Bill Nigut

Host & Producer

Bill Nigut has been a program host and producer at Georgia Public Broadcasting since November, 2013. He currently hosts “Two Way Street,” a show that features long-form conversations with authors, artists, chefs, scientists and other creative people who have fascinating stories to tell. He is host and producer of “Political Rewind,” a twice-weekly political roundtable show featuring some of Georgia’s best-informed insiders weighing in on the big state and national political stories.

Bill spent 20 years as the national and state political correspondent for WSB-TV in Atlanta. In that role, he covered five presidential campaigns, traveling to Iowa, New Hampshire and other key primary states in each presidential election cycle. Bill also covered the White House and Capitol Hill for WSB, commuting from his home in Atlanta when major news stories were breaking in Washington, D.C. He grew up in Chicago, where he developed his love of rough and tumble politics and the Chicago Bears and Da Bulls.

Ways to Connect

Richard Drew / AP Photo

Georgia U.S. Senator David Perdue’s recent op-ed in the Washington Post, which comes close to an out-and-out endorsement of Donald Trump, says that Trump, like Perdue himself, is an example of how voters are embracing candidates who aren’t part of the Washington establishment. Perdue writes “let Trump be Trump,” and if he is, he will be elected president.

Stuart Isett / Fortune

On this Memorial Day weekend, as millions of people look forward to summer vacations at the ocean, it seemed like just the right time to revisit one of our favorite “Two Way Street” conversations – our talk with the heroic ocean swimmer Diana Nyad.

Public Domain / White House Photo Office

As you certainly know, this has been an extraordinary election year; and our team of political insiders has been working hard to bring you the best perspectives on what’s happening. And so, we decided that we should give them a chance to relax on this long Memorial Day weekend. But they will be back for our live show next week.

In place of our usual panel conversation we’re sharing with you a conversation I had last month at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library with Randall Woods, Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Arkansas.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

We look at the results of yesterday’s primary elections in Georgia. The outsider fever that has taken hold in much of the country this year wasn’t apparent in key races here.

Workman Publishing

If I could say only one thing about my conversation with author Lee Smith for this edition of “Two Way Street” it would be this:

Listen to her voice.

shrtstck | icnt.mx

With Georgia primary elections coming up on Tuesday, May 24, our panel of insiders looks at how key races are taking shape in the final days of the campaign.

Mel Evans / AP Photo

Georgia Republicans say they’re spoiling for a fight over the Obama administration ruling that schools must give transgender students access to the bathroom of the gender with which they identify or risk losing federal funds. Is this a fight worth having?

Afropunk

Some artists live in a city, others are of the city.

Phillip Depoy and Beverly “Guitar” Watkins, our two guests on this edition of "Two Way Street," are in the latter category. Yes, they both make their homes in Atlanta – Watkins in the Old Fourth Ward, Depoy in Decatur – but Atlanta and Georgia also are deeply influential in the art they produce.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

AJC political writer Jim Galloway unveils the results of the newspaper’s brand new poll. The panel discusses the poll findings on Governor Deal’s approval rating, how Georgians feel about his vetoes of campus carry and religious liberty, and who stacks up as a better general election candidates against Donald Trump: Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders.

(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

A new poll from WSB-TV shows Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton in a statistical tie in Georgia. But it's still the early days in the the general election campaign. Neither candidate has officially won their party's nomination, and 16 percent of voters in that poll are undecided. 

Public Domain/Wiki Commons

With the Georgia primary elections just a little more than two weeks away, our panel of insiders look at the heated GOP congressional races where incumbents Doug Collins and Barry Loudermilk are facing challenges in part because of the very first vote each of them took when they arrived at the U.S. House: helping elect John Boehner speaker. Plus they look at the contest to replace 3rd District congressman Lynn Westmoreland, who is retiring at the end of the year.

faithsalie.com

Make no mistake: Faith Salie’s book, “Approval Junkie: Adventures in Caring Too Much,” is a thoughtful account of the price Salie paid for her obsessive need to win applause and approbation. She examines her thirst for approval unflinchingly. In doing so, she gives us, the readers, the opportunity to examine the lengths we may go to win approval.

But here’s the thing: the book is also very funny; and so, when she came to the studio to record our show, I thought: don’t fight it – just allow the show to be funny.

Reagan Presidential Library

Think this year’s presidential race is unlike anything that’s happened in the past? Not so fast! We welcome back Emory University history professor Joe Crespino, who discusses the striking parallels between the current campaigns and past races in American history.

Mary Altaffer / AP

Tuesday was Governor Deal’s final day to act on legislation. The headline, of course, was his decision to veto the controversial “campus carry” bill. What factors led to his veto? What will pro-gun forces do next? How will the governor’s action affect his ability to work with legislators next session?

Public Domain / White House Photo Office

It was more than 48 years ago, but I remember vividly the night of March 31, 1968, when Lyndon Johnson surprised the world by announcing he would not run for a second full term as president. The stunning news came at the end of a speech from the Oval Office in which Johnson announced he was halting the bombing raids over North Vietnam – and it took my breath away. My anti-war friends and I had been demonstrating against the Vietnam War and against LBJ for many months (“Hey, hey, LBJ, how many kids did you kill today!”).

Trevor Young / GPB

Today the panel looks at a number of important state news stories.

Governor Deal has just three days left to announce whether he will sign or veto the controversial “campus carry” bill. The panel tries to read the tea leaves to determine what Deal is thinking as he approaches the deadline.

Please join us Thursday, May 5, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. at the Carter Presidential Library & Museum Theater. I'll be sitting down with research scholar Meg Jacobs from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. We'll discuss her compelling new book, "Panic at the Pump: The Energy Crisis and the Transformation of American Politics in the 1970s."

Matt Rourke / AP Photo

On today’s show, we look at the massive victories that Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump scored in the five primary elections that were held yesterday.

Gerald Herbert / AP

Republican political consultant Todd Rehm is just back from the Republican National Committee’s Spring Meeting in Florida. He shared with us just what went on: Ted Cruz and John Kasich were there courting delegates; Donald Trump’s new campaign chief Paul Manifort was there, too, telling everyone who would listen that a new more thoughtful and less controversial Trump is about to emerge; efforts to change the convention rules to allow the emergence of a new last minute candidate were debated and more.

Joan Marcus / Hamilton Broadway

After opening his first Broadway show “In the Heights” to great acclaim, composer, lyricist and performer Lin-Manuel Miranda took a vacation to Mexico. At the airport, he picked up a book to read while he was gone. It wasn’t exactly a beach read. Miranda bought Ron Chernow’s 800-page biography of Alexander Hamilton; and as he read it, it occurred to him that Hamilton’s life would make a great musical. 

Kathy Willens / AP

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton both scored major victories in the state they call home – New York. Are they each now securely on the road to winning the nominations of their parties? 

Task Force for Global Health

I think that global public health workers are some of the most inspiring and dedicated professionals I’ve ever encountered. That’s probably why I’ve invited a number of them to sit down over the past couple of years for interviews for “Two Way Street.”

On this edition of Political Rewind our panel of insiders tackles a number of current issues in the news:

Charles Rex Arbogast / AP Photo

On today’s show we talk with special guest Randy Evans. At a time when Donald Trump is claiming the Republican leadership is stacking the deck against him, when talk of a contested convention or a brokered convention is growing, Evans is the go-to expert on how the rules will work in the process of selecting a nominee.

Brady-Handy Photograph Collection / Library of Congress

If you go to Amazon and search for books about Abraham Lincoln, you’ll get 101 pages of results; and that’s only the books that the online retailer has in its own inventory. There are no doubt hundreds of books that are out there that Amazon doesn’t stock for one reason or another. Lincoln is certainly one of the most written about figures in world history, and some of us just can’t get enough of reading about him. It doesn’t matter that a new biography may cover much of the same ground that the last six I’ve read do. Lincoln’s story is continually inspiring, and I find that at whatever age I read a new Lincoln biography, I come away with lessons that speak to me about who I am at that particular time in my life.

James Patterson / AP Images for Human Rights Campaign

On today’s show, our panel of insiders will look at the storm of controversy that has erupted around new religious liberty laws in Mississippi and North Carolina. Both states passed the measures just days after Georgia governor Nathan Deal vetoed a religious liberty bill here.

Please join us this Tuesday, April 12 at the Carter Presidential Library & Museum Theater. I'll be sitting down with prize-winning historian Randall B. Woods to discuss “Prisoners of Hope,” the first comprehensive history of Lyndon Johnson's Great Society, exploring both the breathtaking possibilities of visionary politics, as well as its limits.

Paul Sancya / AP

Wisconsin voters weren’t good to front-runners in the race for the White House.

Public Domain

Think that this year’s presidential contest is the wildest this country’s ever seen? Well, think again.

David Goldman / AP

Lt. Governor Casey Cagle and House Speaker David Ralston say there will be no special session to override Governor Nathan Deal’s veto of a religious liberty bill. Both leaders would like to take another pass on the bill in the next legislative session.

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