Bill Nigut

Host & Producer

Bill Nigut has been a program host and producer at Georgia Public Broadcasting since November, 2013. He currently hosts “Two Way Street,” a show that features long-form conversations with authors, artists, chefs, scientists and other creative people who have fascinating stories to tell. He is host and producer of “Political Rewind,” a twice-weekly political roundtable show featuring some of Georgia’s best-informed insiders weighing in on the big state and national political stories.

Bill spent 20 years as the national and state political correspondent for WSB-TV in Atlanta. In that role, he covered five presidential campaigns, traveling to Iowa, New Hampshire and other key primary states in each presidential election cycle. Bill also covered the White House and Capitol Hill for WSB, commuting from his home in Atlanta when major news stories were breaking in Washington, D.C. He grew up in Chicago, where he developed his love of rough and tumble politics and the Chicago Bears and Da Bulls.

Ways to Connect

David Goldman / The Associated Press

Today on "Political Rewind," Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp joins our panelists to discuss voting in Georgia and whether or not Hurricane Matthew affected registration in the counties hardest hit. Kemp's office is currently involved in a lawsuit with the ACLU of Georgia over extending the voter registration deadline after offices closed during the storm. Our panel discusses voter turnout, early voting, and polls as we enter the final few weeks of this year's elections season.

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we talk with author and historical archivist Kaye Lanning Minchew about her new book “A President in our Midst: Franklin Delano Roosevelt in Georgia.”

Jim Cole / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," Democratic candidate for United States Senate Jim Barksdale sits down to discuss the latest in national and state politics. As the challenger to incumbent Johnny Isakson, Barksdale discusses his race strategy and campaign operations.

On this edition of “Political Rewind” we present our second voter forum. We selected seven Georgians who say they will definitely vote on November 8 and invited them to join us to discuss what is driving their choices for president and other races this year.

We’re going to talk about families on this edition of “Two Way Street.” Most of us have them, and for better or worse, our families probably have had a greater influence on how we turned out than many other forces in our lives.

Jeff Roberson / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," Hurricane Matthew reminds us of the importance of government coordination and the leadership roles of our elected leaders. Even in the middle of a hurricane, politics has maintained a presence as one campaign begins to run campaign ads on the weather channel.

David Goldman / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," our panel of political insiders discuss the recent happenings in state and national politics.

Georgia Attorney General Sam Olens is in the process of interviewing for a new job as Kennesaw State University president. In the past, Olens had expressed aspirations to become governor. Our guests offer their views on how the worlds of education and politics have collided in this unusual situation.

A con artist who plows into cars for pay while shaving her “bikini area.”

The star of Louisiana-based reality TV show “Bayou Brethren” who is actually an accordion player from Wisconsin.

A crooked businessman who steals sand from one beach to replace erosion on another.

David Goldman / AP Photo/File

Today on "Political Rewind," we speak with Senator Johnny Isakson. The senator shares an update on the happenings in Washington, D.C. as well as how this election is going to affect Georgia voters. During an election season unlike any other, Isakson speaks directly to how the national topics take shape back home. 

David Goldman / AP

On “Political Rewind” we discuss the increasing opposition to the Opportunity School District proposal. A lawsuit over the language of the referendum has been brought against Governor Deal's proposal. We discuss the views of both supporters and critics and how this will affect the public education system in Georgia.

Joe Raedle / Pool via AP

On this special edition of “Political Rewind,” we break down the first presidential debate.

On this edition of “Two Way Street” we talk to the great Atlanta-based blues guitarist Tinsley Ellis. Creative Loafing just named him blues artist of the year, and some time back, Rolling Stone magazine said of his hard-driving guitar style that his “eloquence dazzles…he achieves pyrotechnics that rival the early Jeff Beck and Eric Clapton.” High praise, indeed!

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

On “Political Rewind,” we prepare for the much-anticipated presidential debate on Monday. We discuss how candidates are preparing and what they hope to achieve in the first debate. Can Hillary Clinton steer away from policy and use this time to relate to viewers? Will Donald Trump play the role of disrupter or will he present himself as presidential?

Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we look at the different ways the Trump and Clinton campaigns responded to  this past weekend's devastating events. With a bombing in New York, additional explosives discovered in New Jersey and New York and a knife attack in Minneapolis, all eyes were on the presidential hopefuls. Which candidate do Georgians feel will do a better job with our national security?

Trevor Young / GPB

On this week’s “Two-Way Street” we sit down with celebrated musicians Mike Mills and Robert McDuffie. Working in genres that rarely intersect, the two lifelong friends have both achieved great success in their musical careers.

Courtesy Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library / UGA Libraries

Our first guest on this edition of “Two Way Street” is Jim Wagner. He’s just stepped down as president of Emory University, retiring after 13 years in that position. During his tenure at Emory, Wagner presided over a dramatic expansion of the school’s work in scientific research and public health, recruited prestigious world figures like Salman Rushdie and the Dalai Lama to join the Emory faculty and oversaw the largest increase in fundraising in the school’s history.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we take on the topics of race, religion, and polling margins of error. How will these elements collectively shape the next few weeks now that we have entered the fall campaigning season?

Dario Lopez-Mills / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we talk about the central role that immigration has taken in the 2016 race thanks to Donald Trump. Is Trump confusing voters with his mixed messages about how he’ll deal with undocumented immigrants? Is the focus on immigration distracting from debate about the other issues that a majority of voters say matter to them – the economy and jobs?

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," we begin by discussing the recent travel plans of the Trump campaign. Trump heads to Mexico to meet with President Peña Nieto ahead of the GOP candidate’s long-awaited immigration speech.

kennyleon.com

For Georgians who love theater, watching the career arc of Kenny Leon has been thrilling. He’s now a Tony Award-winning director with numerous Broadway and Off-Broadway productions to his credit.

Jenny Ament / GPB

On this edition of “Political Rewind” we present our first ever voter forum. We selected seven Georgians who say they will definitely vote on November 8 and invited them to join us to discuss what is driving their choices for president and other races this year.

Carolyn Kaster / AP Photo

On this edition of “Political Rewind,” we look at the potential impact of the latest revelations about Hillary Clinton’s email and the Clinton Foundation favors to big donors, who were granted access to meetings at the State Department when Clinton was secretary of state. This time, Donald Trump is staying on-message and hammering Clinton rather than calling negative attention to his own statements and actions.

During my tenure as editor in chief of Chicagoland Monthly, a regional magazine I ran in the late 1970s, we decided to do a cover story on how the Arab oil embargo was affecting the daily lives of people in metropolitan Chicago. Of all the covers we created for the magazine, I’m proudest of the one that hangs in my office at GPB. There’s Uncle Sam, dying for gasoline and committing suicide by self-immolation.

Carolyn Kaster / AP

Today on “Political Rewind,” Donald Trump says he regrets some of the remarks he’s made that he says may have been hurtful to others. Is this the beginning of a campaign reset that could put Trump back on track to win the White House?

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” the Trump campaign has undergone another reorganization. Stephen Bannon of Breitbart News will become the chief executive of the campaign while Kellyanne Conway, a senior adviser and pollster for the campaign, will become the campaign manager. Reports indicate Trump was chafing at efforts by Paul Manafort, his campaign chairman, to get him to soften his rhetoric and reach out beyond his base. The new team wants to let Trump be Trump, according to news reports. Can he win with this approach?

On this week’s show we tell the fascinating story of how bluegrass music – born in the hills and hollers of the North Georgia mountains and Tennessee, and in rural communities in South Carolina and West Virginia more than 200 years ago – has crossed the Pacific Ocean and been enthusiastically embraced by a large fan base in Japan. Our guest is Denis Gainty, an associate professor of history at Georgia State University. He’s now researching and writing a book about Japanese bluegrass.

Mary Altaffer / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," we begin by discussing the Clinton campaign in Georgia. While some believe that the commitment will be minimal, others, such as Mayor Kasim Reed, think Georgia’s anticipated battleground state status makes it deserving of more money. What are the expectations of the state Democratic Party?

Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we begin with a focus on Georgia. Some high-profile Georgia Democrats have begun to regret their decision to not run against Johnny Isakson as the party has struggled to reach consensus on political newcomer Jim Barksdale since he entered the race in mid-March.

BreeAnne Clowdus

Musical theater geeks, here’s your heads-up:

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we’re showcasing one of the seminal Broadway musicals – Stephen Sondheim’s “Company.” The show debuted in April of 1970, and has been revived countless times on Broadway, in London, in Australia and by regional theaters ever since. Now Atlanta’s Actor’s Express Theater is mounting a new production of the show.

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