Bill Nigut

Host & Producer

Bill Nigut has been a program host and producer at Georgia Public Broadcasting since November, 2013. He currently hosts “Two Way Street,” a show that features long-form conversations with authors, artists, chefs, scientists and other creative people who have fascinating stories to tell. He is host and producer of “Political Rewind,” a twice-weekly political roundtable show featuring some of Georgia’s best-informed insiders weighing in on the big state and national political stories.

Bill spent 20 years as the national and state political correspondent for WSB-TV in Atlanta. In that role, he covered five presidential campaigns, traveling to Iowa, New Hampshire and other key primary states in each presidential election cycle. Bill also covered the White House and Capitol Hill for WSB, commuting from his home in Atlanta when major news stories were breaking in Washington, D.C. He grew up in Chicago, where he developed his love of rough and tumble politics and the Chicago Bears and Da Bulls.

Ways to Connect

Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we begin with a focus on Georgia. Some high-profile Georgia Democrats have begun to regret their decision to not run against Johnny Isakson as the party has struggled to reach consensus on political newcomer Jim Barksdale since he entered the race in mid-March.

BreeAnne Clowdus

Musical theater geeks, here’s your heads-up:

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we’re showcasing one of the seminal Broadway musicals – Stephen Sondheim’s “Company.” The show debuted in April of 1970, and has been revived countless times on Broadway, in London, in Australia and by regional theaters ever since. Now Atlanta’s Actor’s Express Theater is mounting a new production of the show.

Andrew Harnik / AP

Today on “Political Rewind,” we take a look at what the polls are telling us about the state of the race - in Georgia, nationally, and in crucial battleground states. Has Georgia become a toss-up state in the presidential election? New polls suggest the race here is virtually tied.

Evan Vucci / AP

Today on “Political Rewind,” we discuss the many issues surrounding Donald Trump’s campaign. From his ongoing feud with Kazr Kahn and his family, to his continued alienation of the GOP establishment, to his desire for a warm relationship with Vladimir Putin, there is much for his campaign staff to mull over.

PublicAffairs/Knopf

This week we feature conversations with two authors whose books are on a new list of “10 Books Every Georgian Should Read.” The list is compiled annually by the Georgia Center for the Book, a Decatur-based organization affiliated with the Library of Congress.

Carolyn Kaster / AP

Today on “Political Rewind," we analyze the opposing visions that have been laid out for America’s future. Now that the general election campaign has officially started, who will voters choose?

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Today on “Political Rewind,” we discuss the events of last night in Philadelphia. On a poignant note, Bernie Sanders elected to do what Hillary Clinton did for President Obama in 2008, asking for a vote by acclamation.

Carolyn Kaster / AP

Today on "Political Rewind," we take a look at the major speeches from the first night of the Democratic Convention. Though Bernie Sanders provided a powerful endorsement of Hillary Clinton, some of his strongest supporters remained resistant.

chistopherdickey.com/Deckle Edge

This week we revisit my conversation with journalist Christopher Dickey, author of “Our Man in Charleston: Britain’s Secret Agent in the Civil War South.”

Patrick Semansky / AP

Today on “Political Rewind,” we discuss the aftermath of Donald Trump’s official acceptance speech, the end to a tumultuous week in Cleveland.

Today is day three of the Republican National Convention. The delegates made it official last night: Donald Trump is the GOP’s presidential nominee. Even though some Republicans remain divided about Trump, the one thing that binds them is their hostility toward Hillary Clinton, but will that be enough to elect their candidate?

Carolyn Kaster / AP Photo

On today’s special Republican National Convention edition, we look at the growing controversy over Melania Trump’s speech. It seems clear that passages from the address were lifted from a speech that Michelle Obama gave at the 2008 Democratic convention. Should this matter to voters? What does it say about the organizational strength of the Trump campaign? Will it overshadow the messages that the GOP wants to get out this week?

Bronwen Dickey has become one of the more controversial authors of the moment thanks to her book “Pit Bull: The Battle over an American Icon.” In it, she argues that research shows that as a breed pit bulls are no more dangerous or vicious than any other dog.

Michael Conroy, David Zalubowski / AP Photo

On Friday Donald Trump announced Indiana Governor Mike Pence as his vice presidential running mate. The statement was made via Twitter, as he postponed today’s previously scheduled news conference to Saturday, in response to the devastating attack in Nice, France.

Eric Gay / AP

We begin by discussing the impassioned calls for unity that came from Tuesday's Dallas memorial service. Will the remarks given by President Obama and former President Bush greatly affect the rhetoric of the current presidential campaigns? Have Trump or Clinton shown the same kind of leadership in their responses to the Dallas shootings?

Stacey Bode

We have an eclectic mix on this edition of "Two Way Street." Because it’s summertime (and the livin’ is easy), it seemed like a good time to start the show with something light and fun; and so, we do.

LM Otero / AP Photo

Today we discuss the recent murder of five police officers in Dallas, Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, and Philando Castile in Falcon Heights. As the two major parties prepare for their national conventions, how will they address the violence splitting the black community and law enforcement in two?

File / AP Photo

How are Georgia political leaders are reacting to FBI Director James Comey’s searing condemnation of Hillary Clinton’s judgment? Though Comey stated that she broke no national security laws, he also cited her handling of highly classified information as “careless.” Georgia Democratic Party Chair Dubose Porter and GOP Chair John Padgett join us to discuss the potential ramifications of Comey’s comments.

Emrah Gurel / AP Photo

In the aftermath of the attack on Ataturk international airport in Istanbul, Donald Trump sounded a harsh call for fighting terrorism, suggesting the response should be to “fight fire with fire.” Hillary Clinton’s response was more measured, focusing on solidarity between America and Turkey. Which approach will voters embrace?

Sid Mashburn On Men's Fashion And Southern Style

Jun 25, 2016
Jenny Ament / GPB

Just the other weekend, my family was out to dinner celebrating Father’s Day. While typically my family’s gatherings are a time to catch up on everyone’s lives, this dinner conversation was different as it was surprisingly centered around men’s clothing.

Matt Dunham / AP Photo

The panel looks at the surprising outcome of the Brexit vote. British citizens voted by a wide margin to withdraw from the EU. 

Tim Hetherington

Our guest on this edition of ”Two Way Street” is New York Times best-selling author Sebastian Junger. Junger wrote the international blockbuster “The Perfect Storm,” the harrowing true tale of the doomed efforts of a boat of commercial fisherman struggling to survive a raging North Atlantic storm. Later, the book became a hit movie starring George Clooney and Mark Wahlberg.

Rebecca Wheeler / GPB

On this edition of “Political Rewind” we talk to Georgians who attended the Trump rally at the Fox Theatre in Atlanta to learn why they believe Trump is better suited to be president than Hillary Clinton.

Trump Visits Atlanta

Jun 15, 2016
Rebecca Wheeler / GPB

Our panel of insiders and GPB’s team of reporters cover all the news of Donald Trump’s visit to Atlanta. He’s in town just hours before “Political Rewind” airs for a private fundraising breakfast and a public rally at the Fox Theatre at noon.

Romanov Collection, General Collection, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library / Yale University

Back in the days when local TV stations ran old movies late at night, I watched for the first time “Rasputin and the Empress,” the 1932 picture that was a showcase for the acting talents of the remarkable Barrymore family. It was based on the true story of the hypnotic hold the mystic Grigory Rasputin had on Czar Nicholas and Czarina Alexandra in the years leading up to the Russian Revolution.

Julie Jacobson / AP Photo

The presidential race is now fully under way with Hillary Clinton the presumptive nominee of the Democratic Party squaring off against Donald Trump. The panel of insiders will talk about the dynamics of the race here in Georgia. Hillary Clinton has raised a lot of money here but do Democrats believe Hillary actually has a chance to win Georgia?

Adapted from MartialArtsNomad.com

On this edition, we present a “Political Rewind” exclusive: a debate between Columbus state senator Josh McKoon, the hardest driving proponent of religious liberty measures in the state legislature and former spokesman for Governor Deal Brian Robinson.

Linda Chen / GPB

As a teenager growing up in the Midwest, I watched the Southern civil rights movement unfold from a distance. I was in high school in a suburb just outside of Chicago when the Selma to Montgomery march took place and a college student when Dr. King was murdered. Like many Americans, I grew to have enormous admiration for the men and women who were courageously confronting racism and bigotry through non-violence.

Augusta Convention Center

Georgia Republicans are holding their state convention in Augusta this weekend, but Governor Deal and House Speaker David Ralston aren’t going to be there. Our panel of insiders look at why two of the state’s top GOP leaders will be no-shows.

Richard Drew / AP Photo

Georgia U.S. Senator David Perdue’s recent op-ed in the Washington Post, which comes close to an out-and-out endorsement of Donald Trump, says that Trump, like Perdue himself, is an example of how voters are embracing candidates who aren’t part of the Washington establishment. Perdue writes “let Trump be Trump,” and if he is, he will be elected president.

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