Celeste Headlee

Host & Exceutive Producer - On Second Thought

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist who hosts GPB Radio’s “On Second Thought,” weekdays from 9 – 10 a.m. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

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Rapper Killer Mike started out as Michael Render from southwest Atlanta's Adamsville neighborhood. As a solo artist and in his work with Run The Jewels, his lyrics often address issues related to social injustice. Lately, Killer Mike has been a familiar face on the campaign trail in support of Senator Bernie Sanders for President. He talks with us about his music, the presidential race, and his own political future.

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Atlanta rapper Killer Mike is determined to see Bernie Sanders in the White House. We talk with him about the presidential race, the Black Lives Matter Movement, and his music.

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Francine Bryson is a self-proclaimed "redneck."  She's also a championship baker who watched her mother and grandmothers whip up Southern suppers in the kitchen every Sunday. Bryson takes those classic recipes and makes them her own in her new cookbook, "Country Cooking From A Redneck Kitchen."

Nationally, about 60% of immigrants forced to go to immigration court win their cases and avoid deportation. In Lumpkin, Ga., thousands of immigrants go through that court each year; more than  97%  lose their cases and are deported. NPR investigative reporter Caitlin Dickerson looked at how the court operates, and shares the story of one immigrant whose fate was determined in Lumpkin. 

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When non-citizens in the U.S. are convicted of a crime, they often go through two justice systems. One is criminal court that all of us know about.  The other is immigration court.

It's the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prize. We'll spend some time with past winners who have a connection to Georgia all year long in a new series we're calling Pulitzer Peaches. You may know our first guest from his hilarious and satirical cartoons in The Atlanta-Journal Constitution

    

Alison Rosa

Georgia native and crime writer Karin Slaughter is the author of several international best-sellers. Her latest book "Pretty Girls" is about two women whose teenage sister vanished without a trace. The paperback edition of the book came out last week. 

  

We speak with Slaughter about the inspiration for the book, what makes a good thriller, and the reason why she sets her novels in Georgia.

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Last year, the Department of Justice came down hard on the Georgia school system after they learned about the segregation and isolation of disabled students into special "psycho-educational programs." But now, another investigation into these special programs has revealed that a disproportionate amount of black students are sent to these facilities. New reporting reveals that students are offered little or no psychiatric help and spend much of the day either playing games or sitting in isolation.

Last year, the Department of Justice came down hard on the Georgia school system after they learned about the segregation and isolation of disabled students into special "psychoeducational schools." But now, another investigation into these special schools has revealed that a disproportionate amount of black students are sent to these facilities. New reporting reveals that students are offered little or no psychiatric help and spend much of the day either playing games or sitting in isolation.

Judge Horace Ward of Georgia died on Saturday, April 23 at the age of 88. 

Ward graduated with honors from Morehouse College and then got a master's degree from Atlanta University. Those are both historically black institutions. When he applied to the School of Law at the University of Georgia in 1950, he was refused because of his race.  The Board of Regents offered to help him go to school in another state. But Ward insisted he wanted to study at UGA. Ward's case was thrown out seven years later and he went to Northwestern University in Illinois where he earned his law degree. 

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We’re joined by our Friday panel in The Breakroom to discuss and debate the week’s news. We talk about the University of Georgia paying Ludacris a huge amount of cash, liquor and condoms for a 15 minute performance, Beyonce’s new visual album called “Lemonade”, and how the FBI fabricated evidence that sent dozens of people to death row.  

An Atlanta artist is trying to get beyond the statistics about sexual abuse. All month long, Jessica Caldas has marked an “X” on the ground in chalk every 107 seconds. That’s how often someone is sexually abused in the U.S., according to federal data. We talk with her about the message she hopes people will take away from her art. 

Church of Scientology

Earlier this month, Georgia's first Ideal Church of Scientology opened its doors. The 45,000-square-foot mansion that houses the church is located in Sandy Springs, just outside Atlanta. We talk to a Scientologist from Atlanta about what draws him to the church, and how it has diversified.

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April is Financial Literacy Month. It was designated in 2003. The Great Recession revealed just how little average Americans know about their finances. So, in the spirit of education, we break down something we hear a lot about, especially during election time: Social Security. We also talk with Social Security expert Mary Beth Franklin, who is a contributing editor with InvestmentNews.

Synchronicity Theatre

In 2011, Georgia executed Troy Davis, a death row inmate convicted of killing a Savannah police officer. The case sparked international interest. Leaders including former President Jimmy Carter, Pope Benedict XVI, and former Georgia Congressman Bob Barr spoke out against the execution. A play at the Synchronicity Theatre in Atlanta presents both sides of the Troy Davis case.

Donald Trump’s political rallies have been anything but dull over the past few months. Supporters and protestors have attended the gatherings in large numbers and their interactions have often turned ugly. Violence at Trump-sponsored events has been frequent, including several instances of protestors being assaulted by Trump supporters. Because these events are considered private events that are hosted by Trump’s campaign, the rules inside his rallies are much stricter than many people realize.

Marcus Autism Center

One of the first signs of autism in infants is the delay of what's known as babbling. Babbling is exactly what it sounds like: indiscernible words of jumbled consonants and vowels strung together. It's adorable when babies do it, but it’s also an important stage of language development. Gordon Ramsay, a doctor at the Marcus Autism Center in Atlanta, has collected the largest database of baby babbles.

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Donald Trump’s political rallies have been anything but dull over the past few months. Supporters and protestors have attended the gatherings in large numbers and their interactions have often turned ugly. Violence at Trump-sponsored events has been frequent, including several instances of protestors being assaulted by Trump supporters. Because these gatherings are considered private events that are hosted by Trump’s campaign, the rules inside his rallies are much stricter than many people realize.

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The recovery continues following this month's devastating earthquake in Ecuador. Global relief organizations have crews on the ground to provide assistance. We talk with a relief workers from Georgia-based MAP International about how they are helping and what more there is to be done.

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The growing need for teachers in Georgia has led the Savannah-Chatham school district to rely on an often overlooked education program.  Alternative Pathways to Teaching allows anyone with a bachelor’s degree to earn a teaching certificate while serving as an interim teacher. The program has ushered in hundreds of new teachers to the Savannah school system.

MAP International

A 7.8 magnitude earthquake left hundreds dead and thousands homeless in Ecuador. Global relief organizations are on the ground there to provide assistance. One of them is Georgia-based MAP International.  We talk with MAP President and CEO Steve Stirling and Stella Losado, the group's community health specialist.

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We’re are joined by our Friday panel in The Breakroom to dissect the week’s news, including the benefits of listening to live music and the issue of corporal punishment in the Georgia school system. The Breakroom gang also discusses the  infamous pepper spray incident at UC Davis and why satirical news outlet The Onion has become so successful over the years.

Joining us in the Breakroom this week are:

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This Saturday, several white power groups will descend on Stone Mountain, Georgia to hold a joint rally. The event has garnered attention from anti-white power groups, who will also be attending the rally in protest. And in Rome,  The National Nazi Party will hold their annual meeting on the same night. The groups then plan to meet up in Paulding County where a cross burning has been advertised.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution watchdog reporter Chris Joyner joins us to discuss the two different events and whether Georgia has become a hot-bed for white nationalist groups. 

Robert Shaw: Man of Many Voices

When you talk about classical music in Atlanta, the one name you're likely to come across is Robert Shaw.  The former conductor and music director of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra was known as a "choral giant." A new documentary called “Robert Shaw: Man of Many Voices,” tells his story. Filmmaker Kiki Wilson reflects on Shaw's storied career with Nick Jones, the ASO's former program annotator.

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Ponce De Leon Avenue stands as one of Atlanta’s most culturally significant streets. It served as a line of demarcation during segregation and evolved into a hotspot for music, entertainment and contemporary religion in downtown Atlanta. VICE producer Akil Gibbons recently released the mini-documentary entitled “Streets by VICE: Atlanta.”

In the short film, Gibbons travels along the important roadway and experiences some of Atlanta’s unique culture first-hand. We talk with him about what makes Ponce special.

Canton Jones

Georgia pastor and singer Canton Jones appears on the Oxygen TV reality series, Preachers of Atlanta. Jones added two more songs to our Georgia Playlist. He chose songs by Ray Charles and Usher.

Georgia Says Goodbye To Prince

Apr 21, 2016
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The world lost one of its most influential performers this week. Prince Rogers Nelson, 57, was reported dead in his Paisley Park home in Minnesota on Thursday, April 21, 2016. The cultural icon played two evening shows at Atlanta's Fox Theatre just a week before. The audience couldn't have known they were witnesses to the the final performances of a legend.

Courtesy of Algonquin Books

Best-selling author and poet Robert Morgan draws his inspiration from the people and places he knew while growing up in the foothills of North Carolina. His latest novel "Chasing the North Star" is set after the passage of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act and follows a runaway slave on his journey north through the Appalachian Mountains to freedom.

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Motorcar mogul Henry Ford has had a tremendous impact on a little town in coastal Georgia. When Ford established his winter home in the struggling area that would become Richmond Hill, he and his wife sought to uplift the town and bring an end to the poverty that characterized the area. They brought jobs to the community, ended malaria, and provided access to healthcare for a beleaguered citizenry. 

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Georgia may not be following in the footsteps of Colorado or Washington when it comes to legalizing recreational marijuana, but local politicians in the city of Clarkston are hoping to change the way that law enforcement deals with minor possession of the drug. Mayor Ted Terry is supporting legislation that would levy fines instead of arrests when less than an ounce of the drug is involved. 

Hear Mayor Terry's thinking behind the change in Clarkston's policy and how he feels about the "War on Drugs."

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