Bill Nigut

Host & Producer

Bill Nigut has been a program host and producer at Georgia Public Broadcasting since November, 2013. He currently hosts “Two Way Street,” a show that features long-form conversations with authors, artists, chefs, scientists and other creative people who have fascinating stories to tell. He is host and producer of “Political Rewind,” a twice-weekly political roundtable show featuring some of Georgia’s best-informed insiders weighing in on the big state and national political stories.

Bill spent 20 years as the national and state political correspondent for WSB-TV in Atlanta. In that role, he covered five presidential campaigns, traveling to Iowa, New Hampshire and other key primary states in each presidential election cycle. Bill also covered the White House and Capitol Hill for WSB, commuting from his home in Atlanta when major news stories were breaking in Washington, D.C. He grew up in Chicago, where he developed his love of rough and tumble politics and the Chicago Bears and Da Bulls.

Ways to Connect

(AP PHOTOS/JOHN BAZEMORE, TODD KIRKLAND, JOHN AMIS)

The race to succeed Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal has become costly. New financial reports show governor candidate spending is at $33 million and it’s expected to increase. Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle is up against Secretary of State Brian Kemp in the July 24 GOP runoff.

(AP PHOTO/TODD KIRKLAND, FILE)

The National Rifle Association endorsed Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle days before the July 24 GOP runoff against Secretary of State Brian Kemp.  This comes as Kemp tried to paint Cagle as weak on gun issues.


STUART ISETT / FORTUNE

July fifth 2018 marks the fourth anniversary of  "Two Way Street." To celebrate that milestone, we're revisiting one of our favorite conversations: an interview with Diana Nyad, the strong-willed swimmer who was the first to swim from Cuba to Florida without a protective shark cage. 

She completed the feat, which many thought was impossible, at the remarkable age of 66. 


GPB News

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” Tom Johnson shares stories about his life and career in journalism.

We’re revisiting this conversation — and other favorites — as part of our “Two Way Street” anniversary celebration. To kick off our fifth year, we’re listening again to the shows that we can’t let go: the conversations that challenged us, surprised us and have stuck with us all these years. This show originally aired on January 14, 2017.


(AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Donald Trump may have signed an order keeping immigrant families arrested at the border together, but it’s his comments this morning about pending immigration legislation that some say just threw GOP members of Congress under the bus. 


AP Photo

Johnny Mercer grew up in Savannah and went on to write some of the most popular love songs of the 20th century. You may not know his name, but you certainly know his music, which includes "Something’s Gotta Give," "Moon River," and "Autumn Leaves." Between 1929 and 1976, Mercer wrote the lyrics—and in some cases the music too—to some 1,400 songs.

We explore the life and music of Johnny Mercer with Georgia State University archivist Kevin Fleming. Georgia State is the repository for Johnny Mercer’s papers as well as a vast collection of other materials related to his life and career.


Today: Georgia's U.S. Senators go their separate ways over President Trump's tariffs. Johnny Isakson wants Congress to approve them while David Perdue says the President has the power to act on his own. We'll look at that split, and at Perdue's apparent unwavering loyalty to the Trump agenda. 


Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, GA

Savannah businessman Charles Lamar on Nov. 28, 1858, became the first person in 40 years to land a slave ship on American soil.

That event is the subject of Jim Jordan’s new book, “The Slave-Trader’s Letter-Book: Charles Lamer, the Wanderer, and other Tales of the African Slave Trade.”

Jordan was able to reconstruct the story because he got his hands on valuable research material — Charles Lamar’s own letters, which most historians didn’t even believe existed.   


AP Photo/Susan Walsh, Pool

We check the tempature of the response to the Trump-Kim summit. Former U.S. Senator Sam Nunn, a national leader in the effort to end nuclear proliferation, weighs in on Trump's Singapore meeting with North Korea leader Kim Jong Un. Nunn is the Co-Chair of the Nuclear Threat Initiative. Is he optomistic that change is in the air on the Korean Peninsula?


AP Photo/Steve Helber

As one of the leading figures in efforts to end nuclear proliferation, former U.S. Senator Sam Nunn shares his thoughts about the Trump summit with Political Rewind.


AP Photo/John Amis

GOP gubernatorial candidate under fire for a secret recording, in which he admits he used legislation to undermine a primary opponent. And why did former rival Clay Tippins record and leak the tape? Our panel has answers.


Tom Faust

Bill and his panel of political insiders discuss some of the major stories in political news. How are voters making decisions about the governor's race? For Republicans, is Columbus Kemp or Cagle country? And how will Stacey Abrams fare as the race heads to November? Democrats have nominated a former Navy pilot to run against 3rd district GOP incumbent Congressman Drew Ferguson, but is Ferguson in a safe Republican seat?


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Who is Atticus Finch really—an arch-segregationist or a champion of justice? And how do we go about answering that question when going straight to the source isn’t an option?


(AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Supreme Court issues a landmark ruling, siding with a baker who refused to make a gay couple’s wedding cake. It’s a narrowly argued decision, but it will have an impact here in Georgia and across the country.  Then, Democrat Stacey Abrams and Republican Casey Cagle have been polling voters to come up with strategies for how to win the governor’s mansion.  Meanwhile, Brian Kemp is promoting his own polls that show him neck-and-neck with Cagle for the GOP nomination.  Our panel looks at the latest news from the governor’s race.  Plus, could a federal court force Georgia election officials to scramble to provide paper ballots for the November elections?


(AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the always contentious issues of illegal immigration is back in the spotlight.  A bi-partisan group of U.S. House members is pushing hard to bring a number of reform bills to the floor for a vote, but Speaker Paul Ryan isn’t ready to play ball.  Also, the White House is under fire for promoting a policy of separating children from parents when families are apprehended by border police.


David Spender/Flickr

Right now Muslims around the world are observing Ramadan, the holiest period on the Islamic calendar. What is Ramadan and what is the history behind it? What compels Muslims everywhere to devote themselves to an entire month of fasting and prayer?

Soumaya Khalifa, one of Georgia's most influential Muslim leaders, joins us to answer those questions and more. Khalifa is the Executive Director of the Islamic Speakers Bureau of Atlanta. 


Roseanne And Racism

May 30, 2018
(Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP)

On this edition of Political Rewind, ABC’s firing of Roseanne Barr over her Twitter bullying of Valerie Jarrett is the hottest topic in the country today. Why can’t we erase the stain of racism that continues to plague us? Do Southerners have a unique perspective on the problem? Our panel weighs in on what may be the thorniest issue in American life. Also, Republicans have begun their effort to paint Stacey Abrams in a negative light, pushing her to release her tax returns and explain her financial problems. Meanwhile, Casey Cagle begins his TV campaign to win the GOP runoff with a sunny message from his wife. How will Brian Kemp respond?


(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

On this edition of Political Rewind, after choosing their nominee for governor, Georgia Democrats declare they are unified and energized to put Stacey Abrams in the Governor’s Mansion this fall. Meanwhile, Republicans here and in Washington are wasting no time attacking Abrams even as they face a potentially contentious gubernatorial runoff battle between Brian Kemp and Casey Cagle. Our panel weighs in on the latest news in the midterm elections. Plus, what was behind Democratic Congressman David Scott’s emotional speech in the U.S. House last week. The AJC’s Jim Galloway tells us why Scott thinks racism is behind a funding measure dropped from the Farm Bill.


JOAN MARCUS / HAMILTON BROADWAY

Today we're talking about one of the biggest sensations in the history of American theatre: "Hamilton: An American Musical." Composer, lyrisict, and preformer Lin-Manuel Miranda was inspired to create "Hamilton" after reading Ron Chernow's 800-page biography of Alexander Hamilton. 

(AP Photos/John Bazemore, Todd Kirkland, John Amis)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the race for governor of Georgia moves one step down the road.  Democratic voters advance Stacey Abrams to the general election in overwhelming fashion, while Republicans set the stage for a fight for the soul of their party, a runoff between Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp.  Runoffs will also determine which candidates will face GOP congressional incumbents some see as vulnerable in the fall.  Our panel of insiders break down the vote and look at what to expect as they 2018 election marches towards November.

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