Celeste Headlee

Host & Exceutive Producer of "On Second Thought"

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist who hosts GPB Radio’s “On Second Thought,” weekdays from 9 – 10 a.m. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

R. Andrew Lepley

Christian McBride is a master of jazz bass. The four-time Grammy Award winner has performed with Pat Metheny, Chick Corea, and many others. We talk with him ahead of a performance at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta on Saturday, April 29.

Whitney Chirdon / GPB

The Breakroom gang is back. We’ll take aim at the controversy over Confederate monuments in New Orleans and discuss whether parents should be bringing their kids to work. Plus, we talk about a ban on saggy pants and decide whether or not the White House Correspondent’s Dinner is still relevant.

Christian McBride is a master of jazz bass. The four-time Grammy Award winner has performed with Pat Metheny, Chick Corea, and many others. We talk with him ahead of a performance at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta on Saturday, April 29.

One approach to climate change is to chip away at the human activities driving it, until greenhouse gas emissions level out. We spoke with Paul Hawken, founder of Project DRAWDOWN. He's working on solutions that he hopes will produce dramatic results to reverse global warming. Those solutions are the subject of Paul Hawken’s new book, DRAWDOWN.

Rab's Da / Foter

A recent study by WalletHub found Georgia ranks eighth in the country for the “most stressed out states.” And after all our highway issues in Atlanta, some of us are feeling even more frayed. We asked our co-workers here at GPB what’s stressing them out. It’s time to open the Gripe Bag. 

Santa Elena History Center

Last summer, archaeologists discovered a 440-year-old Spanish fort buried underground at Parris Island, South Carolina. When Fort San Marcos was built, it was near the Spanish settlement of Santa Elena. Victor Thompson is half of the team that discovered the fort. He’s Director of the Center for Archaeological Sciences at the University of Georgia in Athens, and our guest. 

Courtesy William Wegman / © William Wegman

You may not have heard William Wegman’s name, but you’ve probably seen his dogs. He loves to photograph those Weimaraners, and they’ve become icons in their own right. A new exhibit called "William Wegman: Improved Photographs" opens at the Telfair Museum in Savannah on May 12. We talk with the artist and ask him what's new.

Can we reverse climate change? Environmentalist and author Paul Hawken thinks so. He’s created a coalition of scientists and entrepreneurs. Project Drawdown aims to create 100 solutions to global warming. He talks about the effort in advance of an appearance at the Carter Center in Atlanta today, April 25.

The Breakroom gang joins Celeste to weigh in on this week's headlines.

Thousands of scientists plan to march on Washington this weekend. We look at how science is changing the world around us.

 

Before he was elected, President Trump called climate change a hoax. Now, he is rolling back policies meant to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Georges Benjamin says combating climate change is a public health issue. He’s the Executive Director of the American Public Health Association. He joined us with Peter Dykstra, the publisher of Environmental Health News.

Some of Hollywood’s greatest films were born right here in Georgia. We talked with the filmmakers behind two of these classics: "Fried Green Tomatoes" and "My Cousin Vinny."

Actor George Takei rose to fame at warp speed as Sulu in the original "Star Trek" series. He’s since become an active voice in promoting equal rights for LGBT people. “Allegiance” is a play inspired by Takei’s experiences in an American Internment camp during World War II. George Takei visited the studio when the play hit theaters in Atlanta in February.

University of Georgia professor Gregory Robinson was recently honored with an international prize for his contributions to chemistry. Dr. Robinson specializes in combining unlikely elements. He does this in his lab, and also when he uses plain language to talk about highly specialized research. The idea is to get people to care about science, even if they won’t see it applied in the world for decades. This year Dr. Robinson was named a Fellow with London’s Royal Society of Chemistry. We talked with him about being a self-described “chemical detective.”

More than 100 Atlanta teachers have joined a federal age discrimination lawsuit. The complaint alleges teachers were forced out of their jobs by an administration that was openly hostile to employees over 40. We spoke with former teacher, Cheryl Patterson. She worked for twenty-three years in the Atlanta Public School District. Georgia State University assistant professor Charlotte Alexander, also joined the conversation. She specializes in employment discrimination law.

Wikimedia Commons

Belief and fact don’t always line up. An Emory University class dives into the convoluted world of conspiracy theories, and how they influence American politics. We talked with instructor Felix Harcourt and two of his students: Carolyn Koehnke and Laura Marquez.

Lewis Hine

Early 20th century photographer Lewis Hine made his mark by documenting the working conditions in mill towns, like those in Georgia. His photos led to major reforms in child labor laws. An exhibit at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College in Tifton, Georgia tells the story of one family he documented.

More than 100 Atlanta teachers have joined a federal age discrimination lawsuit. The complaint alleges teachers were forced out of their jobs by an administration that was openly hostile to employees over 40. Cheryl Patterson is one of the plaintiffs. She worked for years in the Atlanta Public School District, before she was laid off. Also with us is Charlotte Alexander. She’s an Assistant Professor specializing in employment law at Georgia State University.

Photo Courtesy of Jon Ossoff

A Republican super PAC is paying for attack ads against a Democratic candidate in the Sixth District race. One ad claims Jon Ossoff’s ties to media outlet Al Jazeera link him to terrorism and anti-Western ideologies. We talk about the ethics of campaign ads with Andra Gillespie, Professor of Political Science at Emory University.

Olivia Reingold / On Second Thought

The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes Georgia State University professor Hector Fernandez, filmmaker and podcast producer Kalena Boller, Sam Burnham of the blog “All the Biscuits in Georgia,” and Democratic Strategist Howard Franklin.

 

BREAKROOM TOPICS:

The race to fill Tom Price’s congressional seat has attracted A LOT of candidates. Democrats hope all the attention will help flip the Sixth District from red to blue after a special election next Tuesday, April 18. We talk about the significance of the election’s outcome with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Greg Bluestein and University of Georgia professor Audrey Haynes.

Richard Watkins

This week, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution was honored as a Pulitzer Prize finalist for its investigation of thousands of doctors across the country. Reporters discovered that a disturbing number of medical professionals are sexually abusing their patients with little or no repercussions.

DoDEA Communications / Foter

As the population of Latino students increases, the number of Latino teachers in the workforce is still scarce. Gainesville and Hall County are struggling to find teachers who reflect the student population. We talk about this with Julio Cabanas, an Assistant Principal at Fair Street Elementary in Gainesville. Cabanas is also Gainesville’s first Hispanic school administrator.

A hundred years ago, the United States entered into World War I. To mark the centennial, the Atlanta History Center is taking a closer look at Georgia’s connections to the conflict. Take the red poppy, now a ubiquitous symbol in times of war. Since 1921, the artificial flower has been used to honor those who died, and it rose to prominence thanks to a former University of Georgia professor Moina Michael. She’s featured in the Atlanta History Center’s exhibit. We talk with Sue VerHoef, the center’s director of Oral History and Genealogy.

Amazon.com

A hundred years ago, the United States entered into WWI. To mark the centennial, the Atlanta History Center is taking a closer look at Georgia’s connections to the conflict. Take the red poppy, now a ubiquitous symbol in times of war.

©Nina Subin

Dominican-American novelist Junot Diaz published “The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao” a decade ago. The book won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2007. When he’s not writing, he teaches college students--he formerly taught Freedom University here in Georgia, which offers post-secondary education to undocumented immigrants.

We speak with Junot Diaz ahead of a lecture at Emory University at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 12th.

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Plans to build two nuclear reactors at a Georgia power plant may be in jeopardy. That’s after the main contractor on the project at Plant Vogtle near Waynesboro filed for bankruptcy protection last month. Tim Echols is a Georgia Public Service Commissioner.

Kevin Christopher Burke / Foter

A fraternity at the University of Georgia was recently suspended for a year for misconduct during a hazing ceremony. A ban on new bars opening in Downtown Athens took effect in February. All this points to a problem with partying.

Plans to build two nuclear reactors at a Georgia power plant may be in jeopardy. That’s after the main contractor on the project at Plant Vogtle near Waynesboro filed for bankruptcy protection last month. Tim Echols is a Georgia Public Service Commissioner. He joins us with Sue Sturgis of the online energy magazine, Facing South.

A special election is coming up in a week to fill Tom Price’s vacated seat in Georgia’s 6th Congressional district. The race is both contentious and expensive, by-products of the modern democratic process. We talked about our democracy and its health.

Centuries ago, Plato predicted that democracy is always doomed to fail. Was he right? We asked two political science experts: Robert Pirro of Georgia Southern University and Michael Evans of Georgia State University.

America was founded on principles of religious freedom. But Christianity dominates politics today. How this happened is the subject of a new book by Frances Fitzgerald. It’s called "The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America." In it, Frances Fitzgerald documents the rise and potential fall of America’s largest religious movement. She joined us to talk about the history and influence of evangelicalism.  

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