Celeste Headlee

Host & Exceutive Producer - On Second Thought

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist who hosts GPB Radio’s “On Second Thought,” weekdays from 9 – 10 a.m. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

First, as natural predators of insects, bats are extremely important to agriculture. Researchers estimate their value to farmers in the U.S. is roughly $23 billion per year, but these are tough times for bats. A malignant fungus known as "white-nose syndrome" has killed a lot of bats over the past 10 years. We talk about this menace with wildlife pathologist Heather Fenton of the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study and Georgia State University microbiologist Chris Cornelison.

Kevin O'Mara / Flickr

Five rural hospitals closed their doors between 2013 and 2016, and many more face potential financial collapse. One effort to help curb the problem of rural health care access is the Two Georgias initiative. That program is a collaboration between healthcare providers across the state, designed to expand access to quality health care in rural parts of Georgia.

Antrell Williams / Foter

Georgia led the nation with the highest increase in personal auto insurance rates in 2016, according to a new analysis from S&P Global Market Intelligence. Though Georgia has held a top spot in insurance rate boosts over the years, outgoing Insurance Commissioner Ralph Hudgens has said he does not plan to take action.

Sweetwater Mission

Sweetwater Mission is Atlanta’s largest food pantry, and it focuses on the city’s undocumented workers. Managers at the mission say they recently turned down $35,000 of funding because it came with the stipulation that it should only be used to serve people who are in the country legally. Joining us is the Director of Operations for Sweetwater Mission, Mark Zangari.

First, Sweetwater Mission is Atlanta’s largest food pantry, and it focuses on the city’s undocumented workers. Managers at the mission say they recently turned down $35,000 of funding because it came with the stipulation that it should only be used to serve people who are in the country legally. Joining us is the Director of Operations for Sweetwater Mission, Mark Zangari, and Solveig Cunningham professor at the Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University.

David Goldman / AP Photo

The number of high-poverty neighborhoods in the metro Atlanta area tripled between 2000 and 2015. That’s according to a new Harvard study, which finds poverty is largely moving to the suburbs surrounding the city. We talk about this with Kim Addie, Senior Director of Health for United Way of Atlanta.

Ryan McFadin

Savannah’s First African Baptist Church was recently honored by the Georgia Historical Society for its role in the civil rights movement -- from housing escaped slaves under their floorboards, to being the place where Martin Luther King Jr. gave his first public speech. GPB’s Ryan McFadin recently went to the church service and brought back this audio postcard.

coolloud / Flickr

"Wonder Woman" became the highest grossing box office film this summer. And the movie "Girls Trip," which features an all-female cast, was second at the box office the weekend before last. Finally, women are taking the leads in films and in television.

Amazon

"Atlanta Noir," a new collection of short stories comes out today. The book depicts neighborhoods in the city using grim and moody devices typical of the noir genre. Joining us to talk about the dark sides of Atlanta is Tayari Jones, editor and contributing author of the new book.

First, the number of high-poverty neighborhoods in the metro Atlanta area tripled between 2000 and 2015. That’s according to a new Harvard study, which finds poverty is largely moving to the suburbs surrounding the city. We talk about this with Kim Addie, Senior Director of Health for United Way of Atlanta. Michael Rich, a Professor in the Department of Political Science at Emory University, also joins us.

Infrogmation of New Orleans / flickr

A few months ago after much debate, a Civil War monument of Robert E. Lee was removed from downtown New Orleans.

David Goldman / AP Photo

The Georgia House of Representatives had more uncontested seats in the last election cycle than any legislative chamber in the nation. Nearly all incumbents retained their seats. Only 31 of the 180 House seats featured candidates from both parties—leaving 83 percent of all seats uncontested. Andra Gillespie weighs in on why incumbents rule in Georgia. She’s a Political Science Professor at Emory University.

Yeshiva

50,000 Fulton County voters received letters saying they may be declared inactive, because they didn’t update the address on their voter registration cards. The Georgia ACLU is filing legal action against the state, claiming it’s actions are in violation of the Voter Registration Act of 1993. But is this simple housekeeping for an elections system, or part of an effort to make it harder for some people to vote? Joining us is Andra Gillespie, Emory University Political Science Professor.

First, 50,000 Fulton County voters received letters saying they may be declared inactive, because they didn’t update the address on their voter registration cards. The Georgia ACLU is threatening legal action against the state, claiming it’s actions are in violation of the Voter Registration Act of 1993. But is this simple housekeeping for an elections system, or part of an effort to make it harder for some people to vote? Joining us is Andra Gillespie, Emory University Political Science Professor.

Don Smith / GPB

We hope you heard our broadcast from the Historic Douglass Theatre. We celebrated Macon’s musical talent with a live audience. Our opening act was the current generation of that talent – teens who completed this year’s Otis Music Camp for young musicians. Listen to the highlights on this post, or see the whole performance here

Don Smith / GPB

Macon, Georgia has a rich heritage, once home to great musicians like The Allman Brothers, Little Richard, and Otis Redding. The Douglass Theatre in Macon helped to launch the career of Redding and countless other musicians of color. In celebration on Bragg Jam, "On Second Thought" taps into that history, joined at the Douglass by local guests making strides in Macon.

Atlanta band Manchester Orchestra has been going strong since 2004, having performed at big festivals like Shaky Knees, Lollapalooza, and Bonnaroo. But the band reached a new peak in fame after scoring the 2016 cult film “Swiss Army Man” with Daniel Radcliffe and Paul Dano. 

In the Breakroom this week we talk about snortable chocolate, horrible wedding playlists, and the inadequacies of Tyrannosaurus Rex. Plus, we’ll discuss the nixing of this year’s tax holiday and Ann Coulter’s latest twitter tirade. Joining us this week: Ruel Joyner, Amber Scott, Kathy Lohr, and Jessica Szilagyi.

First, another round of allegations have surfaced against musician R. Kelly. Now, parents have claimed their daughters are being held captive by the hip-hop musician, living in homes he rents out in Atlanta and Chicago, with almost every aspect of their lives controlled. R. Kelly publicly denies these allegations. Jim DeRogatis broke the story earlier this week. He’s a Buzzfeed contributor, host of WBEZ’s "Sound Opinions," and our guest.

Frank Micelotta/Invision / AP Photo

Another round of allegations have surfaced against musician R. Kelly. Now, parents have claimed their daughters are being held captive by the musician, living in homes he rents out in Atlanta and Chicago, with almost every aspect of their lives controlled. R. Kelly publicly denies these allegations. Jim DeRogatis broke the story earlier this week. He’s a Buzzfeed contributor, host of WBEZ’s "Sound Opinions," and our guest. 

Deirdre Hynes / flickr

One of the most successful and influential groups to come out of Georgia is the Indigo Girls. Since the first release in 1985, the folk rock duo has had multiple platinum albums and won a Grammy. We talked with band member Amy Ray, who performs Friday night at 8 p.m. in Atlanta at the Variety Playhouse.

 

First, last week, Georgia’s public health commissioner was named as the new head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention here in Atlanta. Brenda Fitzgerald was chosen by Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, a former Georgia congressman. The last permanent director of the CDC was Tom Frieden, who was appointed by President Obama in 2009. We re-visit our conversation with Frieden, who talked about his work with the CDC, and what he hopes to see happen there in the future.

Kindercore Vinyl

Kindercore Vinyl in Athens is bringing analog music back to Georgia. The pressing plant is the newest and only such record producer in the state, and one of fewer than 30 in the country. We talk with Kindercore president Ryan Lewis.

Other Press

On this day in 1773, the first Jewish settlers arrived in Savannah. They founded what has become the oldest Jewish congregation in the South. Nearly two centuries later, Savannah again became a refuge for Jewish immigrants. Author Jonathan Rabb explores this difficult transition in his novel, "Among The Living.” We talk to him about the book, and researching Jewish communities in Georgia. 

Savannah-Chatham Metropolitan Police Department/Savannah Morning News via AP

Over the holiday weekend, three people in Savannah were killed following a shooting and car crash. Savannah has one of the highest murder rates in Georgia.

The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel included Kennesaw State University professor Roxanne Donovan, writer and blogger Jessica Szilagyi, business owner Ruel Joyner, and Korean Daily reporter HB Cho.

Flickr

President Trump has created a commission to investigate voter fraud. Most states are refusing to hand over their registration records. But Georgia’s leadership has agreed to release extensive personal information about voters here. Blogger Sam Burnham takes issue with this. He brings us this commentary.

Max Pixel

Georgia still calls itself the Peach State. But California ships about 680,000 tons more peaches than we do. Might it be time to rebrand the Peach State? AJC columnist George Mathis III brings us this commentary.

Flickr

Sucheta Rawal is a children’s book author on a mission. She created Beato, a world traveling cat, who’s part of a broader plan to raise cultural awareness in both kids and adults.  Her latest book is “Beato Goes to Indonesia,” which just hit the shelves. The author joins us in the studio.

First, Sucheta Rawal is a children’s book author on a mission. She created Beato, a world traveling cat, who’s part of a broader plan to raise cultural awareness in both kids and adults. Her latest book is “Beato Goes to Indonesia,” which just hit the shelves. The author joins us in the studio.

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