Bill Nigut

Host & Producer

Bill Nigut has been a program host and producer at Georgia Public Broadcasting since November, 2013. He currently hosts “Two Way Street,” a show that features long-form conversations with authors, artists, chefs, scientists and other creative people who have fascinating stories to tell. He is host and producer of “Political Rewind,” a twice-weekly political roundtable show featuring some of Georgia’s best-informed insiders weighing in on the big state and national political stories.

Bill spent 20 years as the national and state political correspondent for WSB-TV in Atlanta. In that role, he covered five presidential campaigns, traveling to Iowa, New Hampshire and other key primary states in each presidential election cycle. Bill also covered the White House and Capitol Hill for WSB, commuting from his home in Atlanta when major news stories were breaking in Washington, D.C. He grew up in Chicago, where he developed his love of rough and tumble politics and the Chicago Bears and Da Bulls.

Ways to Connect

AP Photos (David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the candidates for Mayor of Atlanta slug it out in their first runoff debate.  Did we learn anything new about the matchup between Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood?   A Democratic state representative has introduced legislation to ban “bump stocks” in Georgia and one GOP candidate for governor is already attacking the measure.  How will it fare in the 2018 session?  Plus, after attacking GOP Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, Democrats now have one of their own being called out for sexual harassment.  How will the Al Franken episode resonate on Cap

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It's time for our annual “Two Way Street” Thanksgiving cooking show. We’ll hear from four of Georgia’s most accomplished chefs, with their favorite Thanksgiving recipes and best holiday memories.

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On this edition of "Political Rewind," "Hardball" host Chris Matthews joins us to discuss his new book, which offers fresh insights on the life of Robert Kennedy.  Matthews sees Kennedy as a shining example of the kind, moral leader he thinks is absent from the political scene today. Also, we’ll look at the latest developments in Alabama and in Washington in the ongoing Roy Moore controversy. Despite increasing pressure, Moore seems determined to say in the race. Plus, Hillary Clinton tells a packed house in Atlanta that Trump fever has broken and the tide is turning.

Brynn Anderson / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore fights back against allegations he once initiated a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old girl. Response to the explosive report is further splitting the GOP. Also, Tom Price is out as Health and Human Services Secretary, but an investigation into his use of luxury private jets and the leaks that led to his ouster continue to rock the department. Plus, two former mayors of Atlanta weigh in on the dynamics of the runoff mayoral contest. They contend that city hall corruption will be an issue, as will race.

(AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

On this edition of Political Rewind, a bad week for Republicans is now even worse: accusations of inappropriate behavior by Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore puts what should be a safe GOP seat in jeopardy.  Then, in an effort to end a boiling controversy, Kennesaw State University now says cheerleaders can take

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Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills has spent his career taking a close look at the Roman Catholic Church. But for all that thinking about religion, he had never read the Qur’an until recently. What he learned about Islam is the subject of his new book, “What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters,” and this episode of “Two Way Street.” 

Cliff Owen / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," Democrats finally have something to cheer about, chalking up important victories in Virginia and New Jersey while, in Georgia, Dems cut into the dominant GOP majority in the legislatures. The Atlanta mayor’s race heads into a runoff and once again city voters are confronted by a contest divided on racial lines.

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On this edition of "Political Rewind," another mass shooting rocks the country. Is easy access to guns to blame? In Georgia, new efforts are underway to move away from the past in a city that was a key part of the Civil War. We discuss. Also, a Republican legislator says it’s time to move past “repeal and replace” and look to using Obamacare to expand Medicaid in Georgia, but with a narrow purpose in mind. Plus, candidates for mayor of Atlanta gear up to get out the vote for Tuesday’s election.

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On this edition of "Political Rewind," after rolling out their long-awaited tax reform plan, House GOP leaders are already facing resistance from their own ranks, and Democrats are pushing back hard. Also, a new eyewitness report indicates that Jeff Sessions was more aware of efforts to connect the Trump campaign to Russia than he’s admitted. Now Democrats want him to explain himself.

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Daylight saving time ends this Sunday, which means we'll be getting back that hour of sleep we lost in March. Why do we turn our clocks back? We're getting to the bottom of that and more this week on "Two Way Street." On today's show, we hear from historian Michael O'Malley on the topic of time.

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On this edition of "Political Rewind," the first indictments in the Russia collusion probe remain the chief pre-occupation in Washington, even as the president and the GOP try to shift focus to tax reform and a crucial Trump trip to Asia. Our panel will look at the latest developments in the Mueller probe and weigh in on emerging details in the tax plan. White House Chief of Staff John Kelly is under fire for his comments on the causes of the Civil War and the general who led the Confederate Army.

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On this edition of "Political Rewind," in this era of Donald Trump, is the “right” losing its mind? The popular conservative commentator Charlie Sykes thinks so, and he’s written a book to make the case. We talk with Sykes about the book and about the breaking news that’s sending tremors across Washington: Paul Manafort, Trump’s former campaign chairman, has surrendered to the FBI. He and his top aide are the first two handed indictments in the Special Counsel’s Russia probe.

ALEX SANZ / AP PHOTO

On this edition of "Political Rewind," how did voter data end up being erased from state computers even as a lawsuit challenging the integrity of Georgia elections was underway? It’s a story that could haunt top candidates in next year’s statewide elections. Also, President Trump speaks out about the opioid crisis. Did he make it clear he’s ready to commit the resources necessary to make an impact? It matters in Georgia, where the crisis looms large. Plus, Obamacare rates are out for 2018, and Georgians will pay more than people in many other states.

Panelists:

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Platinum-selling songwriter Jimmy Webb stopped by our studio last month to talk about his first memoir, "The Cake And The Rain." Artists from Frank Sinatra to Barbara Streisand have recorded Webb's songs. Some of his hits include “Up, Up and Away,” “Wichita Lineman,” “MacArthur Park,” and “By The Time I Get to Phoenix.”

Congress In Chaos?

Oct 25, 2017
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," is Congress in chaos? Arizona Senator Jeff Flake says he won’t run for re-election just hours after Senator Bob Corker unloads on President Donald Trump. Where does the dissension leave the GOP’s push for tax cuts and how serious is the fracture in the Republican Party?

Alex Sanz / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," former President Jimmy Carter wants to help try and end the crisis with North Korea. Will President Trump let him do it? Carter and Trump are different in many ways, but they also have a lot in common. We discuss. 

David Goldman / AP Photo

On today’s "Political Rewind" we look at where the GOP race for governor stands in these early days of the contest. A new poll shows Lt. Governor Casey Cagle with a significant lead. But the poll reveals a surprising result in the battle for second place.

This week on "Two Way Street," we're listening back to three of our conversations with some of the bravest, most inventive women to ever step into our studio: writers Molly Brodak and Melissa Febos, and robotics engineer Ayanna Howard.

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On today's Political Rewind, the national debate over athletes and the national anthem lands on the football field at Kennesaw State University. Does newly released evidence show that political pressure shut down protesting cheerleaders? Also, a high level Stacey Abrams campaign official appears on Russian media that is part of the FBI's investigation of organizations that tried to influence last year's presidential election. We also discuss the feud between the president and the family of a fallen U.S. serviceman.

Panelists:

David Goldman / AP Photo/File

On today's "Political Rewind," we take a closer look at just what President Trump’s executive orders on health care really mean for assuring quality insurance coverage. Who are the winners and losers in the deal? How will it affect Georgians? Andy Miller of "Georgia Health News" helps illuminate the issues.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” Delta Airlines CEO Edward Bastain is bristling at a few Trump administration policies that he says will hurt the company. It’s the first time the company has expressed deep concern with the president. Our panel talks about the friction.

Then: negotiations on a new NAFTA agreement break down, Georgia farmers could pay a steep price for failure to strike a deal. How much will tariffs hurt agriculture exports, especially in the North Georgia poultry industry?

We've heard from over 200 musicians, scientists, and other creative-types in the more than three years that "Two Way Street" has been on the air. Today, we're checking in on what three of our most interesting guests are up to now: record-setting swimmer Diana Nyad, singer-songwriter Radney Foster, and Tony-winning director Kenny Leon

On this edition of Political Rewind, will Georgia legislators proceed with plans to expand gun rights in the aftermath of the Las Vegas massacre?  We’re getting our first clues now.  Plus, new signals that state GOP leaders may be dropping their longtime resistance to investing in public transit.

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On this edition of Political Rewind, the panel looks at the issues that emerged in the debates among GOP candidates for governor of Georgia, which took place in Milledgeville and Augusta over the weekend of October 7 and 8. All of them endorsed a religious liberty bill, and turned thumbs down to legalizing casino gambling. How will those positions play with voters?

Daren Wang has made a career out of his love for literature. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Decatur Book Festival was his idea, and after 12 years as its executive director, he resigned this fall. Before that, he worked on public radio shows that celebrated literary luminaries. This August, Wang stepped into a new role: author. 

Georgia's Win List

Today on “Political Rewind,” in the aftermath of the Las Vegas massacre, both Democratic candidates for governor say they support action to curb gun abuses. How will that play with conservative Georgia voters?

Then, we look at the first face-off between those candidates, Stacey Abrams and Stacey Evans, which took place at the Carter Center Monday night.

staceyabrams.com | staceyevans.com

Today on “Political Rewind,” Stacey Abrams and Stacey Evans, the two announced Democratic candidates for governor, go head-to-head in their first forum tonight. What tone will they set? What issues are likely to emerge? We talk with the moderator of the debate, former Georgia secretary of state Cathy Cox. And we ask her about her experiences as a female candidate for governor in 2006.

Then:        

Carolyn Kaster / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” Tom Price goes public about the controversy over his travel on chartered aircraft even as new reports indicate the total of his trips is over $1 million. Is he correct that President Trump is on his side as he tries to make amends?

In state news, Macon representative Allen Peake says he’ll once again introduce legislation permitting limited production of cannabis oil in Georgia. What chance does he have of success in the upcoming session? And will he run afoul of the anti-marijuana U.S. attorney general Jeff Sessions?

Emory University’s Center for Ethics is spending the next year continuing a conversation that Mary Shelley started nearly two centuries ago. Her debut novel, “Frankenstein,” will turn 200 on January 1, 2018. Emory is commemorating that milestone with an initiative it’s calling FACE: Frankenstein Anniversary Celebration and Emory.

Martin Falbisoner / CC

Today on “Political Rewind,” in the same week that yet another Republican effort to repeal and replace Obamacare goes down in defeat, Congress faces crucial deadlines for existing programs that have a big impact on health care in Georgia. Charity hospitals could lose millions of dollars in federal financial aid. Federal funds to help pay for medical expenses for children from low-income families also face elimination. Will Congress act to save these programs?

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