Celeste Headlee

Host & Exceutive Producer - On Second Thought

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist who hosts GPB Radio’s “On Second Thought,” weekdays from 9 – 10 a.m. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

Charlottesville, Killer Mike, Colin Mochrie

"On Second Thought" is celebrating its third anniversary this week. The show launched its first broadcast on GPB on October 20, 2014. To celebrate three amazing years, we’re re-airing our best segments in a two part broadcast. Here are the best picks for today:

Charlottesville, Killer Mike, Colin Mochrie

This week "On Second Thought" celebrates three years on the air. The show launched October 20, 2014. To celebrate, we’re re-airing a few of our best segments. Do you have a favorite segment or episode? Let us know.

Actor George Takei first came to fame as a young Sulu in the original Star Trek series. But he’s since become an active voice in promoting equal rights for LGBT people. We spoke to Takei earlier this year when the play “Allegiance,” was showing in Atlanta movie theaters. The play is inspired by Takei’s experiences in a U.S. internment camp during World War II.

David Goldman / AP Photo

In Georgia, sports are a way of life. The fandom surrounding sports often influences the psyche of both the individual and the groups obsessing over teams. Erin Tarver explores how sports can influence our values in her new book, “The ‘I’ in Team: Sports Fandom and the Reproduction of Identity.” She talks to us, along with Vicki Michaelis, Professor of Sports Journalism at the University of Georgia.

“Dear Martin,” a new novel by Atlanta author Nic Stone explores police violence against people of color, through the eyes of a teenage boy. 

"I really wrote it for my sons, they’re one and five…  And eventually, in 10 years, there are still going to be people who look at my sons and see a threat, instead of a kid. And I want them to be able to navigate this world that we live in,” says Stone. 

Charlottesville, Killer Mike, Colin Mochrie

Earlier this month the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments that could change how Georgia lawmakers draw districts for Congress and state legislative seats. The case hinges on allegations of gerrymandering in two Georgia districts. Plaintiffs claim these districts were redrawn to discriminate against black voters, and create an advantage for Republicans. We break down what gerrymandering really is, and the incredible impact it has on the nation.

We continue our coverage of gerrymandering in Georgia with Kennesaw State’s Kerwin Swint, a political science professor.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

We spend the full hour exploring how journalism is changing in the age of President Trump. Host Celeste Headlee recently led a panel discussion on how journalism has changed in the time of the Trump administration, presented by the Columbia Journalism Review. 

Reuters

This year's Nobel Prize winners were announced the first week of October. In September, slightly less prestigious awards honored the funny side of scientific discovery. The Ig Nobel Prizes have been awarded annually since 1991 to honor achievements that “first make people laugh, and then make them think.”

Charlottesville, Killer Mike, Colin Mochrie

The winners of this year’s Nobel Prizes were announced last week. Last month, slightly less prestigious awards honored the funny side of scientific discovery. The Ig Nobel Prizes have been awarded annually since 1991 to honor achievements that “first make people laugh, and then make them think.” We talk about silly science with Marc Abraham, an organizer and founder of the Ig Nobel Prizes. Also with us is Georgia Tech doctoral student Patricia Yang, who won an Ig Nobel Prize in 2015.

Adult Swim

"Squidbillies" is the third longest running animated show on Atlanta-based Adult Swim. The series is based on the show creators’ experiences here in Georgia – with a cast of anthropomorphic redneck squids. The eleventh season of "Squidbillies" premieres this Sunday, Oct. 15, on Adult Swim. We talk with the show co-creators, Dave Willis and Jim Fortier.

Susan Walsh / The Associated Press

Last month, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to restrict law enforcement seizing cash and property from people who may not be charged with a crime. According to the FBI and the Institute for Justice, police seized more property than burglars stole in 2014. It’s called civil forfeiture. We asked attorney Robert Johnson of Institute for Justice to help us better understand what it means.

He might be Georgia’s second best known politician. And perhaps its most polarizing. Bestselling author Craig Shirley sits down with us to talk about his latest book, “Citizen Newt.” It follows the career of Newt Gingrich. Emory professor of History, Joe Crespino also joins us to help breakdown key moments of Gingrich's political life.

Animal Legal Defence Fund

Two major puppy mill were busted in Georgia this year. One in April rescued more than 350 animals. Last month in Fulton County, authorities found 60 dogs, 53 lizards, a rabbit and a piranha at another site. We talk with Jessica Rock, Founding Partner at Animal Law Source.

Charlottesville, Killer Mike, Colin Mochrie

Two major puppy mill were busted in Georgia this year. One in April rescued more than 350 animals. Last month in Fulton County, authorities found 60 dogs, 53 lizards, a rabbit and a piranha at another site. We talk with Jessica Rock, Founding Partner at Animal Law Source.

The Breakroom returns! We discuss robot chefs, Amazon’s new HQ, and Nintendo brining back some 16 bit magic. We also examine Trump's handling of Puerto Rico, middle fingers, and gun laws, or lack thereof… Joining us this week are Kathy Lohr, Hector Fernandez, Christian Zsilavetz, and Greg Williams.

Charlottesville, Killer Mike, Colin Mochrie

On Monday, the Atlanta City Council voted unanimously to weaken punishments for the possession of marijuana. Now, those caught with an ounce or less will not serve jail time, and will be fined no more than $75. We talk about this monumental move with Andrea Young, Executive Director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia. 

Charlottesville, Killer Mike, Colin Mochrie

Georgia’s campus carry law allows firearms on all public college campuses, minus a few excepted spaces. We hear about the research into the effectiveness of such laws with Matthew Boedy, a Professor of English at the University of North Georgia. Also Mark Rosenberg, former President and CEO of the Task Force for Global Health.

David Goldman / AP Photo

The top American universities admit more students from the top one percent of earners than the bottom 60 percent combined. Those numbers contradict the U.S. News rankings, which seem to reward schools contributing to the rich-poor gap. Georgia State University is a national model for graduating low-income students, even though it dropped 30 spots in the U.S. News rankings. We talk with Tim Renick, Vice President for Student Success Programs at GSU.

Carolyn Kaster / The Associated Press

On Tuesday, the former head of Atlanta-based Equifax apologized many times during a hearing before a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee about the company’s massive data breach. The hack exposed more than 145 million people to possible ID theft. We checked in with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Tamar Hallerman, who has been following the Equifax scandal from Washington.

 

Pixabay / Ben Reiss and Chris Ehlen

This week a group of scientists were awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for their discoveries related to our circadian rhythms. Emory University professor Ben Reiss joined us in May to talk about his latest exploration of sleep patterns, “Wild Nights: How Taming Sleep Created Our Restless World.” We revisit that conversation, then we’re joined in the studio by Assistant Professor of Neuroscience for Morehouse School of Medicine, Chris Ehlen.

Charlottesville, Killer Mike, Colin Mochrie

On Tuesday, the former head of Atlanta-based Equifax apologized many times during a hearing before a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee  about the company’s massive data breach. The hack exposed more than 145 million people to possible ID theft. We check in with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Tamar Hallerman, who’s been following the Equifax scandal from Washington.

John Locher / The Associated Press

The death toll in Las Vegas now stands at 59. More than 500 more people were injured in the shooting and the stampede that followed, but amid the carnage, there are stories of heroism. Gail Davis attended the music festival where a gunman shot people from the the 32nd floor of a nearby hotel. She told CBS News one police officer led her to safety under a tent.

 

Adult Swim

In 2013, "Rick And Morty" launched on Atlanta-based Adult Swim. Since then, the animated show has developed a cult-like following, revered for its witty banter and sci-fi prowess. Justin Roiland and Dan Harmon co-created "Rick And Morty," but never imagined it would reach the level of success it has enjoyed.

Charlottesville, Killer Mike, Colin Mochrie

Cat ownership is subject to a lot of debate. Inside or outside, claws or no? We’ll hear how GPB’s Sean Powers comes nose to nose with the conflict, then we talk with Barbara King, an Emerita Professor of Anthropology at the College of William and Mary, about the ethics of cat ownership.

Athens-based band, Drive-by Truckers was co-founded by friends Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley in 1996. We revisit an interview with Patterson Hood about the band’s latest album, “American Band,” before Drive-by Truckers play this Friday, Sept. 29, at Atlanta’s Variety Playhouse.

High Road Touring

Indigo Girls -- no “the” -- have been hits since their first release in 1985. One of the most successful and influential Georgia-formed groups, the folk rock pair have gone platinum and won a Grammy, too. They have a show tonight, Sept. 27, at Atlanta Symphony Hall with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. 

Charlottesville, Killer Mike, Colin Mochrie

Indigo Girls -- no “the” -- have been hits since their first release in 1985. One of the most successful and influential Georgia-formed groups, the folk rock pair have gone platinum and won a Grammy, too. They have a show tonight, Sept. 27, at Atlanta Symphony Hall with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. We revisit an interview with one half of the group, Amy Ray.

Kevin Day Photography

In 2014, author Celeste Ng published her debut novel “Everything I Never Told You.” Hailed for its deft commentary on modern life, the book won several awards and was released in over 20 languages. Ng’s follow-up novel is “Little Fires Everywhere,” and is out this month. The book follows a picture-perfect suburban family whose peace is threatened by an enigmatic mother.

Christopher Kimball is one the biggest names in cooking. Best known as the longtime host of the popular TV and radio show, “America’s Test Kitchen,” he also published the magazine “Cook’s Illustrated.” Last year, he launched a new project called “Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street.” The Boston-based venture teaches cooking, publishes a magazine, and produces a TV show.

the artist

The B-52s have been a major part of Georgia’s music scene since the 1970s, when it formed in Athens.

Hans Canosa

As recent events bear witness, women still fight daily for respect in a world dominated by white men. Few point to that struggle as well as author Gabrielle Zevin, whose bestselling novel "The Storied Life of AJ Fikry" characterized affirmation and love in the modern world. Her latest novel, "Young Jane Young," tackles misogyny and slut-shaming. We talk with Gabrielle Zevin ahead of an appearance at the Margaret Mitchell House tonight at 7 p.m.

Charlottesville, Killer Mike, Colin Mochrie

The number of high-poverty neighborhoods in the metro Atlanta area tripled between 2000 and 2015. That’s according to a new Harvard study, which finds poverty is largely moving to the many suburbs surrounding the city. We talk about this with Kim Addie, Senior Director of Health for United Way of Atlanta. Michael Rich, a Professor in the Department of Political Science at Emory University, also joins us.

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