Celeste Headlee

Host & Exceutive Producer - On Second Thought

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist who hosts GPB Radio’s “On Second Thought,” weekdays from 9 – 10 a.m. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

Steve Helber / The Associated Press

Rallies in Charlottesville over the weekend brought together many factions of the white supremacist movement, and put a younger generation of white supremacists in the spotlight. Reporter A.C. Thompson has been tracking hate groups for ProPublica’s “Documenting Hate” project.

Music for American films is produced almost entirely in New York or Los Angeles. But as the film industry booms in Georgia, the demand for locally sourced musicians is growing. The newly formed Peach State Orchestra looks to meet that demand by becoming the first premiere movie scoring orchestra in Georgia. We talk with founder and conductor Phillip Allen.

“Shadow Of The Lions” is the debut novel of Atlanta author Christopher Swann. His thriller novel explores the life of a young man named Matthias as he reckons with the disappearance of a close friend. Christopher Swann is an English Professor at Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School, and our guest.

Chris Swann will appear at the Atlanta History Center on Thursday, August 17 at 7 p.m.

The Atlanta Dream

The WNBA’s Atlanta Dream has had a surprising season. The team lost to the New York Liberty on Friday, for its sixth straight loss, and the team is currently in ninth place in the league. But there is still enough time to make the playoffs. And in many ways, the Dream has exceeded many people’s expectations since it lost a star player for the summer.

Atlanta Falcons

A new report finds chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in 110 of 111 brains of deceased former NFL players. The study adds to a  growing body of knowledge about the connection between contact sports and brain-damaging concussions.

First, a new report finds chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in 110 of 111 brains of deceased former NFL players. The study adds to a  growing body of knowledge about the connection between contact sports and brain-damaging concussions. We talk with Steve Broglio, Director of the NeuroTrauma Research Laboratory at the University of Michigan.

We also talk with former Atlanta Falcons linebacker Buddy Curry, who is working to improve football education with his group, “Kids & Pros.”

First, when Donald Trump began his campaign in 2015, few thought he would climb to the nation’s highest office. But Jared Yates Sexton realized Trump was onto something. He was one of the first people to attend and report on Trump rallies. Sexton teaches creative writing at Georgia Southern University, and has a new book: “The People Are Going To Rise Like The Waters Upon Your Shore.” He joins us for an hour exploring changes in the American psyche.

When Donald Trump began his campaign in 2015, few thought he would climb to the nation’s highest office. But Jared Yates Sexton realized Trump was onto something. He was one of the first people to attend and report on Trump rallies. Sexton teaches creative writing at Georgia Southern University, and has a new book: “The People Are Going To Rise Like The Waters Upon Your Shore.” He joins us to explore the changes in the American psyche leading up to Trump.

Alik Keplicz / AP Photo

Donald Trump’s politics have often been described as “populist.” Populism, by definition, is the belief that average people should have more say in governance than the wealthy elite. But the term can be as misleading; Bernie Sanders was also called a populist. Since the word can cause some confusion, we break it down. Then we’re joined by a populism expert: Cas Mudde, a professor in the Department of International Affairs at the University of Georgia. And Jared Yates Sexton, a professor at Georgia Southern University.

Steve Helber / AP Photo

Since the November election, the political drama in America has only heightened. Carol Anderson is a professor of African-American Studies at Emory University. Her latest book, “White Rage,” points to racial tensions as a cause of growing division. We assemble a panel to discuss what has changed since Trump took office, and how Americans are shifting their views. Also with us is Bret Stephens, conservative columnist for the New York Times. And Jared Yates Sexton, author and a professor of writing at Georgia Southern University.

Casino Regina / flickr

If you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on "Whose Line Is It Anyway?," a popular short-form improvisational comedy show. Mochrie has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. Audiences in Atlanta can see him live on Aug. 11-12 at Dad’s Garage in Atlanta. We talked with him about his craft.

In the Breakroom this week we’ll talk about microchips, atheists, and disgruntled Google employees. Plus, we’ll discuss the ethics of getting an A for effort. Joining us this week: Kathy Lohr, Christian Zsilavetz, Amy Condon, and Steve Brown.

First, if you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on TV’s “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” and he has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. Audiences in Atlanta can see him live Friday, August 11, and tomorrow August 12 at Dad’s Garage. We talk with Colin Mochrie.

First, imagine being in outer space with two sassy robots, and being forced to watch really bad science fiction movies with them. That’s the premise of the cult classic TV series, Mystery Science Theater 3000. The show is on the road this weekend [August 12] in Atlanta. We talk with series creator, Joel Hodgson.

American University

It’s been three years since 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot dead by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri. The chaos in Ferguson brought to light deeper and disturbing issues involved in policing African Americans. American University Law Professor Angela Davis has edited an anthology of essays about black men and boys who have died at the hands of police.

David McClister

Country artist Lucinda Williams first achieved commercial breakthrough with her 1998 album, “Car Wheels on a Gravel Road.” She’s won three Grammy Awards, and was named one of the greatest country artists of all time by Rolling Stone magazine this year. Now, she’s on tour promoting her 12th studio album, “The Ghosts of Highway 20,” which reflects on her time living in Georgia. 

Courtesy of the artist

Singer Judy Collins has been making music in many genres for six decades. She’s in Atlanta on Wednesday night for a performance at Atlanta Symphony Hall. She tells us about her creative process, working on duets, and her feelings about song competitions.

 

David Goldman / AP Photo

A recent study by the non-profit Prosperity Now finds white-owned businesses make, on average, nearly ten times as much as African-American-owned businesses in the South. It also shows black business owners have a harder time finding mentorship and capital. We discuss with Dr. Dennis Kimbro, Professor of Business at Clark Atlanta University.

Sportsgrid

The Savannah Bananas are back in the playoffs this week. This comes after Savannah’s collegiate team broke the league record for attendance, again. We talk with team president, Jared Orton. Then, we hear from some number one fans. 

The Savannah Bananas are back in the playoffs this week. This comes after Savannah’s collegiate team broke the league record for attendance, again. We talk with team president, Jared Orton. Then, we hear from some number one fans.

The personal finance site Nerd Wallet says Atlanta is the nation’s best place for African-American-owned businesses. Savannah and Columbus scored high marks as well. We spoke with Cindy Yang from NerdWallet.

Today [August 7] marks 50 years since Jackson County DA Floyd Hoard was murdered. He was one of the first government prosecutors murdered in the line of the duty in the United States. The event changed the course of law enforcement and politics in Jackson County and led to then-Governor Maddox giving the Georgia Bureau of Investigation jurisdiction in Jackson County.

Wikimedia Commons

Blue Cross Blue Shield is currently the only insurer on Georgia’s statewide exchange, and its premiums are set to go up as much as 40 percent by 2018. The insurer just announced a new policy limiting consumer coverage when it comes to emergency room visits. We talk with Andy Miller, editor of Georgia Health News, and Beth Stephens, Senior Director of Public Policy, Georgia Watch.

First, August 7th marks 50 years since Jackson County DA Floyd Hoard was murdered. He was one of the first government prosecutors murdered in the line of the duty in the United States. The event changed the course of law enforcement and politics in Jackson County and led to then-Governor Maddox giving the Georgia Bureau of Investigation jurisdiction in Jackson County. Floyd Hoard's son, Richard Hoard, wrote a book about his father's murder a few years ago.

krnjn / Foter

The average cost of college tuition has jumped by 77 percent over the last 10 years. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is collaborating with The Hechinger Report in New York to determine the consequences of rising student debt. The first in a series of investigative articles rolled out on Sunday. We talk to Meredith Kolodner, Staff Writer for The Hechinger Report.

In the Breakroom this week we talk about tuna salad, blocking people on Twitter, and the science of manspreading. Plus, we say our goodbyes to The Mooch. Joining us this week: Tomika DePriest, Greg Williams, Hector Fernandez, and Soumaya Khalifa.

First, the average cost of college tuition has jumped by 77 percent over the last 10 years. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is collaborating with The Hechinger Report in New York to determine the consequences of rising student debt. The first in a series of investigative articles will roll out this Sunday. We talk to Meredith Kolodner, Staff Writer for The Hechinger Report.

Courtesy of Wayne Kramer

Wayne Kramer co-founded the Detroit band Motor City Five back in 1967. The group, better known as MC5, ultimately disbanded in 1973. But Wayne continued playing and has remained a politically vocal artist. He’ll be in Georgia this weekend performing at CBGB Athens, a benefit for homeless veterans in the state. All proceeds from that show will also go to homeless veterans.

First, as natural predators of insects, bats are extremely important to agriculture. Researchers estimate their value to farmers in the U.S. is roughly $23 billion per year, but these are tough times for bats. A malignant fungus known as "white-nose syndrome" has killed a lot of bats over the past 10 years. We talk about this menace with wildlife pathologist Heather Fenton of the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study and Georgia State University microbiologist Chris Cornelison.

Kevin O'Mara / Flickr

Five rural hospitals closed their doors between 2013 and 2016, and many more face potential financial collapse. One effort to help curb the problem of rural health care access is the Two Georgias initiative. That program is a collaboration between healthcare providers across the state, designed to expand access to quality health care in rural parts of Georgia.

Antrell Williams / Foter

Georgia led the nation with the highest increase in personal auto insurance rates in 2016, according to a new analysis from S&P Global Market Intelligence. Though Georgia has held a top spot in insurance rate boosts over the years, outgoing Insurance Commissioner Ralph Hudgens has said he does not plan to take action.

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