Celeste Headlee

Host & Exceutive Producer of "On Second Thought"

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist who hosts GPB Radio’s “On Second Thought,” weekdays from 9 – 10 a.m. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

When you think of a fictional "hero," you might picture a strong, capable character. Someone who exudes confidence and is revered by those around them. But the heroes of Yiddish literature are very different.

Atlanta is the fifth highest metro area for rates of new HIV diagnoses, but recent data shows annual infection rates in the state are dropping, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We learned more about the fight to stop the spread of HIV and AIDS with Tiffany Roan, the state’s regional director for the AIDS Healthcare Foundation.

AP Photo

On October​ ​12,​ ​1958, the​ ​Temple,​ ​Georgia’s​ ​largest synagogue,​ ​was​ ​bombed.​ ​Nobody was hurt in the explosion, but the community was shaken. A new play at the Alliance Theater in Atlanta recalls the attack, and its lasting effects. We spoke to Jimmy Maize, playwright and director of “The Temple Bombing.”

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Atlanta is the fifth highest metro area for rates of new HIV diagnoses, but recent data shows annual infection rates in the state are dropping, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Georgia scored a big win in a long-running legal battle with Florida. Last week, a special master appointed by the U.S. Supreme Court said the high court should refuse Florida's request to cap Georgia’s water use. Florida argues the cap is needed because Georgia’s high rate of water consumption is dampening its oyster industry and state economy. E&E News reporter Amanda Reilly joins us to talk about this latest development in a decades-old water war.

Akhenaton06 / Foter

In 1967, the first African-American students were admitted to the Medical College of Georgia. Dr. Joseph Hobbs, one of the first black students to graduate, was the first black faculty member at the school.

Doctor Hobbs is now Chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia, and is organizing the 50th anniversary of desegregation at that college. He joins us from Augusta to discuss decades of work in elevating African-American doctors at the school.

Photo courtesy of Trudy Nan Boyce

Author and former Atlanta Police Officer Trudy Nan Boyce published her first novel, “Out of the Blues,” last year. That story follows the detective work of Sarah Alt--a.k.a “Salt”--as she investigates often gruesome crimes in the Atlanta area.

The second installment of Detective Salt’s story, called “Old Bones,” follows the fictional shooting of students at Spelman College. That book hits shelves February 21. Author Trudy Nan Boyce join us to discuss her new novel.

niksnut / flickr

Georgia scored a big win in a long-running legal battle with Florida. Last week, a special master appointed by the U.S. Supreme Court said the high court should refuse Florida's request to cap Georgia’s water use. Florida argues the cap is needed because Georgia’s high rate of water consumption is dampening its oyster industry and state economy. E&E News reporter Amanda Reilly joined us to talk about this latest development in a decades-old water war.

Sean Powers and Olivia Reingold / On Second Thought

Since we did our show live from Savannah for the Savannah Book Festival, we organized a special edition of The Breakroom featuring all authors. The panel included Alejandro Danois, Karin Slaughter, Nicki Salcedo, and Mike Lowery.

One of the featured authors at the festival is Forbes Financial Columnist John Tamny, who is author of the book “Who Needs the Fed?” We take a look at the role of the fed, and ask Tamny about how it may change in the Trump administration. The Fed also will see some big changes this month in Atlanta, as the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta steps down.

 

 

Emory University / flickr

Dennis Lockhart, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, will step down this month. The Federal Reserve may be in for changes in the months ahead. It is an important agency, but there’s one problem. Not a lot of average Americans understand what the Fed is or what it does. So, we explain it in another edition of our Break It Down series.

New research from the Pew Research Center finds over a quarter of Americans adults haven’t read a book in the last year--in part or in whole. That includes all forms of reading, such as print, e-books, and audio books. We talk about this with Austin Dickson, Executive Director of Literacy Action, and Emily Rubin, Educational Outreach Specialist for the Marcus Autism Center in Atlanta.

There’s a major climate change conference on Thursday in Atlanta. It’s happening at the Carter Center, but only because it was canceled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We talked with Georges Benjamin of the American Public Health Association, who is giving the keynote address at the conference. We also checked in with environmental journalist Peter Dykstra of Environmental Health News.

University of Georgia Press

Food is an integral part of the South’s identity, and all this year, we’re paying homage to Southern cuisine. It’s a series we call Georgia Eats. A lot of chefs and food writers know the name Mrs. S.R. Dull. In 1928, she wrote the book "Southern Cooking," which has been described as the "bible" of Southern cooking. That got us thinking if there are any other cookbooks that rise to that level.

Greenland Travel / Flickr

There’s a major climate change conference on Thursday in Atlanta. It’s happening at the Carter Center, but only because it was canceled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We talked with Georges Benjamin of the American Public Health Association, who is giving the keynote address at the conference.

On this special Valentine's Day show, we spend the day talking to Georgia couples who’ve kept romance alive even though they work together. We also talk about the challenge of being single, along with the falling divorce rate.

We start with a story of truly enduring love. J.B. and Lynette Tuttle have been married for more than 70 years. The Savannah couple is now in their 90s. They're both retired and live together in a nursing home. GPB's Sean Powers brings us their timeless story of romance.

gopleader / flickr

Betsy DeVos was confirmed last week as President Donald Trump’s secretary of education. She has been an aggressive proponent of school choice, but her definition of school choice may not be the same as how other people define it. School choice is one of those phrases that gets thrown around a lot, but is often misunderstood. So, we explain it in another edition of our Break It Down series.  

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Hundreds of refugees from Syria now call Georgia home. We hear from two of them, who have become good friends. One of them is a man who arrived in Georgia right after 9/11, but before the Syrian civil war. The other is a young child, who came to the state last year. Besides calling Syria their birthplace, they share an even greater bond.

 

Repealing the Affordable Care Act could cost Georgia more than $20 million a year. It would also cost the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nearly $900 million—12 percent of the agency’s budget. Republicans leading the repeal effort call the money a “slush fund.” That means to imply that millions of untracked dollars are used for projects that have little benefit for public health. Joining us to discuss this is Andy Miller, editor for Georgia Health News.

Raed Mansour / Foter

Repealing the Affordable Care Act could cost Georgia more than $20 million a year. It would also cost the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nearly $900 million—12 percent of the agency’s budget.

Actor George Takei first warp sped to fame as a young Sulu in the original "Star Trek" series. But he’s since become an active voice in promoting equal rights for LGBT people. “Allegiance,” a play inspired by George’s experiences in an American Internment camp during World War II, is hitting movie theaters next week--including eight in the metro Atlanta area. Georgie Takei is in the studio to talk about the play, and the parallels he sees draws between his past and current events.

Keenan Jones / GPB

The Breakroom gang is back, and we’ve got a lot to talk about. We’ll discuss whether Super Bowl performances by Lady Gaga and The Schuyler Sisters need really be controversial. Plus, we’ll look at why the online dictionary is going viral, and how social media sites are stepping up to combat fake news. 

The Breakroom for today is:

TEDxKyoto / Flickr

Actor George Takei first warp sped to fame as a young Sulu in the original "Star Trek" series. But he’s since become an active voice in promoting equal rights for LGBT people.

Grammy nominated singer/songwriter Andra Day visited Georgia in December. Day has sung at the White House and on the BET Awards show. She was discovered, in part, by Stevie Wonder, who appeared alongside her in an iconic Apple TV ad in 2015. Her song “Rise Up” went multi-platinum. She joins us to talk about her explosive career.

Then, we hear a pair of songs from our essential Georgia Playlist. Jason Rodgers, conductor of the all-black orchestra known as “Orchestra Noir,” joins the show to share two of his favorite Georgia tunes from Ray Charles and James Brown.

Photo courtesy of Sheri Riley

Author Sheri Riley began her professional life at a record label in Atlanta. As marketing director at LaFace Records, she helped put numerous hip hop artists on the map -- TLC, Toni Braxton, and Usher, to name a few. But Sheri gave all that up to research and write about healthy lifestyles. She joins us to talk about her new book, “Exponential Living,” which comes out this week.

Author Sheri Riley began her professional life at a record label in Atlanta. As marketing director at LaFace Records, she helped put numerous hip hop artists on the map -- TLC, Toni Braxton, and Usher, to name a few. But Sheri gave all that up to research and write about healthy lifestyles. She joins us to talk about her new book, “Exponential Living,” which comes out this week.

jontangerine / Foter

The battle for equal rights in America has centered around many modes of transportation--buses, trains, and streetcars for example. But one more form of travel should be added to that list: Airplanes. That’s the assertion of a new book from UGA Press called “Jim Crow Terminals: The Desegregation of American Airports.” The book covers the largely undocumented segregation at Southern airports in the 20th century. With us to discuss this is the author, Anke Ortlepp. She’s a Professor of North American and British History at the University of Kassel in Germany.

MarkMoz12 / Foter

A new report from housing site Trulia suggests house flipping activity has increased to the highest in a decade in 2016, with the Atlanta metro area ranking eighth in the country. They find that in 2016, 7.9 percent of all home sales in Atlanta were house flips, a modest 0.6 percent jump from the year before. We speak with Ralph McLaughlin, Chief Economist for Trulia, about these findings.

slgckgc / flickr

A recent report from the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau shows Georgia leads most states in harassment by debt collectors. Often these are for debts people already paid, or don’t even owe. Beth Kobliner is on a mission to make sure you and your kids don’t fall prey to one of these collectors.

This February is Black History Month, a time when the nation honors the contributions of African Americans. On Second Thought host Celeste Headlee says she doesn't really like Black History Month, but not for the reasons you might expect. 

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