Celeste Headlee

Host & Exceutive Producer of "On Second Thought"

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist who hosts GPB Radio’s “On Second Thought,” weekdays from 9 – 10 a.m. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

It’s no secret young kids’ parents don’t get a lot of sleep. But new research shows living with children means less sleep for women than it does for men. Georgia Southern University assistant professor of epidemiology Kelly Sullivan is the author of this study. She joins us from our Savannah studio.

Gary Waters / Getty Images

No human being is free of bias, but we’re mostly unaware of them. Politicians aren’t, though, and they use our unconscious biases to convince us that what’s true is false and vice versa. Appealing to emotions, rather than reason, can be a very persuasive strategy. We talked about this tactic with Kennesaw State psychology professor Roxanne Donovan and Penn State media studies professor Shyam Sundar.

Over 15 million people in the United States deal with social anxiety disorder. SAD is an extreme fear  of being scrutinized and judged in social situations. For people who deal with social anxiety, it can be a paralyzing part of their everyday life. Georgia State psychology professor Page Anderson has developed a new technology to help people with social anxiety by using virtual reality. Her technology simulates real life settings and helps patients treat their anxiety virtually before confronting real-world situations.

Last week’s cold snap means bad news for fruit farmers in northern Georgia. The peach and blueberry industry will potentially lose millions of dollars to the late freeze. Some researchers at the University of Georgia have developed an equation which they say will help combat that loss. Joining us is one of those researchers--Pam Knox, an Agricultural Climatologist at the University of Georgia. Also joining us by phone is Joe Cornelius, Chair of the Georgia Blueberry Commission.

j_v_tran / Foter

Last week’s cold snap means bad news for fruit farmers in northern Georgia. The peach and blueberry industry will potentially lose millions of dollars to the late freeze. Some researchers at the University of Georgia have developed an equation which they say will help combat that loss.

Joining us is one of those researchers--Pam Knox, an Agricultural Climatologist at the University of Georgia. Also joining us by phone is Joe Cornelius, Chair of the Georgia Blueberry Commission.

Jim Gathany / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The museum at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention features a collection of photos by Jim Gathany. The exhibit is called “A Lens on CDC,” and it runs until the end of May. For 30 years, Gathany has documented the center’s scientific breakthroughs, its facilities, and its history. We talked with Gathany about his experience behind the lens at the CDC. 

The FBI is investigating an alleged breach of voter data at Kennesaw State University. State officials learned earlier this month that more than seven million voter records from the KSU Center for Elections Systems may have been compromised. The University has made an initial statement, but no other comments have been made. With us to discuss this is Kristina Torres, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Congress of local and regional authorities / Foter

The FBI is investigating an alleged breach of voter data at Kennesaw State University. State officials learned earlier this month that more than seven million voter records from the KSU Center for Elections Systems may have been compromised. 

With us to discuss this is Kristina Torres, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Andre Johnson Photography

Rachael Shaner is the frontwoman for Savannah band Lulu The Giant. They performed live on our show last week during a broadcast from the Stopover Music Festival. Rachael gives us her two picks for the essential Georgia Playlist.

Lulu The Giant performs at Smith's Olde Bar on April 1 at 8 p.m.

Olivia Reingold / GPB

The Breakroom returns with no shortage of news to discuss. We’ll talk about Snoop Dogg’s controversial new music video, and think about why the new "Beauty and the Beast" film is so upsetting to some people. Then, we’ll discuss whether Georgia should be encouraging coyote hunting, and look back at the viral video of a family exposed on a live BBC interview. 

The Breakroom panel today is:

Georgia American Revolution Preservation Alliance

More than 200 years ago, the British Army made its first push into the American South. The Georgian Continental Army lost to the British during the American Revolution at Brier Creek. Today, another battle is being waged over threats to the preservation of this historic 500-acre site.

pexels

A new study says there are dangerous chemicals that we should avoid in many cosmetic products, particularly those marketed to black women. We learned more about the evolution of these products and the dangers they may pose.

As the race to fill Tom Price’s 6th District Congressional seat heats up, Democrats hope all that activity translates to votes in the special election next month. Jon Ossoff, 30, is encouraging Democrats with his “Make Trump Furious” campaign, and raising a considerable amount of grassroots support. We learn more about Ossoff’s campaign and the race ahead with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Greg Bluestein and University of Georgia professor Audrey Haynes.

Brandon Anderson / flickr

Unsolved murders can become cold cases, and leave more questions than answers. That’s where the Murder Accountability Project (MAP) comes into the picture. The group sifts through large amounts of homicide data to find crime patterns and predict possible outcomes.

Jon Ossoff

As the race to fill Tom Price’s 6th District Congressional seat heats up, Democrats hope all that activity translates to votes in the special election next month. Jon Ossoff, 30, is encouraging Democrats with his “Make Trump Furious” campaign, and raising a considerable amount of grassroots support. We learned more about Ossoff’s campaign and the race ahead with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Greg Bluestein and University of Georgia professor Audrey Haynes.

It’s nearly spring. That means plants will begin to peek out of the soil again, insects return in force, and you might start to see more critters wandering around. On this show, we focus on Georgia’s wildlife from the bushy tailed variety that climb our trees, to the ancient shelled kind that swim off our shores.

Alan Rhew

When we think of Southern Gothic, a lot of names come to mind: Flannery O’Connor, William Faulkner, Cormac McCarthy. Critics include North Carolina-based author David Joy in that category. His new novel, "The Weight of this World," takes us into a gritty, seamy world in rural Appalachia. Characters are tormented by their own demons, roused by painful memories of a small town and memories of war.

Olivia Reingold / On Second Thought

We talked with Pulitzer Prize-nominated journalist Robert Coram, who is used to writing about other people’s lives. He’s written a number of biographies, but his new book focuses on his own life. It is called "Gully Dirt: On Exposing the Klan, Raising a Hog, and Escaping the South."

 

 

Design Feast / Foter

Personal finance site WalletHub conducted a recent study rating the healthiest and unhealthiest cities in the country. According to the study, Augusta, Georgia is one of the unhealthiest cities in the nation. This is based on a  number of factors, like the cost of a doctor visit, fruit and vegetable consumption, and fitness clubs per capita.

Personal finance site WalletHub conducted a recent study rating the healthiest and unhealthiest cities in the country. According to the study, Augusta, Georgia is one of the unhealthiest cities in the nation. This is based on a number of factors, like the cost of a doctor visit, fruit and vegetable consumption, and fitness clubs per capita.

Disney

The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes Jessica Leigh Lebos of Connect Savannah, Amy Condon of Savannah Magazine, Steve Brown of the Fayette County Board of Commissioners, and Milledgeville farmer Jon Jackson.

 BREAKROOM TOPICS:

Cindy Hill / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Our in-house musician for the Friday broadcast of our live show from Savannah was Christopher Paul Stelling. He is performing at the Savannah Stopover Music Festival. Stelling is originally from Daytona Beach, Florida, but is now based in North Carolina. His debut album, “Songs of Praise and Scorn,” was released in 2012. Since then, he’s released two more records, and was invited to perform at NPR Music for a Tiny Desk Concert.

geoff_in_dubai / flickr

The port of Savannah leads the nation in exports of shark fins. The legal, but controversial commodity is used for shark fin soup, popular in parts of Asia. We talked about this with Mary Landers, reporter for Savannah Morning News.

This is a live broadcast from Savannah for the Stopover Music Festival.

We start off the show with a conversation about shark fins. The port of Savannah leads the nation in exports of these fins. The legal, but controversial commodity is used for shark fin soup, popular in parts of Asia. We talked about this with Mary Landers, reporter for Savannah Morning News. We also spoke with Lora Snyder, the Shark Campaign Director for the nonprofit group Oceana.

Go back almost 110 years, and you couldn’t find a place in Savannah that was legally serving alcohol. Georgia went dry the first day of 1908, and stayed that way more than 25 years, until Prohibition was repealed. A museum in Savannah opening next month tells the Prohibition story from the first drop to the last. We got a preview from the museum’s manager, Kayla Black.

 

A group of artists are coming together in Savannah to champion women’s rights. "The Personal is Political" is a new exhibit which explores “the relationship between personal experience and the political structures we navigate in our daily lives.” Art Rise Savannah and Planned Parenthood Southeast are teaming up for this exhibition, which opens Friday at the Art Rise Gallery. We talked about it with Heather McRae, exhibitions director at Art Rise Savannah. We also talked with Niki Johnson, whose work is featured in the exhibit.

Savannah Stopover Music Festival

The Savannah Stopover Music Festival has been going strong now for seven years. More than 80 bands will perform this weekend, including musicians Kishi Bashi and Julien Baker. Kayne Lanahan is the founder and organizer of the festival. We spoke with her about the festival and what she’s excited to see and hear this weekend.

We did a live show from The Grey restaurant in Savannah, Georgia for the Savannah Stopover Music Festival.

 

 

The Stopover Music Festival has been going strong now for seven years. More than 80 bands will perform this weekend, including musicians Kishi Bashi and Julien Baker. Kayne Lanahan is the founder and organizer of the festival. We spoke with her about the festival and what she’s excited to see and hear this weekend.

Georgia singer Jamie Barton is a rising star in the opera world. She’s only 35 but her voice has filled concert halls all over the world. In 2015, she nabbed the prestigious Richard Tucker Award. It’s a $50,000 prize sometimes called the "Heisman Trophy" of Music. But Barton hails from a place not often associated with grand opera--Rome, Georgia. We revisit a conversation with Jamie about finding a passion for opera in an unusual setting.

March is Women’s History Month, but this year doesn’t bring a lot of good news for women in Georgia. A new study found Georgia is the sixth worst state in the nation for females based on a number of factors, including wages, health care, dropout rates and life expectancy. On this show, we focus on some issues that affect the women in the state.

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