Bill Nigut

Host & Producer

Bill Nigut has been a program host and producer at Georgia Public Broadcasting since November, 2013. He currently hosts “Two Way Street,” a show that features long-form conversations with authors, artists, chefs, scientists and other creative people who have fascinating stories to tell. He is host and producer of “Political Rewind,” a twice-weekly political roundtable show featuring some of Georgia’s best-informed insiders weighing in on the big state and national political stories.

Bill spent 20 years as the national and state political correspondent for WSB-TV in Atlanta. In that role, he covered five presidential campaigns, traveling to Iowa, New Hampshire and other key primary states in each presidential election cycle. Bill also covered the White House and Capitol Hill for WSB, commuting from his home in Atlanta when major news stories were breaking in Washington, D.C. He grew up in Chicago, where he developed his love of rough and tumble politics and the Chicago Bears and Da Bulls.

Ways to Connect

Joan Marcus / Hamilton Broadway

After opening his first Broadway show “In the Heights” to great acclaim, composer, lyricist and performer Lin-Manuel Miranda took a vacation to Mexico. At the airport, he picked up a book to read while he was gone. It wasn’t exactly a beach read. Miranda bought Ron Chernow’s 800-page biography of Alexander Hamilton; and as he read it, it occurred to him that Hamilton’s life would make a great musical. 

Kathy Willens / AP

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton both scored major victories in the state they call home – New York. Are they each now securely on the road to winning the nominations of their parties? 

Task Force for Global Health

I think that global public health workers are some of the most inspiring and dedicated professionals I’ve ever encountered. That’s probably why I’ve invited a number of them to sit down over the past couple of years for interviews for “Two Way Street.”

On this edition of Political Rewind our panel of insiders tackles a number of current issues in the news:

Charles Rex Arbogast / AP Photo

On today’s show we talk with special guest Randy Evans. At a time when Donald Trump is claiming the Republican leadership is stacking the deck against him, when talk of a contested convention or a brokered convention is growing, Evans is the go-to expert on how the rules will work in the process of selecting a nominee.

Brady-Handy Photograph Collection / Library of Congress

If you go to Amazon and search for books about Abraham Lincoln, you’ll get 101 pages of results; and that’s only the books that the online retailer has in its own inventory. There are no doubt hundreds of books that are out there that Amazon doesn’t stock for one reason or another. Lincoln is certainly one of the most written about figures in world history, and some of us just can’t get enough of reading about him. It doesn’t matter that a new biography may cover much of the same ground that the last six I’ve read do. Lincoln’s story is continually inspiring, and I find that at whatever age I read a new Lincoln biography, I come away with lessons that speak to me about who I am at that particular time in my life.

James Patterson / AP Images for Human Rights Campaign

On today’s show, our panel of insiders will look at the storm of controversy that has erupted around new religious liberty laws in Mississippi and North Carolina. Both states passed the measures just days after Georgia governor Nathan Deal vetoed a religious liberty bill here.

Please join us this Tuesday, April 12 at the Carter Presidential Library & Museum Theater. I'll be sitting down with prize-winning historian Randall B. Woods to discuss “Prisoners of Hope,” the first comprehensive history of Lyndon Johnson's Great Society, exploring both the breathtaking possibilities of visionary politics, as well as its limits.

Paul Sancya / AP

Wisconsin voters weren’t good to front-runners in the race for the White House.

Public Domain

Think that this year’s presidential contest is the wildest this country’s ever seen? Well, think again.

David Goldman / AP

Lt. Governor Casey Cagle and House Speaker David Ralston say there will be no special session to override Governor Nathan Deal’s veto of a religious liberty bill. Both leaders would like to take another pass on the bill in the next legislative session.

Diwang Valdez

Not long ago, “Two Way Street” producer Jenny Ament told me she thought we ought to do an interview with Dr. Dax. Dax, for all of you out there who are as clueless as I was, is one of the best-known Atlanta graffiti writers to make a splash on the national scene.

Trevor Young / GPB

There’s been a tremendous backlash in the conservative faith community after Governor Deal announced he will veto the “religious liberty” bill. Our panel of insiders discusses how the governor came to his decision and what supporters of the bill plan to do next to give the measure new life.

Sine Die Another Day

Mar 25, 2016
Branden Camp / AP

On this Sine Die edition of “Political Rewind,” our panel of insiders takes a look at what happened during the final frantic hours of the legislative session.

David Goldman / AP

Our panel looks at the issues still in play as the 2016 session of the Georgia general assembly gets set to adjourn on Thursday night, March 24. Among them are campus carry, expediting rape kit processing, and expanding the number of medical conditions that qualify for treatment with medical marijuana.

Brownell / AP Photo

Before we invited Broadway singer and actress Terry Burrell to be a guest on Two Way Street, I knew very little about the great star Ethel Waters. But I did a lot of research about her to prepare for my conversation with Terry, who wrote and is starring in a one-woman show about Ethel Waters at Atlanta’s Alliance Theatre.

David Goldman / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Starting out under the Gold Dome, both the House and Senate have passed HB 757, “an Act to protect religious freedoms.” 

Breaking Down The March 15 Primaries

Mar 16, 2016
Tony Dejak / AP

In news from Washington, President Obama picked the top judge from the DC Circuit to be the next Supreme Court justice. Merrick Garland is a former federal prosecutor who had been previously been recommended to the president by a leading Republican for openings on the Court. 

Paul Morigi / Invision for United Nations Foundation/AP Images

We’ve heard a lot about the Evangelical vote during this presidential primary season. And when it’s referred to, it almost always means white, conservative Christians. But Evangelicals weren’t always defined that way. In fact, during the 1976 presidential race, it was progressive Evangelicals who helped elect Jimmy Carter to the White House.

David Goldman / AP

Starting out under the Gold Dome where the Senate passed HB 859, the “campus carry” bill. The legislation, if signed by the governor, will allow students, faculty and staff over age 21 with a Georgia Weapon Carry License to carry concealed firearms on Georgia’s college campuses. Opponents of the law say that it will make students, faculty and staff less safe on campuses around the state. Proponents of the legislation say that it allows licensed carriers the opportunity to protect themselves. Who’s right?

Lynne Sladky / AP

Another round of Tuesday primary voting has come and gone, and with it another round of opportunities for those trailing Republican front-runner Donald Trump to make a dent in his ever growing delegate lead.

Kevork Djansezian / AP Photo

I’ve never tried playing the game of imagining the guests I’d most like to invite to a dinner party at my house. But I do know that one of the seats would be saved for Cokie Roberts. I’ve interviewed her a number of times over the years, and in each case she displays great skills as a completely engaging conversationalist. She’s warm and funny, always enthusiastic about the topic at hand, and oh so smart. Cokie always makes me feel that she’s glad I asked each question I’ve thrown her way, and I’m sure she does the same for the others who talk to her, too.

Breaking Down the GOP Debate

Mar 4, 2016
Paul Sancya / AP

Well, the eleventh Republican presidential debate is in the books and what did we learn? Probably that a smaller, seemingly more manageable field of candidates does not necessarily lead to grand discussions of ideas and a spirited debate on policy differences. This debate might well be most remembered as the debate in which the front runner for a major party’s nomination for the most powerful elected office in the world declared that there was no problem with his “manhood.”

AP Photo/David Goldman

Super Tuesday is over, but it's only one chapter in the long saga of the 2016 election.

Dissecting the Georgia Primary

Mar 2, 2016
AP Photo/David Goldman

The 2016 SEC/Super Primaries are now history. On the Republican side, businessman Donald Trump won 7 of the 11 contested elections on March 1, including southern states Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, Virginia and Tennessee. The south was once thought to be a Sen. Ted Cruz stronghold. Trump also won Massachusetts and Vermont. Brandon Phillips of the Trump campaign joins the panel to talk about Trump’s strategy in Georgia. Cruz, meanwhile, won his home state of Texas, its neighboring state Oklahoma and Alaska. Florida Senator Marco Rubio won in Minnesota.

Super Tuesday Primary in Georgia!

Mar 1, 2016
Grant Blankenship / GPB

The SEC/Super Tuesday Primary day is finally here, as is the special Primary edition of GPB’s Political Rewind. With both major party front-runners appearing poised for big nights, their closest challengers just hoping to stay in the game.

Ebola Ethics

Nov 8, 2014

Host Bill Nigut talks with Dr. Paul Wolpe, Director of the Center for Ethics at Emory University. Wolpe is a bio-ethicist who looks at ethics in the practice of medicine. The conversation focuses on ethical and moral considerations surrounding the prevention and treatment of Ebola. For example, Zmapp, a potentially life-saving Ebola drug has been in such short supply a very limited number of patients can receive the drug. Who should get it? Who should not? What are the factors that weigh into that decision?

Bill Nigut hosts guests who tell stories of strong, courageous women in real life and in the world of fiction. First up is author and historian Karen Abbott.Her new non-fiction book "Liar, Soldier, Temptress, Spy" tells the story of four women who defied their gender-based roles to fight in the Civil War, one by posing as a man to fight as a solider, the others spying against the enemy.

This week, TWS focuses on two of Georgia's most dynamic entrepreneurs. Clark Howard and Jeff Hilimire.

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