Celeste Headlee

Host & Exceutive Producer - On Second Thought

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist who hosts GPB Radio’s “On Second Thought,” weekdays from 9 – 10 a.m. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

 

The holidays mean lots of food and lots of trash. Atlanta began taking a different approach to waste earlier this year, in partnership with Rubicon Global, a waste management company. They  say this “smart trash” model cuts costs for the city, and helps combat climate change. We talked with Atlanta Chief Resilience Officer Stephanie Stuckey-Benfield and Rubicon Global’s Michael Allegretti.

 

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Behind many great recipes, you’ll find stories of immigration. That’s certainly the case in the kitchen of Pati Jinich. Her grandparents immigrated from Poland to Mexico. Now, Pati is a chef and cookbook author, renowned for her Jewish-Mexican fare. GPB’s Emily Cureton caught up with her last week while she was cooking at the General Muir restaurant in Atlanta.

Jeff Chiu / AP Photo

Atlanta has the third highest eviction rate in the country. That’s according to a new study by the rental service Apartment List. The eviction rate is just below six percent, right behind Memphis and Phoenix. We talk with Kimberly Charles, an attorney with the Atlanta Legal Aid Society.

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

In recent years, Atlanta has been on a mission to turn around failing public schools, while many parents turn to charter schools. David Osborne is author of the new book, “Reinventing America’s Schools.” He suggests treating all schools a bit like charter schools would improve the situation. We talk with David Osborne ahead of an appearance in Atlanta.

Two new types of spiders have been found in Athens, Georgia. That’s bad news if you’re an arachnophobe, but great news if you’re an arachnologist. Bud Freeman is the Director of the Georgia Museum of Natural History. He and his team of fellow spider hunters are leading the search for new types of eight-legged creatures in the Southeast.

In recent years, Atlanta has been on a mission to turn around failing public schools, while many parents turn to charter schools. David Osborne is author of the new book, “Reinventing America’s Schools.” He suggests treating all schools a bit like charter schools would improve the situation. We talk with David Osborne and Maureen Downey, Education Reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

We dedicate an entire show to the Southern drawl. Y’all listen up now…

Where did y’all come from, anyway? We can trace the use of the word all the way back to colonial ancestors. Cameron Hunt McNabb, an English professor at Southeastern University, gives us a history and dialect lesson. Plus, The Atlantic staff writer Vann Newkirk II makes the case for why y'all is needed.

Brynn Anderson / The Associated Press

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore has been accused of sexual misconduct by five women. Many high ranking Republicans have called on him to drop out of the race, but one state poll says Moore enjoys support by many Alabama evangelicals. This could be part of a bigger picture.

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore has been accused of sexual misconduct by five women. Many high ranking Republicans have called on him to drop out of the race. But one state poll says Moore enjoys support by many Alabama evangelicals. This could be part of a bigger picture. In 2011, the Public Religion Research Institute found only 30 percent of white evangelicals thought elected officials who commit an immoral act could still fulfill their public duties. In 2016, that number had more than doubled, to 72 percent. We talk with Dan Cox,  Director of Research for PRRI.

ATRIA BOOKS

Chilean-American novelist Isabel Allende has written a lot about the immigrant experience. Allende is a former journalist who fled Chile after the 1973 assassination of her uncle, who was that country’s president. She’s in Atlanta on Thursday, November 16, to promote her latest book, "In the Midst of Winter." She's speaking at the Atlanta History Center.

University of Georgia Press

Modern gynecology was largely born in the antebellum South -- because some of this country’s first gynecologists conducted experiments on enslaved women.  This history is explored in a new book, “Medical Bondage: Race, Gender and The Origins Of American Gynecology.” Our guest is author Deirdre Cooper Owens, an Assistant Professor at Queens College in New York. Her book came out November 15, on the University of Georgia Press.

American College of Radiology / National Cancer Institute

Good news: breast cancer death rates dropped by nearly 40 percent in the last three decades. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosis for U.S. women. Skin cancer’s first. But there is bad news. Black women continue to die at a higher rate than whites, especially in the South.  But some states have eliminated the racial disparity in breast cancer deaths. These are recent findings by the Atlanta-based American Cancer Society.

DC Pest Controll

Savannah attracts a whole lot of tourists. And, if you believe pest control experts at Terminix, an over-supply of rats. Terminix recently named Savannah the most rodent-infested city in America, overtaking Atlanta, which has seen its fair share of rodent woes. When Atlanta was still tops for rats, we invited Jason Chapman, vice-president of sales at Peachtree Pest Control to talk about why the city found itself home to so many rodents.

Tase and Tell

An exhibit at the University of Georgia highlights items from the state’s gold rush. Wright State Environmental History Professor Drew Swanson calls the era an ugly chapter of Georgia’s past, rife with environmental damage in the North Georgia mountains, and a driver of the forced eviction of Cherokee people. Drew Swanson joins us to talk about gold’s lasting legacy

Good news: breast cancer death rates dropped by nearly 40 percent in the last three decades. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosis for U.S. women. Skin cancer’s first. But there is bad news. Black women continue to die at a higher rate than whites, especially in the South. But some states have eliminated the racial disparity in breast cancer deaths. These are recent findings by the Atlanta-based American Cancer Society. Carol DeSantis is Director of Breast and Gynecological Surveillance for the organization, and our guest.

This summer, 27 so-called micronations gathered in Dunwoody, Georgia for MicroCon 2017. A micronation is defined as a small, self-proclaimed entity which claims to be an independent sovereign state, but is not acknowledged as such by any recognized sovereign state, or by any supranational organization. Vice News produced a documentary from the convention, which featured many micronations based within Georgia. We get the inside scoop from Vice Media Video Producer Oliver Noble.

Foter

The rate of suicide in rural America is climbing. A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds those in rural counties are about six percent more likely to die by suicide than those in cities. We talk about this troubling trend with Andy Miller, Editor for Georgia Health News. Asha Ivey-Stephenson, Behavioral Scientist for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, also joins us. 

Takénobu

Atlanta cellist Nick Ogawa, better known as "Takénobu," takes the cello beyond the orchestra. His latest album, “Reversal,” uses loops and percussive sounds to create thick soundscapes. We catch up with Takénobu ahead of a performance at Eddie’s Attic in Decatur this Sunday, November 19. 

UNODC / http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/data-and-analysis/statistics/data.html

As a nation, we’re having more tough conversations about sexual violence and harassment, as more women step forward to accuse powerful men of abusing their positions. We have profiles for killers and terrorists, what about people who commit sexual assault and rape?

Left Bank Books

A new book explores why so many young men of color wind up in prison. “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America,” is the work of Yale Law School Professor James Forman, Jr. His father was a leader of SNCC -- the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Forman, Jr. is a graduate of Atlanta’s Roosevelt High. He joins us in the studio. 

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Coal ash is a toxic substance. For years it was haphazardly dumped into rivers and ponds. Within the last 10 years or so, there has been a push to clean up the way coal ash is disposed. Georgia Power has vowed to close all its dump ponds. We talk with Chris Bowers, a senior attorney for the Southern Environmental Law Center. We also hear from Jen Hilburn of Altamaha Riverkeeper.

A new book explores why so many young men of color wind up in prison. “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America” is the work of Yale Law School Professor James Forman, Jr. His father was a leader of SNCC -- the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Forman, Jr. is also a graduate of Atlanta’s Roosevelt High. He joins us in the studio.

R.E.M.

R.E.M.’s hit record “Automatic for the People” was released 25 years ago. In 1992, the album hit #2 on the Billboard 200 charts, and became certified 4x platinum in the United States. The record is getting an anniversary re-release, out tomorrow, November 10. We talk with Athens’ own Mike Mills, R.E.M.’s bass player.

Comedian Jim Gaffigan has appeared in “That 70s Show,” “Fargo,” “Bob’s Burgers,” and many times on “Law and Order.” But he may be best known for his stand-up comedy specials, and two seasons of "The Jim Gaffigan Show." We catch up with him ahead of a live show in Atlanta this weekend.

jufchicago / flickr

Comedian Jim Gaffigan has appeared in "That '70s Show," "Fargo," "Bob’s Burgers," and, of course, "Law and Order." However, he may be best known for his stand up specials, and two seasons of "The Jim Gaffigan Show." Gaffigan is in Atlanta this weekend for a live show. He told us there is an argument for comedians not to talk about the news.

 

On Tuesday Atlantans voted for a new mayor and other important city positions. We analyze election day results with Andra Gillespie, Professor of Political Science at Emory University. And Greg Bluestein, Political Reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

The Athens music scene is legendary and always booming. Since it became famous for launching bands like R.E.M., the B-52s, and countless others, it has only grown in the number of bands, talent, and musical quality. Some Athenians are documenting the music and history of that town's scene. 

Ryan Basden

This spring, voter data was compromised at an election center at Kennesaw State University. State voters filed a lawsuit this summer, alleging the state could have prevented the suspected hacking. Shortly after, Georgia officials wiped the election data. Now state lawmakers are looking for answers.

John Bazemore / AP Photo

On Tuesday Atlantans voted for a new mayor and other important city positions. In Atlanta’s mayoral race, two women advanced to a runoff election. Elsewhere in the state, Democrats picked up two house seats in northeast Georgia and flipped a senate seat long held by the GOP. We analyze election day results with Andra Gillespie, Professor of Political Science at Emory University. And Greg Bluestein, Political Reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Three former sheriff’s deputies in Washington County, Georgia face murder charges. A man they tased this summer died. The incident was captured on video. We talk with GPB’s Grant Blankenship, who is following the case.

Many of Georgia’s historic theaters need repairs. This month, the Atlanta-based Fox Theatre Institute gave $85,000, shared by four theaters, for historic preservation. One recipient is Rome’s DeSoto Theatre. We learn about that theater’s legacy from Rome resident Tommy Lam, whose grandfather started the DeSoto.

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