Celeste Headlee

Host & Exceutive Producer - On Second Thought

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist who hosts GPB Radio’s “On Second Thought,” weekdays from 9 – 10 a.m. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

Mikhail Chekmezov / Flickr

Empathy is a crucial human ability. It’s the basis of the golden rule: do unto others as you’d have them do unto you. And yet, empathy is not all that well understood. Many people confuse empathy with sympathy, and they are not the same. Since this is a term that’s often used, but generally misunderstood, we break it down for you.

Alan Rhew

When we think of Southern Gothic, a lot of names come to mind: Flannery O’Connor, William Faulkner, Cormac McCarthy. Critics include North Carolina-based author David Joy in that category. His new novel, "The Weight of this World," takes us into a gritty, seamy world in rural Appalachia. Characters are tormented by their own demons, roused by painful memories of a small town and memories of war.

Phil Provencio / flickr

Some comedians let nothing keep them from the stage. Ali Wong was in her third trimester when she performed for her Netflix comedy special, “Baby Cobra.” We talked with Ali Wong ahead of her performance at The Tabernacle in Atlanta on Friday, May 12.

Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press

The stocks of the two biggest private prison companies in the nation saw a big boost shortly after President Trump took office. One of those companies is the GEO Group, which currently operates detention facilities in Georgia.

Penguin Random House

Heck, everyone loves tacos -- or so says the new children’s book, “Dragons Love Tacos Two.” In this sequel, the unthinkable occurs: every taco in the world disappears. And it’s up to dragons -- the biggest taco fans -- to remedy this catastrophe and save the tacos. We hear from the duo behind the book series: writer Adam Rubin and illustrator Daniel Salmieri.

Matthew Hashiguchi

Asian-Americans are America’s fastest growing ethnic group. Many Asians and Pacific Islanders are settling in Georgia. But in filmmaker Matthew Hashiguchi’s experience, people don't always welcome them to the South. We talked with him about his documentary, "Good Luck Soup," which is airing on ​GPB’s Knowledge channel Sunday, May 14 at 5 p.m.

Mike Dunn / flickr

Retail stores are disappearing, but the economy is not the bad guy. Rising pressure from online shopping is causing brick and mortar stores to file for bankruptcy at a record pace in 2017. We talked about how this retail downturn is affecting Georgia with Atlanta Business Chronicle reporter Amy Wenk and Georgia Southern University professor John Brown.

Riverdale Avenue Books

If romance novels aren’t appealing to you, try adding some Southern love and death. That’s the premise behind the new romance anthology, “Gone with the Dead.” It’s inspired by two Atlanta classics: “Gone with the Wind” and “The Walking Dead.” We talked with the anthology's editor Lori Perkins, who is the founder of Riverdale Avenue Books.

TIDAL

Beyoncé’s "Lemonade" album took the nation by storm last year. The album sparked a massive conversation about race issues in this country and last month "Lemonade" was recognized with a Peabody Award from the University of Georgia.

MarkCiz / flickr

Do you get enough sleep? A good night’s rest can depend on lot of things: your dinner, your kids, where you live, and even your race. A new book by Emory University professor Ben Reiss explores how we got so sleep-obsessed, yet sleep-deprived.

When you think of bullies, you might think of kids at school. But bullying doesn’t stop with school. A recent study shows women and minorities are most likely to be targeted in the workplace. We spoke with study authors Brandon Attell from the Health Policy Center at Georgia State University and Linda Treiber, a professor of Sociology at Kennesaw State University.

 

leebyrne68 / flickr

Atlanta-based Coca-Cola recently announced it would lay-off 1,200 workers. This comes after similar downturns in recent years.

Whitney Chirdon / On Second Thought

The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes Steve Brown of the Fayette County Board of Commissioners, Natalie Pawelski of Cater Communications, Georgia State University professor Eric Segall, and Kennesaw State University professor Roxanne Donovan.

We talk with singer and songwriter Rhiannon Giddens, who is best known as the lead vocalist with the string band, the Carolina Chocolate Drops. She’s got a new solo album, "Freedom Highway." It tells the stories of oppressed African Americans. We talked with her ahead of a performance at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta on Saturday, May 6 at 8 p.m.

Thinking of getting a new credit card or buying a house? Your credit score can determine those things, and a whole lot more. A new report puts Georgia at the top of the list for worst credit in the country.  That’s according to the website, cardratings.com. Georgia’s lousy rating is the result of low credit scores, foreclosures, unemployment and bankruptcy.

Photo Courtesy of Anna Vocino

Actress and writer Anna Vocino wears many hats. She’s appeared in side roles on shows like “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” and “The Office,” and has done voice-over work for numerous cartoons and video games. She’s also a passionate food writer, and blogs about her struggle with celiac disease. Her new book, “Eat Happy,” explores the ways to eat gluten-free, and have it taste good, too.

Malingering / Flickr

A recent article from The New Yorker magazine called barbecue the most political food in America. The author argues barbecue has its roots in racism and discrimination. We discuss this history with Chuck Reece, editor of the Bitter Southerner. Also joining us are food writers Michael Twitty, and Kathleen Purvis of the Charlotte Observer.

Actress and writer Anna Vocino wears many hats. She’s appeared in side roles on shows like “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” and “The Office,” and has done voice-over work for numerous cartoons and video games. She’s also a passionate food writer, and blogs about her struggle with celiac disease. Her new book, “Eat Happy,” explores the ways to eat gluten-free, and have it taste good, too. We talk to her ahead of a book signing this Saturday, May 6.

A class at Georgia Tech focuses on the history and community of Auburn Avenue in Atlanta. The neighborhood was home to Martin Luther King Jr. and an important setting for the civil rights movement in the 1960s. Now, Georgia Tech students are documenting that community, while trying to raise awareness of issues there. We speak with Professor Nassim JafariNaimi, and students Nick Tippens and Ali Yildirim.

anoldent / Foter

A group of private landowners wants to develop 1,000 acres on Georgia’s Cumberland Island. Opponents say the rezoning would negatively impact wildlife and tourism.

Georgia’s system for deciding parole just changed for the first time in a decade. Last month, the State Board of Pardons and Paroles approved new guidelines for determining if inmates should get out of prison early. One of the changes is, a person’s prior arrest history, rather than just their conviction history, can color that decision. Adam Gelb is director of the Public Safety Performance Project with the Pew Charitable Trusts. Also joining us is Marissa McCall Dodson. She’s the public policy director with the Southern Center for Human Rights.

David Goldman / The Associated Press

Georgia’s system for deciding parole just changed for the first time in a decade. Last month, the State Board of Pardons and Paroles approved new guidelines for determining if inmates should get out of prison early. One of the changes includes a person’s prior arrest history, rather than just their conviction history.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

A new bill to keep the federal government funded through September does not include cuts to Planned Parenthood.

Shealah Craighead / The White House

President Trump has signed more than 20 executive orders since his January inauguration. Still, many news organizations don’t always seem clear on what an executive order really is, or how it’s different from other documents a president signs. We break down what an executive order means.

 

We then chatted with University of Houston lecture Michelle Belco, who studies the history of executive orders.

Lucas Theatre for the Arts

All five employees at the historic Lucas Theatre in Savannah were recently fired by the theater's board. There are now questions about the future of the Lucas. The Savannah College of Art and Design acquired the theater in 2002. We talked with Connect Savannah editor-in-chief Jim Morekis, who has been following the story.

R. Andrew Lepley

Christian McBride is a master of jazz bass. The four-time Grammy Award winner has performed with Pat Metheny, Chick Corea, and many others. We talk with him ahead of a performance at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta on Saturday, April 29.

Whitney Chirdon / GPB

The Breakroom gang is back. We’ll take aim at the controversy over Confederate monuments in New Orleans and discuss whether parents should be bringing their kids to work. Plus, we talk about a ban on saggy pants and decide whether or not the White House Correspondent’s Dinner is still relevant.

Christian McBride is a master of jazz bass. The four-time Grammy Award winner has performed with Pat Metheny, Chick Corea, and many others. We talk with him ahead of a performance at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta on Saturday, April 29.

One approach to climate change is to chip away at the human activities driving it, until greenhouse gas emissions level out. We spoke with Paul Hawken, founder of Project DRAWDOWN. He's working on solutions that he hopes will produce dramatic results to reverse global warming. Those solutions are the subject of Paul Hawken’s new book, DRAWDOWN.

Rab's Da / Foter

A recent study by WalletHub found Georgia ranks eighth in the country for the “most stressed out states.” And after all our highway issues in Atlanta, some of us are feeling even more frayed. We asked our co-workers here at GPB what’s stressing them out. It’s time to open the Gripe Bag. 

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