Emily Cureton

Reporter

Emily Cureton is a reporter for GPB News.  Her background includes producing and hosting public radio, newspaper reporting and studying foreign languages. She's lived in New York, Texas, California and Oregon; spent time in Russia, and road-tripped through Mexico and Central America. She might help you finish that crossword puzzle, or get overly competitive during a friendly game of Scrabble. And when she's not enjoying the power of words: she's probably outside, sniffing around and greeting strangers with her best friend, Hank the cow dog.  

To reach her call: 404 - 685 - 2455 .

Emily Cureton / GPB News

A handful of Georgia schools participated in the April 20 walkouts to draw attention to gun violence. As GPB’s Emily Cureton reports, there seemed to be a divide between private and public schools in Southwest Atlanta.

Students who walked out of one of Georgia’s most elite private schools were warned they’ll be punished for it. Anna Kathryn Hodges is a junior at Woodward Academy in College Park. And the prospect of an unexcused absence and detention didn’t deter her.   

Emily Cureton / GPB News

Georgia Democrats are hoping 2018 is the year Gwinnett County finally turns blue.  Five Republican lawmakers are either retiring or running for other offices. Democrats are working hard to mobilize voters ahead of the May 22 primary and keep them energized into November.

Daniel Hilton is walking through a suburban neighborhood in metro Atlanta, holding his phone in one hand, and campaign materials in the other.  His T-shirt also has a message: “It says Excuse my Complexion," Hilton explains. "It’s not very subtle, but at the same time it does start a conversation."

GPB/Emily Cureton

Three weeks since 30,000 people filled Atlanta’s streets to march for gun control, about 80 people rallied under a banner of gun rights at the Georgia State Capitol.

Wikimedia Commons

Most studies suggest married people are happier than singles. But new research from Georgia State University points to an equalizer: money.  

The study looked at symptoms of mild depression. It found couples making more than $60,000 dollars a year fared the same as never-married people making that much on their own. 

AP Photo/David Goldman

 March 29, 4pm: 

The City of Atlanta is recovering slowly from a cyberattack that began March 22.  Some online customer services returned today, and Atlanta police officers are filing reports electronically again. The City says there's no indication the personal information of customers or employees was compromised. 

The City of Atlanta is still dealing with the fallout from a massive cyberattack Thursday. Since a group of hackers locked down the city's computer system with a malware called Ransomware, city employees have been unable to carry out essential business. Atlanta residents can't even pay their bills online. 

Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has condemned the attack. She has yet to confirm if the city will pay the $50,000 ransom hackers have demanded in exchange for the city to regain access to its data. Georgia Public Broadcasting reporter Emily Cureton updated us on the latest developments in the data breach. We also spoke with Milos Prvulovic, a professor in Georgia Tech's School of Computer Science.

Pixabay

The City of Atlanta is still dealing with the fallout from a massive cyberattack Thursday.

Since a group of hackers locked down the city's computer system with a malware called Ransomware, city employees have been unable to carry out essential business. Atlanta residents can't even pay their bills online. 

Those behind the attack are demanding about $50,000 in exchange for the city to regain access to its data.

Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has condemned the attack. She has yet to confirm if the city will pay the ransom. In the meantime Atlanta officials have resorted to filling out paperwork by hand. 

Emily Cureton / GPB News

Savannah State University’s Chief of Police James Barnwell remains on paid leave following allegations of sexual misconduct and harassment.

Abda Quillian is an attorney in Savannah. She alleges multiple incidents took place over the last two years. Quillian says she filed complaints on behalf of two women currently serving as campus police officers. One was addressed to the University System of Georgia’s Board of regents, and another went to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, a federal agency that enforces laws against workplace discrimination.

Court.Atlanta.gov

The City of Atlanta’s computer network is still under siege by a ransomware cyberattack that began March 22. The shutdown is backlogging the city’s justice system. 

People who showed up for municipal court Monday morning were turned away and told their court dates would be automatically rescheduled.  Jackson McKay drove six hours from Ocala, Florida to get documents he needs for an auto dealer license.

About 30,000 people turned out at the March For Our Lives in Atlanta Saturday to advocate for changes to gun laws. 

As volunteers worked the crowds to register voters, South Cobb High school student Niles Francis held his sign high above his head. It listed lawmakers who took money from the NRA. He’s still two years away from voting for the first time. But he’s determined to be heard now.

“A movement like this proves that your voice does matter,” Francis said.

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