Celeste Headlee

Special Correspondent

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist and special correspondent for GPB. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

Reid Williams / On Second Thought

The On Second Thought team says goodbye to Celeste Headlee, who ends her tenure as the show's host. In January, she announced that she was stepping down from the show, which she helped create. Celeste is moving back to Washington, DC to focus on writing her next book and guest hosting on NPR.

Wikimedia Commons

Atlanta’s Center for Puppetry Arts pays tribute this weekend to the women of the Jim Henson Company. Fran Brill of Savannah was the first female puppeteer Henson hired for Sesame Street. We talked with her about her long career on one of the most recognizable streets in America.

Ker-Chunk Games

Video games are a multi-billion dollar worldwide industry. Still, women make up only 20 percent of people working in the gaming industry. On top of that, most games these days are marketed to men and centered around very masculine protagonists. A new Atlanta-based game looks to challenge the stereotypes.

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

We spent the hour hearing a panel discussion that Celeste Headlee hosted last week at the Carter Center in Atlanta. This conversation about workplace diversity was part of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation's Our Compelling Interests series.

David Goldman / AP Photo

Last month, Atlanta became the first Georgia city to adopt inclusionary zoning ordinances. This requires developers to reserve housing for low income Atlantans around the Beltline and Mercedes Benz stadium. Is this a step in right direction for creating more affordable housing?

Nikki Giovanni is one of the most celebrated poets of her generation. Her unique style weaves together strong family ties, experiences as an African American woman growing up in the South, and her pride as an activist. Giovanni speaks Wednesday night at Atlanta’s Lovett School. She tells us that the country needs to come together amid so many divisions.

Morehouse College

For more than a hundred years, America’s historically black colleges and universities have graduated many of our most dynamic and influential citizens. However, some educators worry a quarter of those schools could be gone within the next 20 years. A new PBS documentary airing Monday, February 19 on PBS explores the complex history of HBCUs.

Last week’s deadly school shooting in Parkland, Florida was followed by scenes we have seen all too often. In 2013, a similar scene played out at Decatur’s Ronald E. McNair Discovery Learning Academy. Thankfully, no one was killed.

Last week’s deadly school shooting in Parkland, Florida was followed by scenes we have seen all too often. In 2013, a similar scene played out at Decatur’s Ronald E. McNair Discovery Learning Academy. Thankfully, no one was killed. A short film based on that incident is nominated for an Academy Award. We talked with the film’s writer and director, Reed Van Dyk.

For more than a hundred years, America’s historically black colleges and universities have graduated many of our most dynamic and influential citizens.

What would you do for true love? How about travel back in time, to the middle of bloody war you already know ends badly for your beloved? That’s the dilemma of the heroine in the “Outlander” series of novels. Since the first book came out 27 years ago, the story has spawned a television series, a graphic novel and even a musical. All this was born from the mind of author Diana Gabaldon, who holds advanced degrees in marine biology and behavioral ecology. Gabaldon visits with us before an appearance at the Savannah Book Festival, 6 p.m. , February 15.

Andrew Harnik / The Associated Press

Since we did our show live from Savannah for the Savannah Book Festival, we organized a special edition of The Breakroom featuring all authors. The panel included writer Tayari Jones, Christina KellyNicki Salcedo, and Joe Hill.

 

Victoria Will

We talked with Atlanta-native Tayari Jones. Her latest novel, “An American Marriage,” was included this month in Oprah’s Book Club. Jones is in Savannah this weekend for the annual Savannah Book Festival

Maura Currie / GPB News

Urban archeology has unearthed centuries-old artifacts from beneath Atlanta. And lots of it is simply very old trash, leftover from landfills and dumps. Now, a team from Georgia State University is working with students to catalog the artifacts and teach history, writing and anthropology in the process. It’s called the Phoenix Project, and we had three of the faculty involved with it in the studio: Jeffrey Glover, Brennan Collins, and Robin Wharton.

Lauren Packard / NOAA/Flickr

Right whales are Georgia’s state aquatic mammal, and around this time of year they’re usually right off our coast having their calves. But this year, only three whales have been spotted, and none of them are calves. Environmental changes and human activity seem to be jeopardizing the endangered whales’ livelihoods.

So, how worried should we be? With us by phone was Clay George, biologist and head of right whale work for the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

 

 

  

 

Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Bert Roughton worked with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution for 37 years. Last month, he retired from his role as Senior Managing Editor. But before he left, he wrote an opinion page dedicated not to his career -- but to the growing distrust between government, media, and the public. We talk with Bert about his time at the AJC and his vision for government transparency. We also talk about this with Carroll Doherty, Director of Political Research at the Pew Research Center.

It’s been about six months since Atlanta-based credit rating company Equifax admitted it had been hacked. More than 140 million people were exposed by the data breach to possible ID theft. According to documents the company recently handed over to members of Congress, even more sensitive information was obtained as a result of the breach. We talk about latest with the investigation into the breach with Tamar Hallerman, Washington D.C. correspondent for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Atlanta based Adult Swim is home to a number of hit TV shows like Rick and Morty, Squidbillies, and the Venture Brothers. Many of us at On Second Thought are huge fans. So imagine our delight to find Adult Swim is just five minutes away. Last month, we took a tour of their studios. We chatted with many producers about not just their TV shows, but their streaming shows as well. Adult Swim now offers a full host of online, live streamed programs.

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