Bill Nigut

Host & Producer

Bill Nigut has been a program host and producer at Georgia Public Broadcasting since November, 2013. He currently hosts “Two Way Street,” a show that features long-form conversations with authors, artists, chefs, scientists and other creative people who have fascinating stories to tell. He is host and producer of “Political Rewind,” a twice-weekly political roundtable show featuring some of Georgia’s best-informed insiders weighing in on the big state and national political stories.

Bill spent 20 years as the national and state political correspondent for WSB-TV in Atlanta. In that role, he covered five presidential campaigns, traveling to Iowa, New Hampshire and other key primary states in each presidential election cycle. Bill also covered the White House and Capitol Hill for WSB, commuting from his home in Atlanta when major news stories were breaking in Washington, D.C. He grew up in Chicago, where he developed his love of rough and tumble politics and the Chicago Bears and Da Bulls.

Ways to Connect

Dissecting the Georgia Primary

Mar 2, 2016
AP Photo/David Goldman

The 2016 SEC/Super Primaries are now history. On the Republican side, businessman Donald Trump won 7 of the 11 contested elections on March 1, including southern states Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, Virginia and Tennessee. The south was once thought to be a Sen. Ted Cruz stronghold. Trump also won Massachusetts and Vermont. Brandon Phillips of the Trump campaign joins the panel to talk about Trump’s strategy in Georgia. Cruz, meanwhile, won his home state of Texas, its neighboring state Oklahoma and Alaska. Florida Senator Marco Rubio won in Minnesota.

Super Tuesday Primary in Georgia!

Mar 1, 2016
Grant Blankenship / GPB

The SEC/Super Tuesday Primary day is finally here, as is the special Primary edition of GPB’s Political Rewind. With both major party front-runners appearing poised for big nights, their closest challengers just hoping to stay in the game.

Ebola Ethics

Nov 8, 2014

Host Bill Nigut talks with Dr. Paul Wolpe, Director of the Center for Ethics at Emory University. Wolpe is a bio-ethicist who looks at ethics in the practice of medicine. The conversation focuses on ethical and moral considerations surrounding the prevention and treatment of Ebola. For example, Zmapp, a potentially life-saving Ebola drug has been in such short supply a very limited number of patients can receive the drug. Who should get it? Who should not? What are the factors that weigh into that decision?

Bill Nigut hosts guests who tell stories of strong, courageous women in real life and in the world of fiction. First up is author and historian Karen Abbott.Her new non-fiction book "Liar, Soldier, Temptress, Spy" tells the story of four women who defied their gender-based roles to fight in the Civil War, one by posing as a man to fight as a solider, the others spying against the enemy.

This week, TWS focuses on two of Georgia's most dynamic entrepreneurs. Clark Howard and Jeff Hilimire.

A Conversation With Krista Bremer, Author Of My Accidental Jihad:

Atlanta's Power Financial Couple Jeff Sprecher & Kelly Loefler have become the highest profile married couple in Atlanta. He is the Atlanta businessman who made and won an audacious bid to buy the NY Stock Exchange. She works with him in the business but is also a principal owner of the WNBA Atlanta Dream.

Bull Durham and Factory Man

Sep 6, 2014

Bull Durham: From Film To Broadway-Bound Musical:
Released in 1988, Ron Shelton wrote and directed what many film organizations call one of the greatest sports movies, Bull Durham. He could have chosen any region of the country to tell his baseball story, but Shelton set the scene in the South. The reason, Shelton says, is because of his Southern roots.

Michael Shapiro – Director of the High Museum of Art. Shapiro has formed ground-breaking partnerships with some of the world’s most revered art institutions, including the Louvre. Before the partnership with the High Museum, the Louvre had never released works from its collection to any museum. 

Segment 1&2: During her 13 years as obituaries editor of the Atlanta Constitution Kay Powell developed a wide following for her ability to uncover unexpected, moving and often funny details about the lives of the ordinary people who were the subjects of most of her obits. Kay says her job was to write personality profiles – it just happens the people she wrote about were all dead. She shares wonderful stories about her career.

 

 

 

Segment 1&2: During her 13 years as obituaries editor of the Atlanta Constitution Kay Powell developed a wide following for her ability to uncover unexpected, moving and often funny details about the lives of the ordinary people who were the subjects of most of her obits. Kay says her job was to write personality profiles – it just happens the people she wrote about were all dead. She shares wonderful stories about her career.

What Value Do You Put On The Work Of Low Wage Earners?

The fight over raising the minimum wage remains unresolved in Washington. But that debate, plus the fight over whether to allow those in this country illegally to seek jobs raises a deeper, more subtle question: what value do we put on the work of low-wage earners?

Ebola: Dispelling The Myths
With the arrival of Ebola patients Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol at Emory University Hospital, there is probably no city or state more aware of the fight to stop the spread of Ebola than here in Atlanta and Georgia.

Dr. Mark Rosenberg, President and CEO of the Task Force for Global Health joins Bill Nigut to talk about the questions surrounding the Ebola virus.
LISTEN

 

This year is the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Atlanta. The Cyclorama, the 128-year-old painting of the Civil War battle, is getting a new home.

In July, Atlanta mayor Kasim Reed and officials from the Atlanta History Center announced that the painting would move from its longtime home in Atlanta’s Grant Park to the History Center in Buckhead, where it will become the centerpiece of a multi-million dollar expansion and renovation.

 The Vision Behind Atlanta’s Center For Civil And Human Rights

Atlanta’s Center for Civil and Human Rights has been open for almost a month. The vision for the center began during the tenure of Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin.

One of the hardest working people behind the vision of the Center for Civil Rights was Doug Shipman, who started as pro-bono consultant on the project, but soon went on to work full time in the center's development
 

What’s Happening To The Honey Bees?

 

Jimmy Carter And The Evolution Of Evangelical Christianity

On July 15, 1976, Jimmy Carter strode to the podium at the Democratic national convention in Madison Square Garden in New York to accept the Democratic nomination for President of the United States.

In Atlanta's Core, The AIDS Epidemic Is Skyrocketing. Today, thanks to new medications, HIV infections and AIDS are no longer the death sentence they once were. That may be the reason AIDS has fallen out of the media spotlight. But that doesn’t mean the virus has gone away.

In Atlanta, HIV infection in some neighborhoods is skyrocketing, nearing the same level as some African nations.

The New York Stock Exchange And The Atlanta Dream: All In A Day’s Work For Jeff Sprecher And Kelly Loeffler

Kenny Leon is a Broadway and Hollywood director who makes his home in Atlanta. He won his first Tony award in June for directing a revival of "A Raisin In The Sun" starring Denzel Washington.

Now, Leon is appearing on stage in Atlanta in a production of Bernard Slade’s "Same Time Next Year" at True Colors, his theatre company in Atlanta. His co star is Phylicia Rashad, who created the iconic role of Claire Huxtable on “The Cosby Show”.

 

Bill Nigut debuts his new weekly radio program "Two Way Street with Bill Nigut" at 4 PM, Saturday, July 5 on 88.5, GPB Atlanta)

More than 40 years ago, I started my first job in broadcasting: hosting a one-hour daily radio show on WLTD-AM in Chicago, my hometown.

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