Celeste Headlee

Host & Exceutive Producer - On Second Thought

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist who hosts GPB Radio’s “On Second Thought,” weekdays from 9 – 10 a.m. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

Sean Powers / Christian Boone

A Georgia lawsuit alleges the Boy Scouts of America covered up sexual abuse for years. The plaintiffs are two former Boy Scouts, each allegedly abused by the same scoutmaster. The Northeast Georgia Boy Scout Council, two Athens churches, and the estate of the former scoutmaster are also named in the suit.

Viking Economics

Jun 6, 2017
Melville House Books

In his new book, “Viking Economics,” author George Lakey examines why countries like Iceland, Norway, Sweden and Denmark have some of the happiest and most highly-paid workers and how we can apply their policies to our own economy. We spoke with George Lakey from the WNCU studios in Durham, NC.

Wikimedia Commons

Last month, the Atlanta City Council approved an ambitious goal: to rely solely on renewable energy by 2035. Another city that’s taken the lead with renewables is Las Vegas. The city recently met its goal for all city services to completely rely on renewable energy like wind and solar.

Lynch Family Law, Atlanta

According to a new study, more couples are feuding over politics — especially President Trump — with many of them breaking up and even heading to divorce court. We talk with study authors Nathan Richter and Lisa Kiefer. Also joining us is Dr. David Ryback. He’s a couples therapist in Atlanta and the author of several books about relationships.

 

Souls Grown Deep Foundation
Stephen Pitkin/Pitkin Studio

The High Museum of Art recently received 54 works made by contemporary African-American artists from the South as part of a gift/purchase from Souls Grown Deep Foundation. This gift will debut in 2018 as part of the museum’s permanent collection reinstallation. We talk with curator Katherine Jentleson about one incoming piece by artist Thornton Dial.

GWilber / Foter

A new investigative report from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution finds about 12 percent of cops in Georgia schools were forced out of a previous job. The officers were terminated or investigated for a wide range of reasons, including chronically poor performance, lying to superiors, sexual misconduct and inappropriate use of force. But for some, a job in the school system means a second chance. We talk with Brad Schrade, Reporter for the AJC.

emily blincoe / flickr

The Georgia Peach might well be the most iconic symbol of Georgia, but this year’s crop is suffering with losses in the range of 80 percent after a late spring freeze. It turns out the peach started out as a rarity, and is not native to our agricultural climate. We revisited a conversation with Kennesaw State University professor Tom Okie, entomologist Dan Horton, and Georgia peach farmer Al Pearson.

Whitney Chirdon / GPB

Happy Friday! The Breakroom returns to discuss controversies surrounding the Confederate flag, Trump’s cell phone, and… fruit juice. Then, we talk about the issues with Plant Vogtle, debate whether white guys should cook ethnic food, and vote on the best way to prepare shrimp. Our guests are Soumaya Khalifa, Greg Williams, Tomika DePriest, and Eric Segall.

courtesy of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation.© 2017 / The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

The High Museum of Art is presenting “Andy Warhol: Prints from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation” from June 3 through September 3. The retrospective features more than 250 prints and ephemera by Andy Warhol. We speak with Michael Rooks, Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art at the High Museum. 

Atlanta Comfort Women Memorial Task Force

"Comfort Women" refers to the women and girls trafficked by the Japanese Imperial Army during World War II. This was one of the largest known cases of human trafficking in modern history. A memorial was slated for the Center for Civil and Human Rights, but it backed out in March.

Joseph Guay

Nearly half of the Atlanta Ballet has left the company. Now, five members have formed their own, called the Terminus Modern Ballet Theater. We talk with co-founders John Welker and Tara Lee about what motivated the break, and the mission of the new group.

The Civil Rights Movement in the South is well-documented. But one author says what happened next can use more explanation. Regina Bradley is author of “Boondock Kollage: Stories from the Hip Hop South.” It offers 12 short stories chronicling Southern life in the post-civil rights era.

U.S. Department of Energy

As Republicans fight over how to budget for nuclear waste in South Carolina, an accident at a nuclear plant in Washington this month state drives home the dangers of working with plutonium.

Natasha / Flickr

A new report finds more feature films were made in Georgia than any other market. In 2016, our film production even outpaced Hollywood. We discuss the film boom with AJC Buzz Blog writer Jennifer Brett, and Craig Miller of Craig Miller Productions in Atlanta.

mdghty / Foter

The Braves — The Gwinnett Braves, that is — are changing their name. And they want your submissions for name ideas. We discuss what’s behind the rebranding, and how it’s supposed to help the minor league team grow its fan base, with Sunny Mehta, Director of Clyde Group Sports; and Joel Feldman, an Atlanta-based attorney who focuses on sports branding.

Gregg Allman

We celebrate the life and legacy of Georgia singer and songwriter Gregg Allman, who died over the weekend. Allman revolutionized rock and roll in the South. He spoke with "On Second Thought" host Celeste Headlee in 2015 shortly before he was inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame. Allman explained how he got his start singing with The Allman Brothers Band and what Macon means to him. He also revealed the origins of the song “Melissa,” and he took a stand for artists who struggle to make a living.

Freddy Cole

At this weekend’s Atlanta Jazz Festival, singer Freddy Cole takes the stage. Cole is the younger brother of jazz great Nat King Cole. Freddy released an album last year called "He  Was  The King,"  a tribute to his brother, Nat. We talked with Freddy about his storied career, and his brother’s legacy. 

Marcus Williams

Marvel’s "Black Panther" wrapped shooting last month in Atlanta. It’s just one example of a welcome change we’re seeing in comic books: the rise of black superheroes. Two Atlanta-based authors are adding to the stack with, “Tuskegee Heirs: Flames of Destiny.” The comic series weaves African-American history with an epic mission to save the planet.

Little Tybee

The band Little Tybee first came together in Atlanta in 2009. The group blends folksy lyrics with intricate musical arrangements. Their fourth album came out last summer and the band gave us a live music preview from the GPB Performance Studio. 

Little Tybee will perform this Saturday at the Atlanta Jazz Festival in Piedmont Park.

 

The history of Southern food is as rich as its flavors. Whether it's red beans and rice, fried chicken, biscuits or potlikker, the history of our region’s fare stretches far and wide – from slave plantations, to the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and into our kitchens today. 

John Amis / AP Photo

The first charter school in the United States opened up 25 years ago this fall. Since then, the idea of school choice has taken off. Charter schools can give students in struggling public schools more options, but only if those students apply to charter schools and get accepted. We’ll hear about how lotteries could address this in a feature from GPB’s Grant Blankenship.

Controversy has enveloped a recent column published by the Athens Banner-Herald. In the piece, titled “Radical Left Should Be Eradicated,” Robert Ringer writes: “As with ISIS, merely containing the Radical Left is not an acceptable alternative.

Michael Lionstar

“The Nix” is the debut novel by author Nathan Hill. It revolves around Samuel Andresen-Anderson, who finds a self-promoting reason to reunite with his mother after being abandoned as a child. She’s been accused of an unusual crime and Samuel gets hired to write a story. We talk with Nathan Hill ahead of an appearance at the Margaret Mitchell House on Monday night, May 22.

David Goldman / AP Photo

Earlier this month, the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law sued Georgia to extend voter registration in the congressional race for the 6th District. The group successfully extended the deadline, but now they want to permanently change Georgia law to reflect federal law. We talk about the controversy with Chris Joyner of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s Watchdog column and Julie Houk with LCCRUL.

Whitney Chirdon / GPB

The Breakroom gang weighs in on the latest revelations about the White House and the quick fix of I-85. Then, we discuss the ongoing Uber vs. taxi debate, whether social media is healthy, and the return of "Roseanne." The Breakroom this week includes Kathy Lohr, HB Cho, Jessica Szilagyi and Robbie Medwed.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Since President Trump reached his 100th day in office, a whirlwind of stories about Trump have dominated the headlines. Georgia voters are paying especially close attention as a special election approaches in the state’s 6th Congressional District.

drpavloff / Foter

In recent weeks, conservative voices have generated controversy over speaking appearances at colleges. Betsy DeVos, Ann Coulter and Richard Spencer have all sparked protests. We ask leaders at Georgia schools how they’re preparing to balance free speech and safety issues. Oglethorpe University President Lawrence Schall joins us with Agnes Scott College Associate Vice President Kijua Sanders-McMurtry.

Courtesy of Chuck Klosterman

Writer Chuck Klosterman has met a lot of interesting people. He’s interviewed famous film actors and rock stars for Esquire, ESPN, and the New York Times Magazine. A new collection of his writing is called “Chuck Klosterman X: A Highly Specific, Defiantly Incomplete History of the Early 21st Century.” Chuck joins us ahead of an appearance in Atlanta next Monday, May 22.

John Davisson/Invision / AP Photo

Georgia lost a music legend earlier this month. Colonel Bruce Hampton died May 1, shortly after his 70th  birthday celebration at the Fox Theatre in Atlanta. Hampton was widely regarded as the granddaddy of the jam-band scene. He played with pioneering acts like the The Hampton Grease Band and Aquarium Rescue Unit. We pay homage to the great Colonel Bruce with memories from Oteil Burbridge, Jeff Sipe, and Jesse Jarnow.

Hey, Let's Read!

May 17, 2017
Ilustrated by Dian Wang

How do children’s books represent people of color? Authors and educators have organized a festival to raise awareness and celebrate books where children of color are heroes and heroines. “Hey, Let’s Read” is happening in Atlanta on May 20. We spoke with author  Patrice McLaurin and KaCey Venning, executive director of the “Hey Let’s Read" event.

Pages