Celeste Headlee

Host & Exceutive Producer of "On Second Thought"

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist who hosts GPB Radio’s “On Second Thought,” weekdays from 9 – 10 a.m. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

This is show is a celebration of Black History Month. Since 1970, February has been dedicated to celebrating the contributions and achievements of African-Americans. We talk about the "Bank Black" movement, some tragic history in Savannah, a daring escape from Macon, and even how to handle a controversial term in the classroom.

 

A study by Emory University found that people view the term “African-American” more favorably than “black.” We talked with Erika Hall, who worked on the study, about what this might mean for prospective job seekers.

DeeMo / Foter

Atlanta has seen a striking number of attacks by loose dogs in recent weeks. One such attack resulted in the death of a 6-year-old boy in southwest Atlanta. We talk about these events with Ellen Eldridge, a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. We also discuss how this may or may not affect the animal laws in the state with Jessica Rock, a Founding Partner at Animal Law Source.

Eric Gay / The Associated Press

Abortion rights groups are keeping a close eye on Washington as President Trump vows to see the landmark Roe v. Wade decision overturned. Last week, he announced his choice to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Abortion rights groups are keeping a close eye on Washington as President Trump vows to see the landmark Roe v. Wade decision overturned. Last week, he announced his choice to the U.S. Supreme Court. Trump has promised to only appoint “pro-life judges.” Members of Congress are also pushing legislation to restrict abortions. A bill sponsored by Georgia Congressman Jody Hice would legally define human life as beginning at conception. The bill also states that embryos are allowed the same “right to life” as human beings. We’ve explored the abortion debate before.

mathiaswasik / Foter

Under a new, conservative administration, rights for LGBT individuals and families may come under threat. We discuss the status of current state and federal rights for LGBT citizens, and look at what battles might be ahead. With us is Atlanta-based LGBT activist Robbie Medwed, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Reporter Kristina Torres, and Lila Bradley, family law attorney at Claiborne Fox Bradley LLC.

Keenan Jones / GPB

The Breakroom is back, and there’s plenty to talk about. We’ll discuss the firing of former acting Attorney General Sally Yates, and if she has a place in Georgia politics. Then, we look at stories surrounding the Atlanta Falcons, including their increased national popularity and alleged overuse of painkillers. We’ll also see if classic movie reboots are any good, and we'll put to bed the debate whether Jack could’ve survived in “Titanic."

Atlanta Falcons

On Sunday, the Atlanta Falcons meet the New England Patriots in Super Bowl LI. It will wind up as the Falcons first Super Bowl win, or the Patriots’ fifth. GPB Senior Sports correspondent Jon Nelson joined us for a preview.

New America / Foter

Doctor Tom Frieden was appointed by President Obama in 2009 to head the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Following President Trump’s inauguration two weeks ago, Frieden stepped down from the CDC. Tom Frieden joins us to talk about his work with the CDC, and what he hopes to see happen there moving forward.

Doctor Tom Frieden was appointed by President Obama in 2009 to head the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Following President Trump’s Inauguration two weeks ago, Frieden stepped down from the CDC. Tom Frieden joins us to talk about his work with the CDC, and what he hopes to see happen there moving forward.

On Sunday, the Atlanta Falcons meet the New England Patriots in Super Bowl LI. It will wind up as the Falcons first Super Bowl win, or the Patriots’ fifth. GPB Senior Sports correspondent Jon Nelson joins us for a preview.

.sanden. / Foter

New legislation has passed the Georgia Senate which would allow local breweries to sell beer directly to consumers. The bill would do away with the current need to sell beer through tour packages. We talk with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Aaron Gould Sheinin, and Andrew Lorber, brewer and co-founder of Orpheus Brewing in Atlanta.

Breweries are few and far between all along the bible belt. The Brewer’s Association found that Southern States make up the bulk of the ten states with the fewest number of craft breweries per capita--and Georgia sits right in the middle of that list. So why is the South pushing back more brewers? We talk with University of Louisville economics professor Steve Gohmann, and also Nancy Palmer of the Georgia Craft Brewer’s Guild.

University of Georgia

In a world of screens, some teachers are putting their foot down with technology in the classroom. And research suggests there may be good reason behind that decision. A recent study from MIT found college students do better on exams when they’re not allowed access to computers.

President Trump’s executive orders concerning immigrants and refugees have upset a lot of people across the country. The town of Clarkston, Georgia is home to a large refugee population. It’s been called the Ellis Island of the South. On Tuesday night, the city held a special meeting to discuss President Trump’s executive actions. We talk with Clarkston mayor Ted Terry about how the president’s orders may impact his refugee community.

Photo courtesy of Browns Mill

Last year, Atlanta chose land to be used for the city’s first Community Food Forest. The Mayor’s Office of Sustainability hopes Browns Mill Food Forest will help reduce food deserts and bring wider awareness of sustainable urban agriculture. We talk about the forest with Mario Cambardella, Urban Agriculture Director for the City of Atlanta.

 

Foter

Following the success of its first online master’s degree program, this fall Georgia Tech will offer a second online master’s degree program in analytics. The cost for the degree is less than $10,000, a new investment in the institute’s model for low-cost, online graduate education. We talk with Nelson Baker, Dean of Professional Education, about what the program hopes to achieve.

 

 

Kate T. Parker

The role of a female photographer is especially important in an age when women are often depicted in superficial or sexualized ways. Many women in the photography industry are trying to change that, including Kate Parker, whose new book, “Strong is the New Pretty,” depicts girls as unique and capable, rather than simply primped and stereotypically pretty.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

President Trump’s executive orders concerning immigrants and refugees have upset a lot of people across the country. The town of Clarkston, Georgia is home to a large refugee population. It’s been called the Ellis Island of the South. On Tuesday night, the city held a special meeting to discuss President Trump’s executive actions. We talk with Clarkston mayor Ted Terry about how the president’s orders may impact his refugee community.

This year we present a continuing series called “Georgia Eats.” We’ll bring you great conversations with farmers, chefs, cooks, scientists and even some delicious recipes you may want to try. 

The "Justin Bieber of the Southern organic crowd," that's how the New York Times described Will Harris of White Oak Pastures. It’s the largest USDA organic farm in Georgia and the only farm in the country with both beef and poultry slaughterhouses. We talked to him and Grant Gerlock of Harvest Public Media about the outlook for organic meat.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Over the weekend, federal immigration officials detained and later released 11 lawful permanent residents at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. They were returning from a trip to Iran, one of seven predominantly Muslim countries where there is now a three month ban on travel to the United States. That’s the result of an executive order signed by President Trump. We talked with Atlanta immigration attorney Sarah Owings about the impact of the order on Georgia.

The DePaulia / flickr

A class at Armstrong State University in Savannah teaches students about the music of OutKast. As part of our Lessons from Left Field series, we talk with professor Regina Bradley and two of her students: Anthony Scott and Gabby Nichols.

 

Over the weekend, federal immigration officials detained and later released four lawful permanent residents at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. They were returning from a trip in Iran, one of seven predominantly Muslim countries where there’s a three month ban on travel to the United States. That’s the result of an executive order signed by President Trump. We talk with Atlanta immigration attorney Sarah Owings, who is representing the families of those who were detained.

Photo Courtesy of Taylor Brown

"Fallen Land," a recent novel by writer and Georgia native Taylor Brown, depicts a couple fleeing a band of marauders in the final year of the Civil War. The book has been named one of Southern Living’s Best Books of 2016. Brown joins us to talk about his fiction and how it ties in to Georgia history.

Lisa Brewster / Foter

Casino gambling legislation was introduced in both the State House and Senate last week. Sponsors say they will provide jobs and bring tax revenue to local governments. Opponents say the casinos will bring crime and other issues. To discuss these concerns, we talk with Allan Vella, CEO of the Fox Theatre in Atlanta.

Keenan Jones / On Second Thought

The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes Georgia State University professor Eric Segall, writer and blogger Jessica SzilagyiNatalie Pawelski of Cater Communications, and Emory University professor Falguni Sheth.

 

Thomas Hawk / Foter

A recent lawsuit by dancers at the Cheetah nightclub in Atlanta alleges multiple women were subject to sexual misconduct behind closed doors. Physical abuse, groping, and even rape were among the claims of the dancers. The strip club vehemently denies any such allegations. We talk to Atlanta Journal-Constitution columnist Chris Joyner about how this lawsuit challenges the status quo of the industry.

A recent lawsuit by dancers at the Cheetah nightclub in Atlanta alleges multiple women were subject to sexual misconduct behind closed doors. Physical abuse, groping, and even rape were among the claims of the dancers. The strip club denies such allegations. We talk to AJC columnist Chris Joyner about how this lawsuit challenges the status quo of the industry.

The recent documentary series “Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise” examines how social justice activism has evolved since the assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. The series is narrated by Harvard University historian Henry Louis Gates Jr. 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Storms in South Georgia have devastated the communities there in the last few days. Since the storms began this past weekend, at least 15 people have been killed and dozens more injured.

 

 

GPB’s Grant Blankenship was in Albany earlier this week, covering the scene there. He joins us to provide an update on the damage.

The Blue Seas Restaurant is the result of efforts to bring people of different stripes together in west Atlanta. In a neighborhood left in the shadow of a new Falcons stadium, community leaders have built a place for communion, growth, unity, and healthy food. We talk to two of the spiritual leaders behind the restaurant, and ask what they believe this establishment can achieve.

A&E

Last month, the A&E Network canceled a documentary series about the Ku Klux Klan. The series, which featured Klan members in North Georgia, was scrapped because some of the people interviewed were paid to appear in it.

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