Celeste Headlee

Special Correspondent

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist and special correspondent for GPB. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

Dreadhead Films LLC / Screenshot by GPB

Colleges and universities across Georgia have wrapped up the semester, but one Morehouse College student has more work to do. Last year, Julien Turner took an extra credit biology assignment and turned it into a viral music video about the differences between mitosis and meiosis. The rising junior's video made it all the way to the people who work on "Sesame Street." Now, Julien and his brother are creating an educational music video for the show. Julien spoke with GPB's Leah Fleming about the project.

New research on anxiety in the workplace finds in some cases, anxiety can actually help improve employee performance. Georgia State University psychology professor Page Anderson developed a technology to help people with social anxiety by using virtual reality. The software simulates real life settings that cause patients anxiety, helping them learn to cope before they have to confront the same scenarios in the real world. 

What does it mean to have an awakening? For Christopher Paul Curtis, it meant finding his calling in his 40s. After working for more than a decade in Detroit's automobile manufacturing industry, Curtis began writing children's books about the African American experience. His 1996 novel "The Watsons Go to Birmingham" earned him a John Newbery Medal, making him the first African American man to win this honor. He won again in 2000 for "Bud, Not Buddy" and in 2008 for "Elijah of Buxton." We spoke with Curtis in 2017. 

This year's Pulitzer Prize winners and finalists were announced Tuesday. We listened back to interviews with four past and present honorees. Renee Montagne was named a 2018 finalist for her investigation examining racial disparity in maternal deaths. James Forman Jr. won the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction for his book "Locking Up Our Own:  Crime and Punishment in Black America." We also revisited conversations with Alfred Uhry, who won the Pulitzer for drama in 1988, as well as Bill Dedman, who in 1989 won the prize for investigative reporting.  

In 1981, actor Bruce Campbell first took on "The Evil Dead." The cult hit spawned two sequels, video games, Marvel comic books and a television series. "Ash vs. Evil Dead" airs its season finale later this month. We talked with Campbell last year as he prepared to attend Walker Stalk Con in Atlanta. He shared his thoughts on low budget, his cult star status and getting the chance to reinterpret the title character. 

In the year since President Trump took office, a new wave of social movements has rippled across the country. March for Science Atlanta brings together scientists, data geeks and average citizens to push for policies that support and reflect research. The group will hold its annual Rally for Science April 14. The Rally for Science keynote speaker is Emory University professor Linda DeGutis. She previously served as director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the CDC. DeGutis will speak on the importance of gun violence research. We spoke with DeGutis and March for Science organizers Louis Kiphen and Allison Halterman.

Courtesy of National Memorial for Peace and Justice

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice details a painful legacy in American history: the lynchings of thousands of African-American men, women and children. 

The newest appointed director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is already facing serious accusations. Dr. Robert Redfield has been accused of fabricating or seriously botching HIV vaccine data. President Trump's appointee also has no experience running a public health organization. This problematic news comes months after the controversy with previous CDC director, Brenda Fitzgerald.

 

Last week, Gov. Nathan Deal announced his pick for Deputy Commissioner for Rural Georgia. In January, GPB Special Correspondent Celeste Headlee looked at legislative efforts to improve services like health care and internet access in rural parts of the state. She spoke with Mark Niesse, a reporter with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and Sharon Wright Austin, Political Science Professor at the University of Florida.

 

On Second Thought Host Celeste Headlee announced in January she would step down from her post. Headlee has been with the program since it launched on GPB in 2014. Adam Ragusea talks with Headlee about her time as host, and what the future holds for public radio.

A new book by religious scholar Reza Aslan challenges some very old ideas about religion, and how we describe a higher power. The book is, “GOD: A Human History.” It hit shelves in November. We caught up with Reza Aslan ahead of an appearance in Atlanta.

All hour, we look back at some of the best conversations by Celeste Headlee, who stepped down last week as host of On Second Thought. The B-52’s have been a major part of Georgia’s music scene since the 1970’s, when it formed in Athens. The band’s meteoric rise was fueled by hits like Love Shack. We revisit our conversation with The B-52’s Kate Pierson about the release of her first solo album.

All hour, we look back at some of the best conversations by Celeste Headlee, who stepped down last week as host of On Second Thought. Colin Mochrie may have one of the fastest minds around, and a mouth to match. The comedian is best known for his role on Whose Line Is It Anyway? Audiences in Atlanta can see him live on March 16 at Dad’s Garage.

Actor George Takei first came to fame as a young “Sulu” in the original Star Trek series. But he’s since become an active voice in promoting equal rights for LGBT people. We spoke to Takei last year when the play “Allegiance” was showing in Atlanta movie theaters. The play is inspired by Takei’s experiences in a U.S. internment camp during World War II.

 

All hour, we look back at some of the best conversations by Celeste Headlee, who stepped down as host of ‘On Second Thought’ last week. The list of nicknames and titles for filmmaker John Waters is long and legend. Waters is more than a filmmaker. He’s an actor, writer, fashion icon, stand-up comedian and art collector. We talked to him last year ahead of his one-man show in Atlanta called “A John Waters Christmas.”

All hour, we looked back at some of the best conversations by Celeste Headlee, who recently stepped down as host of ‘On Second Thought."

We started off the show with our chat with Henry Winkler, best known as “The Fonz” on TV’s Happy Days. Winkler came to Georgia last summer for the Decatur Book Festival. He’s the co-creator of a popular children’s book series that centers on Hank Zipzer, a young boy with learning difficulties.

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