Celeste Headlee

Special Correspondent

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist and special correspondent for GPB. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

University of South Carolina Press

Fifty years ago, babies in the U.S. were three times more likely to die before reaching a first birthday. And the problems driving infant and maternal mortality were even worse in rural areas. Diane Cantor set out to be part of a change. She left college in the early 1970s to work for a federal program providing prenatal care to women in North Georgia. Her experiences inspired a novel called “When Nighttime Shadows Fall.” Diane Cantor lives in Savannah.

Reid Williams / GPB

The Breakroom gang is back to discuss the recent government shutdown, the addictiveness of Facebook, and why some people don’t trust the government. We’ll also say goodbye to Elton John on stage, debate whether it’s time for kids to pay rent, and decide if Trump-bashing is counterproductive. Joining us this week are Hector Fernandez, Falguni Sheth, Greg Williams, and Natalie Pawelski.

Fifty years ago, babies in the U.S. were three times more likely to die before reaching a first birthday. And the problems driving infant and maternal mortality were even worse in rural areas. Diane Cantor set out to be part of a change. She left college in the early 1970s to work for a federal program providing prenatal care to women in North Georgia. Her experiences inspired a novel called “When Nighttime Shadows Fall.” Diane Cantor lives in Savannah. We talk to her ahead of an appearance on January 30 at A Cappella Books in Atlanta.

Astralytical

A report on Camden County’s bid for a spaceport came out a few months ago. Laura Forczyk is an author of it, and the owner of Astralytical. The Atlanta-based consulting firm is working for Camden County on developing its plans for a launch site and space education center, which supporters say will bolster the economy.

Wikimedia Commons / From Riverside Natural History, by permission of Houghton, Mifflin & Co.

Cumberland Island is 14 miles of beaches, forests and marshes. Ecologist Carol Ruckdeschel has lived among the plants and animals there for 45 years. Her observations are presented in a recently published book: “A Natural History of Cumberland Island Georgia.”

Southern rock band Drive-by Truckers was co-founded by friends Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley in 1996.  They still call Athens home, and they're planning a series of shows next month at the 40 Watt. We talk with Hood about the group’s latest record “American Band,” and his role as a musician in a politically tumultuous time.

Getting the flu is at best unpleasant. At worst, it can kill you.  Seven more Georgians died from the flu this month, bringing this season’s statewide death toll to twelve. And many more people end up in the hospital. The term flu shot is heard and used all the time, but not well understood. We broke it down with Emory University professor Robert Bednarczyk.

 

The Associated Press

A documentary showing at the Atlanta Jewish Film Festival tells the story of singer and dancer Sammy Davis, Jr. The film is called “Sammy Davis, Jr.: I’ve Gotta Be Me.” Davis wore many hats: World War II veteran, Civil Rights activist, and singer/dancer member of the fabled Rat Pack.  

The Associated Press

Last week, the Coca-Cola Company unveiled an ambitious plan to recycle a bottle or can for every drink it sells by 2030. It is the latest move by the Atlanta-based soda giant to address environmental concerns tied to its production. Will this plan work?

Maura Currie / GPB

This past weekend marked one year since President Trump’s inauguration. It was also the first anniversary of the record-breaking Women’s March. The 2017 march likely included more than 3 million people. That’s about one-and-a-half percent of the entire US population. This weekend’s marches saw more than a million people participate, and organizers are working to broaden the movement's scope and inclusivity.

 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Many Georgia neighborhoods are stranded in food deserts, where fresh edibles are few and far between. One potential remedy is urban farming. Across the state, farmers and community leaders grow food in the neighborhoods that need it most. And it’s getting easier than ever to start growing if you want to make a difference.

Last week, the Coca-Cola Company unveiled an ambitious plan to recycle a bottle or can for every drink it sells. It’s the latest move by the Atlanta-based soda giant to address environmental concerns tied to its production. Will this plan work? We talk with environmental historian Bart Elmore, author of the book, “Citizen Coke: The Making of Coca-Cola Capitalism.”

GPB News / Emily Cureton

Georgia’s film industry supports many actors, producers, directors...and also classical musicians. Like Tracy Woodard. She’s a violinist in Atlanta. And on any given day, you might catch her recording soundtracks for a new TV show, film, or video game. She’s also founder of an event series where contemporary composers present new scores for very old, silent movies. Tracy talked to us about writing music for movies, and where composers experiment.

WALLY GOBETZ / FLICKR

The ongoing Atlanta bribery scandal brought a sentencing last week. Adam Smith, former chief procurement officer for Atlanta, got more than two years in jail. We talked about the bribery scandal with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Scott Trubey.

The ongoing Atlanta bribery scandal brought a sentencing last week. Adam Smith, former chief procurement officer for Atlanta, got more than two years in jail. Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Scott Trubey has been following the bribery scandal, and he joins us in the studio.

ermakov / Foter

Nearly 1,000 students at Georgia State University date older people to help pay the costs of tuition, rent, and other expenses. Most students use a website called SeekingArrangement.com to find and hook-up with often older, wealthier men. 

This week marks the 157th anniversary of Georgia’s decision to secede from the union. By 1861, eleven states had left the United States to form the Confederacy. The new nation lasted four years before its defeat in 1865. But the dream of secession is still very much alive. We talk about this with Trey Hood, Political Science Professor at the University of Georgia. And Roxanne Donovan, Psychology Professor at Kennesaw State University.

 

 

 

Reid Williams / On Second Thought

The Breakroom gang joined host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. The panel included podcast host Kalena Boller, former NPR correspondent Kathy Lohr, Korea Daily reporter HB Cho, and Fayette County Commissioner Steve Brown.

For years, Atlanta has worked to fix failing public schools. Charter schools have begun to appear as an alternative to many of those troubled schools. In author David Osborne’s latest book, Reinventing America’s Schools, he suggests charter school-like guidelines that all schools should follow, including Atlanta’s. We talked with him and Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Maureen Downey.

 

 

Georgia’s Girl Scouts recently joined the debate over a Savannah bridge name. As it stands, Talmadge Memorial Bridge honors a segregationist. The Girl Scouts would like the bridge renamed in honor of their founder and Savannah native, Juliette Gordon Low. Today marks 91 years since Low’s death. We talk about her life with Girl Scouts historian Jami Brantley. She manages the Girl Scout First Headquarters Museum in Savannah.

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