Adam Ragusea

Backup host "On Second Thought"

Adam is host of Current's podcast, "The Pub." He's a Journalist in Residence and Visiting Assistant Professor of Journalism at the Center for Collaborative Journalism at Mercer University in Macon, Ga. He’s also reported for public radio shows including "Morning Edition," "All Things Considered," "Here & Now," "Marketplace" and "The Takeaway." Before becoming a journalist, Adam studied music composition, and he creates all the music for "The Pub."

Ways to Connect

Georgia State University Library

In the Jim Crow South, there were some communities that integrated their police departments with African American officers. On one hand, these officers were authority figures who maintained law and order. On the other, they were denied basic human rights by the very communities they swore to protect.

pixabay

The U.S. Department of Justice sued Georgia last week for allegedly segregating and mistreating thousands of public school students, who are enrolled in a statewide program called GNETS.

AfterSchoolSatan.com

The Breakroom gang returns to talk about Satanic Temple members planning to start an after-school program at a Cobb County elementary school, a televangelist who bought Tyler Perry’s $17.5 million Buckhead mansion, and Donald Trump’s latest war of words, this time with the Muslim parents of a U.S. Army captain killed in Iraq.

Joining us for The Breakroom: 

BRYAN SELLS LAW

The small city of Sparta, Georgia made headlines this week. A lawsuit claims Hancock County and its Board of Elections systematically questioned the registrations of nearly 200 Sparta voters - most of whom are black. A quarter of the voters were removed from voter rolls. This electoral move would have required the pre-clearance from the federal government three years ago. But the Supreme Court struck down that provision, saying the mandate was outdated and unconstitutional.

The small city of Sparta, Georgia made headlines this week. A lawsuit claims Hancock County and its Board of Elections systematically questioned the registrations of nearly two hundred Sparta voters - most of whom are black. A quarter of the voters were removed from voter rolls. This electoral move would have required the pre-clearance from the federal government three years ago. But the Supreme Court struck down that provision, saying the mandate was outdated and unconstitutional.

The Brooklyn District Attorney's Office

Six Georgia men are facing federal charges for trafficking guns to New York. According to the 17-count indictment unsealed last week, half of the men are former military.

The U.S. Department of Justice indicted six Georgia men last week for trafficking guns to New York. The gun runners smuggled the weapons through an underground market known as the “Iron Pipeline.” The pipeline refers to Interstate 95, which connects states like New York with strict gun laws to Southern states like Georgia with less gun restrictions. We learn more about the Iron Pipeline and efforts to dismantle it with journalist Tina Susman and New York City Public Advocate Tish James.

 

Gullah Geechee On Screen

Aug 4, 2016
Julie Dash's 1991 "Daughters of the Dust" features a family in the Gullah community in 1902 South Carolina.

The first Gullah Geechee Heritage Film Festival kicks off this weekend in Horry County, South Carolina. The festival hopes to educate younger audiences and create opportunities to share Gullah narratives on-screen. We talk with Amy Kelly, one of the festival’s organizers, about how the Gullah community has been depicted in film.

WWE

Wrestling icon Jake ‘The Snake’ Roberts struggled with substance abuse in and out of the ring. Wrestler Diamond Dallas Page moved in with Roberts to help him get his life back on track. The documentary “The Resurrection of Jake ‘The Snake” chronicles their friendship and Roberts’ recovery.

We speak with the two wrestlers and director Steve Yu about the documentary.

You can find more information on the documentary here.

Georgia Congressman John Lewis wears many hats - civil rights leader, politician, and graphic memoirist. The story of the Civil Rights Movement is told through his eyes in a three part graphic memoir series called “March.” The final installment came out on Tuesday. We talk with Congressman Lewis, his co-author Andrew Aydin, and the books' illustrator Nate Powell about telling history through comics. We also talk with Rep. Lewis about his feelings on the Black Lives Matter movement and his quest to push for gun control.

Top Shelf Productions

Georgia Congressman John Lewis wears many hats - civil rights leader, politician, and graphic novelist. His story and the story of the civil rights movement is told through a three part graphic memoir called, “March.” The final installment of the series is out this week. We talk with Congressman Lewis, his co-author Andrew Aydin, and the book’s illustrator Nate Powell about telling history through comics.

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

Macon-Bibb County officials meet later this month to discuss why the rate of pedestrian fatalities is so high in the city. It’s either the most deadly or close to the most deadly county in the state for walkers, depending on how you count it. Chris Tsavatewa of the Macon-Bibb Board of Health tells us why he's made pedestrian safety a top issue.

Macon-Bibb Country officials meet this month to discuss why there are so many pedestrian fatalities in the area. The Georgia Department of Public Health found the county has the second highest rate of pedestrian deaths in the state. We speak with Macon-Bibb Board of Health member Chris Tsavatewa about what needs to be done to decrease the number of deaths. Then, we talk with Angie Schmitt, editor of Streetsblog USA, about how pedestrian fatalities look across the country. 

GA.EDU

The Georgia Cyber Academy is the state’s largest public school and one of the biggest virtual programs in the country. The academy received more than $80 million in public funding last year. But despite the investment, state officials gave the school a "D" grade after the school under performed in standardized testing. 

Pulitzer Peaches: Bill Dedman

Aug 1, 2016

2016 is the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prize. So we’ll spend some time with past winners who are connected to Georgia in a new series called, “Pulitzer Peaches.” We speak with investigative journalist Bill Dedman in the latest installment.

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