Celeste Headlee

Host & Exceutive Producer - On Second Thought

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist who hosts GPB Radio’s “On Second Thought,” weekdays from 9 – 10 a.m. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

Billy Howard

Atlanta is the fifth-highest metro area for new HIV diagnoses, according to federal dataA collection at Emory University sheds light on the HIV/AIDS crisis of the 1980s by showcasing photos by Atlanta photographer Billy Howard.

David Barbe is a legend in the Athens music scene. He runs the Chase Park Transduction recording studio, and has produced albums for Drive-By Truckers, Deerhunter, New Madrid, and many others. His new solo album, “10th of Seas,” is slated for release in August.

First, retail stores are disappearing, but the economy’s not the bad guy. Rising pressure from online shopping is causing brick and mortar stores to file for bankruptcy at a record pace in 2017. We’ll talk about how this retail downturn is affecting Georgia with Amy Wenk, reporter for The Atlanta Business Chronicle, and John Brown, Associate Professor of Economics at Georgia Southern University.

Ryan McFadin / GPB

The Breakroom gang returns to discuss coconut oil, workplace sexism, and the odd partnership of Bill Maher and Ted Nugent. We also talk about some unusual stories surrounding prisons and whether Gene Simmons can justifiably claim ownership of the “rock on” hand gesture. Guests include Christian Zsilavetz, Natalie Pawelski, Jessica Szilagyi, and Hector Fernandez.

Today, we revisit our conversation with musician Kishi Bashi. He was raised in Virginia, but has lived in Athens since 2011 when he started playing with the band Of Montreal. We spoke to him just before his concert at the Variety Playhouse last fall. He is up for "Best Album of the Year" at the Flagpole Music Awards tonight in Athens.

John Englart (Takver)/ Foter

Climate change is a problem for everyone. But climate change disproportionately harms communities of color. An Atlanta-based organization recently received $1 million from the MacArthur Foundation to help combat this. Nathaniel Smith is a founder of that organization, the Partnership for Southern Equity. He joins us with Felicia Davis, Director of the Building Green Initiative at Clark Atlanta University.

First, June 20 is World Refugee Day. The town of Clarkston, Georgia, is home to a large refugee population. It’s been called the Ellis Island of the South. We talked with Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry about how executive orders may impact the refugee community there. Then, two refugee friends from Syria share their stories. One of them arrived in Georgia right after 9/11, but before the Syrian civil war. The other is a young child, who came to the state last year. Besides calling Syria their birthplace, they share an even greater bond.

Jae C. Hong / The Associated Press

It’s been a year and a half since a deadly mass shooting in San Bernardino, California. The two attackers were killed after they gunned down 14 people. Georgia native Shannon Johnson, a graduate of Macon’s Windsor Academy, was one of them.

Courtesy of Hardy Morris

All this week we get additions to the essential Georgia Playlist from musicians playing at AthFest over the weekend, June 23-25. Today’s picks come from Athens-based singer/songwriter T. Hardy Morris. He waxes about music by James Brown and Robert Lester Folsom.

Hardy will perform the first night of AthFest at 1 a.m., June 23 at the Caledonia Lounge in Athens.

Up first, when you go into a hair salon or a cosmetics store, how much do you know about the products used on your skin or your hair? A recent study says there are dangerous chemicals in some of these products, particularly those marketed to black women. That study comes from the non-profit Environmental Working Group. Nneka Leiba is the group’s Deputy Director of Research.  She joins us with journalist A'Lelia Bundles and Atlanta hair stylist Latasha Gray.

massdistraction / Foter

A cluster of drug overdoses were reported earlier this month across Middle Georgia within a 48-hour window. As of last week, 30 overall cases and five deaths have been reported. Investigators believe a potent drug disguised as Percocet made its way across the region. We discuss the growing drug addiction crisis with Chris Hendry, Chief Medical Officer of Navicent Health.

Courtesy of Five Eight

All this week we get additions to the essential Georgia playlist from musicians playing at AthFest over the weekend, June 23-25. Athens band Five Eight is one staple in the town’s music scene. The group has performed with R.E.M., Pylon, and The Ramones. Frontman Mike Mantione adds two songs to our essential Georgia Playlist, including picks from The Glands and Vic Chesnutt. 

Five Eight performs at AthFest this Sunday on the Hull St. Stage at 6:30 p.m.

flickr

The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news.

Photo Courtesy of Karcheik Sims-Alvarado

There’s no doubt Atlanta played a big role in the civil rights movement. Now, that history is archived in a new photo book called “Atlanta and the Civil Rights Movement, 1944 -1968.” We talk with historian Karcheik Sims-Alvarado about the significance of these photographs.

Dr. Sims-Alvarado will appear at the Atlanta History Center Saturday, June 17 at 11 a.m.

One year ago, Atlanta-based Rapper Gucci Mane was released from prison. Since his release, he has been reinventing himself. He headlines a concert this weekend in Atlanta. We speak with Georgia-based hip-hop artist Makonnen and hip-hop scholar Regina Bradley about Gucci Mane’s influence on hip-hop in the South. Then, NPR Music hip-hop reporter Rodney Carmichael reviews Gucci Mane’s latest album, "Droptopwop."

Wikimedia Commons

Atlanta-based rapper Gucci Mane got out of prison last year. A month later, he released a new album and headlined at the Fox Theatre.

David Goldman / The Associated Press

The whole Georgia voting process has come under scrutiny in recent years. The Daily Yonder, a news website, compared investigations into voting violations in rural and urban areas of the state. We talked with reporter Tim Marema, who found rural voters undergo a disproportionate share of state elections boards investigations.

As the race for a single congressional district draws national attention, we take an hour to examine Georgia’s changing electorate.

First, Cobb County is the last metro county in Georgia with a white majority. But it’s expected to become "majority minority"—more than 50 percent non-white residents—in the next four years. Politically, the reliably Republican county is shifting to largely Democratic, and may flip in the upcoming 6th Congressional District election. We talk about the changing electorate in Cobb with Andra Gillespie, Political Science Professor at Emory University.

Flickr / Right to the City Alliance

Atlanta’s demographics are in flux, and city neighborhoods are following suit. A new study from Georgia State University took a comprehensive look at the last 45 years in the Atlanta metro area. It found the city is more diverse, more educated and wealthier than ever. That sounds like good news. The bad news is, the city has lost five percent of its affordable housing units every single year since 2012.

David Goldman / AP Photo

Cobb County is the last metro county in Georgia with a white majority. But it’s expected to become "majority minority"—more than 50 percent non-white residents—in the next four years. Politically, the reliably Republican county is shifting to largely Democratic, and may flip in the upcoming 6th Congressional District election. We talk about the changing electorate in Cobb with Andra Gillespie, Political Science Professor at Emory University.

Courtesy of Mary Dearborn

Honored among America’s most famous novelists, Ernest Hemingway told a lot of stories. And his celebrity life generated some too. Mary Dearborn is the author of a new biography, and it is the first Hemingway biography penned by a woman. She’s in Atlanta on Tuesday, June 13, for a book signing at the Margaret Mitchell House.

This month marks two years since the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a ban on gay marriage. The LGBT Institute at Atlanta's Center For Civil and Human Rights tells the stories of the gay rights movement. We hear from Executive Director Ryan Roemerman and board member Tim’m West.

On this episode, we discussed how thousands of Georgians were dropped from food stamp benefits this year – roughly 62 percent of the state’s recipients. The state told them they had an April 1 deadline to find a job, or lose their benefits. Melissa Johnson, Senior Policy Analyst for the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute; and Craig Schneider, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, joined us for that conversation.

 

LAWRENCE JACKSON / AP Photo

President Trump announced in a tweet he has tapped Atlanta Attorney Chris Wray to be the new FBI Director. Wray was the assistant attorney general leading the Justice Department's criminal division, from 2003 to 2005. The news came just a day before former FBI Director James Comey was scheduled to testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee.

fatseth / Foter

Thousands of Georgians were dropped from food stamp benefits this year – roughly 62 percent of the state’s recipients. The state told them they had an April 1 deadline to find a job, or lose their benefits. We talk with Melissa Johnson, Senior Policy Analyst for the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute. Also Craig Schneider, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution joins us.

Talia Crews / flickr

Lead was banned from plumbing decades ago, but as the crisis in Flint, Michigan shows, lead contamination lasts a long time. A new investigation into Georgia’s water systems finds they are not immune from lead contamination. We talked about the story with reporters Andy Miller of Georgia Health News and Brenda Goodman of WebMD.

The Breakroom gang is back to discuss the potential for Georgia to have its first African-American female governor, a debate over espionage vs. whistleblowing, and examining the feminism of Wonder Woman. Then we talk about Cumberland Island, why men refuse to seek medical help, and our favorite BBQ sauces. Our guests are Kalena Boller, Kathy Lohr, Stefan Turkheimer, and Jessica Szilagyi. 

TheClubTI / flickr

We talked with comedian Caroline Rhea, best known for her role on the ABC television show, "Sabrina the Teenage Witch." Rhea is performing June 9 and 10 at the Punchline Comedy Club in Atlanta.

ATOMIC Hot Links / Foter

The Atlantic is rising. Georgia’s sea level is expected to be six feet higher by the end of the century. The drastic change puts Savannah at risk of losing nearly 60,000 residents. It is predicted that many of those displaced will relocate to Atlanta. We talk with UGA Demographer Matt Hauer about the findings of a recent study, and Todd Holloway, a Savannah-based planning consultant.

Who Should Be Watching Our Elected Officials?

Jun 7, 2017
Discover DeKalb

Bad behavior by government officials is investigated by ethics boards. In Georgia the members of such boards are usually chosen by private organizations. But a DeKalb County judge recently ruled against that practice, saying it’s unconstitutional for people who weren’t elected to choose local government watchdogs.

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