Celeste Headlee

Host & Exceutive Producer of "On Second Thought"

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist who hosts GPB Radio’s “On Second Thought,” weekdays from 9 – 10 a.m. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

A group of artists are coming together in Savannah to champion women’s rights. "The Personal is Political" is a new exhibit which explores “the relationship between personal experience and the political structures we navigate in our daily lives.” Art Rise Savannah and Planned Parenthood Southeast are teaming up for this exhibition, which opens Friday at the Art Rise Gallery. We talked about it with Heather McRae, exhibitions director at Art Rise Savannah. We also talked with Niki Johnson, whose work is featured in the exhibit.

Savannah Stopover Music Festival

The Savannah Stopover Music Festival has been going strong now for seven years. More than 80 bands will perform this weekend, including musicians Kishi Bashi and Julien Baker. Kayne Lanahan is the founder and organizer of the festival. We spoke with her about the festival and what she’s excited to see and hear this weekend.

We did a live show from The Grey restaurant in Savannah, Georgia for the Savannah Stopover Music Festival.

 

 

The Stopover Music Festival has been going strong now for seven years. More than 80 bands will perform this weekend, including musicians Kishi Bashi and Julien Baker. Kayne Lanahan is the founder and organizer of the festival. We spoke with her about the festival and what she’s excited to see and hear this weekend.

Georgia singer Jamie Barton is a rising star in the opera world. She’s only 35 but her voice has filled concert halls all over the world. In 2015, she nabbed the prestigious Richard Tucker Award. It’s a $50,000 prize sometimes called the "Heisman Trophy" of Music. But Barton hails from a place not often associated with grand opera--Rome, Georgia. We revisit a conversation with Jamie about finding a passion for opera in an unusual setting.

March is Women’s History Month, but this year doesn’t bring a lot of good news for women in Georgia. A new study found Georgia is the sixth worst state in the nation for females based on a number of factors, including wages, health care, dropout rates and life expectancy. On this show, we focus on some issues that affect the women in the state.

Photo courtesy of Adult Swim

Atlanta-based Adult Swim is bringing back “Samurai Jack,” one of Cartoon Network’s most beloved animated shows. It ran for four seasons from 2001 to 2004, but the storyline never concluded. Samurai Jack has since become a cult classic in the animation world. And after much demand, the creators have revived it for Season Five.

We’re joined by Genndy Tartakovsky, the original creator; and Scott Wills, Art Director for the series.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

In recent years, many newspapers and magazines have abandoned their print publications for an all digital format. From the Christian Science Monitor, to Newsweek, to Jet Magazine. One Decatur-based magazine is moving from digital back to print.

Elaine Read and Matt Weyandt

All this year, in our series Georgia Eats, we explore the South’s relationship with food. We’ve talked about the state’s craft beer industry. Turns out there’s also a craft chocolate movement, and it’s taken some Georgia chocolatiers far beyond the state’s borders.

Eric Norris / flickr

The Georgia Senate passed a bill last month to tighten regulation of methadone clinics. Methadone treats opioid addiction by blocking withdrawal symptoms. Georgia has more than 70 clinics, the most in the South. We talked about this with Neil Campbell, who oversees the Georgia Council on Substance Abuse.

The Georgia Senate passed a bill last month that would tighten methadone clinic regulations. Methadone treats opioid addiction by blocking withdrawal symptoms. Georgia leads the South in terms of methadone clinics; we have 71 in comparison to Tennessee's 14 and South Carolina's 20. So why do we outnumber our neighbors when it comes to methadone clinics? Neil Campbell, executive director of the Georgia Council on Substance Abuse, will weigh in on this phenomenon with help from Catoosa County Sheriff, Gary Sisk.

uillaume Ziccarelli / Courtesy of Galerie Perrotin

Artist Daniel Arsham is best known for his work which blends architecture and performance art. His many installations across the country tend to stretch the boundaries of space and reality. Now, Arsham is bringing his work to Atlanta with three installations at the High Museum of Art.

Artist Daniel Arsham is best known for his work which blends architecture and performance art. His many installations across the country tend to stretch the boundaries of space and reality. Now, Arsham is bringing his work to Atlanta with three installations at the High Museum of Art. Daniel Arsham joins us to talk about the new exhibition.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes Soumaya Khalifa of the Islamic Speakers Bureau of Atlanta, former NPR correspondent Kathy Lohr, environmental blogger Ken Edelstein, and Republican strategist Julianne Thompson.

    BREAKROOM TOPICS:

New research from the University Of Georgia links poverty to stifled brain development in children. The study also shows how those negative effects of poverty can be curbed by programs which implement positive parenting and improved family relationships. Lead researcher Gene Brody is with us to talk about the findings, and Washington University professor Deanna Barch also joins us to talk about implications of the study.

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech is creating what it calls the most environmentally friendly building in the Southeast. It collects its own water and solar power, and uses them to satisfy energy needs and irrigate nearby vegetation.

This "living building" is on track to break ground later this year. We get a preview of this new structure from Howard Wertheimer, the school’s assistant vice president for capital planning and space management.

Georgia Southern University

There is change in the works at two Georgia universities. Earlier this year, the University System Board of Regents voted to merge Armstrong State University and Georgia Southern University. The new school will keep Georgia Southern’s name. Since 2011, the university system has completed seven mergers, in the interests of efficiency and economy.

danielfoster437 / Foter

New reports from Atlanta-based health clinic CETPA find that Latino youth are being harassed and bullied more since last November’s presidential election. However, the Georgia Department of Education says it has not received complaints about bullying of Latino students in that time.

We try to sort all of this out with Georgia Health News editor Andy Miller. We also hear from Belisa Urbina, who is executive director of Ser Familia, which provides counseling and other services to Hispanic families in the metro Atlanta area.

New reports from Atlanta-based health clinic CETPA find that Latino youth are being harassed and bullied more since last November’s presidential election. However, the Georgia Department of Education says it has not received complaints about bullying of Latino students in that time. We try to sort all of this out with Georgia Health News editor Andy Miller. We also hear from Belisa Urbina, who is executive director of Ser Familia, which provides counseling and other services to Hispanic families in the metro Atlanta area.

John Amis / The Associated Press

In his speech to a joint session of congress on Tuesday night, President Trump outlined his priorities. The president has received widespread backlash since he took office in January. There have been rallies and protests, but Trump supporters, like Georgia Tea Party activist Debbie Dooley, also want their voices heard. Dooley is organizing “Spirit of America” rallies across the country. 

Andrew Harnik / The Associated Press

Today marks one month, one week, and one day since Donald Trump took office. The president is slated to address a joint session of Congress tonight, outlining his agenda. As the Trump administration rolls out its plans, the nation remains divided over issues like immigration, abortion rights and “alternative facts.” President Trump’s distrust of the media is no secret. The role of journalism in a Trump-led America is under intense scrutiny.

MARTA

All this year, we’re exploring the South’s identity with food. This is part of a series called Georgia Eats. A new exhibit at the Museum of Design Atlanta hones in on the changing landscape of sustainability.

Polybert49 / Foter

The label narcissist gets thrown around a lot, but it’s not usually used correctly. People often think "narcissistic" is a synonym for "arrogant," and that’s not true. Because narcissist is a word that many people use but often don’t understand, we break it down for you.

wallyg / Foter

Federal prosecutors are investigating bribes paid to Atlanta city officials in exchange for business contracts. Two contractors have already plead guilty to dishing out these bribes--though it is not clear who accepted them.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Scott Trubey has been covering the bribery scandal at City Hall. He joins us to help make sense of it all.

Federal prosecutors are investigating bribes paid to Atlanta city officials in exchange for business contracts. Two contractors have already plead guilty to dishing out these bribes--though it is not clear who accepted them. Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Scott Trubey has been covering the bribery scandal at City Hall. He joins us to help make sense of it all.

Olivia Reingold / GPB

The Breakroom returns with a week’s worth of crazy news to discuss. We’ll talk about why Democrats are meeting in Atlanta to elect a leader, and what it was about Milo Yiannopoulos’ recent controversy that tipped conservatives over the edge. Plus, we’ll look at research which show dogs have their own sense of morality, and another study which finds people who move around a lot lose out on friendships.

Our group this week includes:

Georgia National Guard / Foter

The Georgia Senate is one of  26 chambers in the nation that does not offer video streaming of committee meetings. Lawmakers often bar reporters and citizens from observing, and they don’t want other lawmakers recording the proceedings.

The Georgia Senate is one of 26 chambers in the nation that does not offer video streaming of committee meetings. Lawmakers often bar reporters and citizens from observing, and they don’t want other lawmakers recording the proceedings. Some senators are going rogue--using mobile phones or small cameras to stream committee meetings. Those actions have called for new rules, leading to a mess of tension and controversy. Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Kristina Torres breaks down the debate.

Our understanding of history is often shaped by a lot of things other than what we learned in school. Historian Gary Gallagher is particularly fascinated by how narratives about the Civil War develop following their portrayals in movies. Gallagher is a professor of history at the University of Virginia. We revisit a conversation with him about films that shape perceptions of history.

We dedicate our entire show to the way Southerners speak.

Where did y’all come from? We can trace the use of the word “y’all” all the way back to our colonial ancestors. Cameron Hunt McNabb, an English professor at Southeastern University, gives us a history and dialect lesson.

Plus, The Atlantic staff writer Vann Newkirk II makes the case for why “America Needs Y’all.”

The Rocketeer / Foter

The Georgia Peach might well be the most iconic fruit to symbolize Georgia. You see it on license plates, billboards, and even government documents. But the peach is actually rare to Georgia, and not native to our agricultural climate.

Tom Okie is an Assistant Professor of History Education at Kennesaw State University. His new book, called “The Georgia Peach: Culture, Agriculture, and Environment in the American South,” explores the odd history of the fruit.

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