Emily Cureton

Reporter

Emily Cureton is a reporter for GPB News.  Her background includes producing and hosting public radio, newspaper reporting and studying foreign languages. She's lived in New York, Texas, California and Oregon; spent time in Russia, and road-tripped through Mexico and Central America. She might help you finish that crossword puzzle, or get overly competitive during a friendly game of Scrabble. And when she's not enjoying the power of words: she's probably outside, sniffing around and greeting strangers with her best friend, Hank the cow dog.  

To reach her call: 404 - 685 - 2455 .

Southern rock band Drive-by Truckers was co-founded by friends Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley in 1996.  They still call Athens home, and they're planning a series of shows next month at the 40 Watt. We talk with Hood about the group’s latest record “American Band,” and his role as a musician in a politically tumultuous time.

Getting the flu is at best unpleasant. At worst, it can kill you.  Seven more Georgians died from the flu this month, bringing this season’s statewide death toll to twelve. And many more people end up in the hospital. The term flu shot is heard and used all the time, but not well understood. We broke it down with Emory University professor Robert Bednarczyk.

 

Last week, the Coca-Cola Company unveiled an ambitious plan to recycle a bottle or can for every drink it sells. It’s the latest move by the Atlanta-based soda giant to address environmental concerns tied to its production. Will this plan work? We talk with environmental historian Bart Elmore, author of the book, “Citizen Coke: The Making of Coca-Cola Capitalism.”

GPB News / Emily Cureton

Georgia’s film industry supports many actors, producers, directors...and also classical musicians. Like Tracy Woodard. She’s a violinist in Atlanta. And on any given day, you might catch her recording soundtracks for a new TV show, film, or video game. She’s also founder of an event series where contemporary composers present new scores for very old, silent movies. Tracy talked to us about writing music for movies, and where composers experiment.

The ongoing Atlanta bribery scandal brought a sentencing last week. Adam Smith, former chief procurement officer for Atlanta, got more than two years in jail. Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Scott Trubey has been following the bribery scandal, and he joins us in the studio.

This week marks the 157th anniversary of Georgia’s decision to secede from the union. By 1861, eleven states had left the United States to form the Confederacy. The new nation lasted four years before its defeat in 1865. But the dream of secession is still very much alive. We talk about this with Trey Hood, Political Science Professor at the University of Georgia. And Roxanne Donovan, Psychology Professor at Kennesaw State University.

 

 

 

For years, Atlanta has worked to fix failing public schools. Charter schools have begun to appear as an alternative to many of those troubled schools. In author David Osborne’s latest book, Reinventing America’s Schools, he suggests charter school-like guidelines that all schools should follow, including Atlanta’s. We talked with him and Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Maureen Downey.

 

 

Georgia’s Girl Scouts recently joined the debate over a Savannah bridge name. As it stands, Talmadge Memorial Bridge honors a segregationist. The Girl Scouts would like the bridge renamed in honor of their founder and Savannah native, Juliette Gordon Low. Today marks 91 years since Low’s death. We talk about her life with Girl Scouts historian Jami Brantley. She manages the Girl Scout First Headquarters Museum in Savannah.

Wikimedia Commons / Author Unknown

Georgia’s Girl Scouts recently joined the debate over a Savannah bridge name. As it stands, Talmadge Memorial Bridge honors a segregationist. The Girl Scouts would like the bridge renamed in honor of their founder and Savannah native, Juliette Gordon Low.  Today marks 91 years since Low’s death. We talk about her life with Girl Scouts historian Jami Brantley. She manages the Girl Scout First Headquarters Museum in Savannah.

Brian Brown

As metro Atlanta grows, the population of rural Georgia shrinks. Photographer Brian Brown is documenting the architecture of the country before it disappears. He started where he grew up, and created the website “Vanishing South Georgia.” Now he has sites devoted to North and Coastal Georgia, too. We talk with Brown about what there is to learn from decaying houses and shuttered storefronts.

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