets and build radiation proof space suits. What can this technology do for us in space exploration? We ask the team leader, Thomas Orlando, a Director in the Center for Space Technology and Research at Georgia Tech.

"Mr. Tuck & the 13 Heroes" is a new children's book about the first school in Henry County to desegregate black and white students. In 1966, Fairview Elementary accepted 13 students of color--an effort led by then principal, Brooks Tuck. The author of the book is John Harris, whose father was friends with Mr. Tuck. We talked with Harris, along with the illustrator, his daughter Sophie Harris.

Audi USA / Foter

The autonomous vehicle industry may soon find a home in Atlanta. That’s because the city is one of three global cities chosen for the "Safer Roads Challenge." That effort brings together manufacturing and tech companies with the common goal of making traffic safer. Part of that initiative is the implementation of self-driving cars.

With us is Faye DiMassimo, General Manager of the Renew Atlanta Bond, and Michael Hunter, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Tech.

Brad Clinesmith / Foter

The motor vehicle death rate in Georgia has jumped by more than 30 percent since 2014. That’s the fifth highest jump in the nation, where fatalities comparatively rose only 14 percent. Those numbers come from a National Safety Council study released last month. The top three killers: speed, alcohol, and distraction.

We invited Natalie Dale, spokeswoman for the Georgia Department of Transportation, to shed some light on this.

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