Celeste Headlee

Host & Exceutive Producer - On Second Thought

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist who hosts GPB Radio’s “On Second Thought,” weekdays from 9 – 10 a.m. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

The Civil Rights Movement in the South is well-documented. But one author says what happened next can use more explanation. Regina Bradley is author of “Boondock Kollage: Stories from the Hip Hop South.” It offers 12 short stories chronicling Southern life in the post-civil rights era.

U.S. Department of Energy

As Republicans fight over how to budget for nuclear waste in South Carolina, an accident at a nuclear plant in Washington this month state drives home the dangers of working with plutonium.

Natasha / Flickr

A new report finds more feature films were made in Georgia than any other market. In 2016, our film production even outpaced Hollywood. We discuss the film boom with AJC Buzz Blog writer Jennifer Brett, and Craig Miller of Craig Miller Productions in Atlanta.

mdghty / Foter

The Braves — The Gwinnett Braves, that is — are changing their name. And they want your submissions for name ideas. We discuss what’s behind the rebranding, and how it’s supposed to help the minor league team grow its fan base, with Sunny Mehta, Director of Clyde Group Sports; and Joel Feldman, an Atlanta-based attorney who focuses on sports branding.

Gregg Allman

We celebrate the life and legacy of Georgia singer and songwriter Gregg Allman, who died over the weekend. Allman revolutionized rock and roll in the South. He spoke with "On Second Thought" host Celeste Headlee in 2015 shortly before he was inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame. Allman explained how he got his start singing with The Allman Brothers Band and what Macon means to him. He also revealed the origins of the song “Melissa,” and he took a stand for artists who struggle to make a living.

Freddy Cole

At this weekend’s Atlanta Jazz Festival, singer Freddy Cole takes the stage. Cole is the younger brother of jazz great Nat King Cole. Freddy released an album last year called "He  Was  The King,"  a tribute to his brother, Nat. We talked with Freddy about his storied career, and his brother’s legacy. 

Marcus Williams

Marvel’s "Black Panther" wrapped shooting last month in Atlanta. It’s just one example of a welcome change we’re seeing in comic books: the rise of black superheroes. Two Atlanta-based authors are adding to the stack with, “Tuskegee Heirs: Flames of Destiny.” The comic series weaves African-American history with an epic mission to save the planet.

Little Tybee

The band Little Tybee first came together in Atlanta in 2009. The group blends folksy lyrics with intricate musical arrangements. Their fourth album came out last summer and the band gave us a live music preview from the GPB Performance Studio. 

Little Tybee will perform this Saturday at the Atlanta Jazz Festival in Piedmont Park.

 

The history of Southern food is as rich as its flavors. Whether it's red beans and rice, fried chicken, biscuits or potlikker, the history of our region’s fare stretches far and wide – from slave plantations, to the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and into our kitchens today. 

John Amis / AP Photo

The first charter school in the United States opened up 25 years ago this fall. Since then, the idea of school choice has taken off. Charter schools can give students in struggling public schools more options, but only if those students apply to charter schools and get accepted. We’ll hear about how lotteries could address this in a feature from GPB’s Grant Blankenship.

Controversy has enveloped a recent column published by the Athens Banner-Herald. In the piece, titled “Radical Left Should Be Eradicated,” Robert Ringer writes: “As with ISIS, merely containing the Radical Left is not an acceptable alternative.

Michael Lionstar

“The Nix” is the debut novel by author Nathan Hill. It revolves around Samuel Andresen-Anderson, who finds a self-promoting reason to reunite with his mother after being abandoned as a child. She’s been accused of an unusual crime and Samuel gets hired to write a story. We talk with Nathan Hill ahead of an appearance at the Margaret Mitchell House on Monday night, May 22.

David Goldman / AP Photo

Earlier this month, the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law sued Georgia to extend voter registration in the congressional race for the 6th District. The group successfully extended the deadline, but now they want to permanently change Georgia law to reflect federal law. We talk about the controversy with Chris Joyner of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s Watchdog column and Julie Houk with LCCRUL.

Whitney Chirdon / GPB

The Breakroom gang weighs in on the latest revelations about the White House and the quick fix of I-85. Then, we discuss the ongoing Uber vs. taxi debate, whether social media is healthy, and the return of "Roseanne." The Breakroom this week includes Kathy Lohr, HB Cho, Jessica Szilagyi and Robbie Medwed.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Since President Trump reached his 100th day in office, a whirlwind of stories about Trump have dominated the headlines. Georgia voters are paying especially close attention as a special election approaches in the state’s 6th Congressional District.

drpavloff / Foter

In recent weeks, conservative voices have generated controversy over speaking appearances at colleges. Betsy DeVos, Ann Coulter and Richard Spencer have all sparked protests. We ask leaders at Georgia schools how they’re preparing to balance free speech and safety issues. Oglethorpe University President Lawrence Schall joins us with Agnes Scott College Associate Vice President Kijua Sanders-McMurtry.

Courtesy of Chuck Klosterman

Writer Chuck Klosterman has met a lot of interesting people. He’s interviewed famous film actors and rock stars for Esquire, ESPN, and the New York Times Magazine. A new collection of his writing is called “Chuck Klosterman X: A Highly Specific, Defiantly Incomplete History of the Early 21st Century.” Chuck joins us ahead of an appearance in Atlanta next Monday, May 22.

John Davisson/Invision / AP Photo

Georgia lost a music legend earlier this month. Colonel Bruce Hampton died May 1, shortly after his 70th  birthday celebration at the Fox Theatre in Atlanta. Hampton was widely regarded as the granddaddy of the jam-band scene. He played with pioneering acts like the The Hampton Grease Band and Aquarium Rescue Unit. We pay homage to the great Colonel Bruce with memories from Oteil Burbridge, Jeff Sipe, and Jesse Jarnow.

Hey, Let's Read!

May 17, 2017
Ilustrated by Dian Wang

How do children’s books represent people of color? Authors and educators have organized a festival to raise awareness and celebrate books where children of color are heroes and heroines. “Hey, Let’s Read” is happening in Atlanta on May 20. We spoke with author  Patrice McLaurin and KaCey Venning, executive director of the “Hey Let’s Read" event.

Coast Guard News / Foter

A new study from Georgia Tech takes a deep look into the consequences of the National Football League draft. Over the last decade, the NFL draft has become a spectacle for viewers and fans. But as the pool increases, the average player’s career length is decreasing. The draft has also become a point of strategy, one that can set a team up for a season of success, or failure. We talk with Georgia Tech professor John Stasko, and GPB Sports Correspondent Jon Nelson.

Landmark Decision in LGBT Workers' Rights Case

May 16, 2017

For the first time, a federal court has ruled workers can’t be fired for their sexual orientation. A court in Chicago recently extended workplace protections in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to the LGBT community.  A similar case in Georgia is up for appeal. We talk with a lawyer for both cases, Greg Nevins, and with Andrea Young, director of the ACLU of Georgia.

Georgia Department of Corrections

The State Board of Pardons and Paroles has declined to commute the death sentence of J.W. Ledford. His execution is scheduled to be carried out Tuesday, May 16. It will be the first one this year. Georgia has long played a central role in the death penalty debate.

The Breakroom returns to discuss the news of the week. Our panel  includes Atlanta-based author Nicki Salcedo; Christian Zsilavetz, Executive Director of Pride School Atlanta; Natalie Pawelski of Cater Communications; and veteran Jon Jackson, who runs a farm in Milledgeville.

JOSEPH SHAPIRO / NPR

In Georgia, county courts have contracted with private probation companies to collect fines from offenders. People are sometimes jailed for not being able to pay, even though the Supreme Court outlawed debtors’ prisons some 35 years ago. In the last couple of years, Georgia law changes made it harder for private probation companies to operate. What happens now to people who don’t pay the fines?

Mikhail Chekmezov / Flickr

Empathy is a crucial human ability. It’s the basis of the golden rule: do unto others as you’d have them do unto you. And yet, empathy is not all that well understood. Many people confuse empathy with sympathy, and they are not the same. Since this is a term that’s often used, but generally misunderstood, we break it down for you.

Alan Rhew

When we think of Southern Gothic, a lot of names come to mind: Flannery O’Connor, William Faulkner, Cormac McCarthy. Critics include North Carolina-based author David Joy in that category. His new novel, "The Weight of this World," takes us into a gritty, seamy world in rural Appalachia. Characters are tormented by their own demons, roused by painful memories of a small town and memories of war.

Phil Provencio / flickr

Some comedians let nothing keep them from the stage. Ali Wong was in her third trimester when she performed for her Netflix comedy special, “Baby Cobra.” We talked with Ali Wong ahead of her performance at The Tabernacle in Atlanta on Friday, May 12.

Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press

The stocks of the two biggest private prison companies in the nation saw a big boost shortly after President Trump took office. One of those companies is the GEO Group, which currently operates detention facilities in Georgia.

Penguin Random House

Heck, everyone loves tacos -- or so says the new children’s book, “Dragons Love Tacos Two.” In this sequel, the unthinkable occurs: every taco in the world disappears. And it’s up to dragons -- the biggest taco fans -- to remedy this catastrophe and save the tacos. We hear from the duo behind the book series: writer Adam Rubin and illustrator Daniel Salmieri.

Growing Up Asian-American In The South

May 10, 2017
Matthew Hashiguchi

Asian-Americans are America’s fastest growing ethnic group. Many Asians and Pacific Islanders are settling in Georgia. But in filmmaker Matthew Hashiguchi’s experience, people don't always welcome them to the South. We talked with him about his documentary, "Good Luck Soup," which is airing on ​GPB’s Knowledge channel Sunday, May 14 at 5 p.m.

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