Fenly Foxen

On Second Thought Producer/Reporter

Fenly has lived in Libya, South Africa and India. Fenly worked for news networks in South Africa, including CNBC Africa. She was an anchor/host of various shows, she developed in South Africa. She graduated from the University of Witwatersrand with a degree in Journalism. In the US, Fenly worked for CNN and WABE. She loves to travel, explore different cultures and read biographies.

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Before the new teen romantic comedy, “Love, Simon” hit the big screens, it was a novel. "Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda" follows the story of a highschool boy who struggles with his sexual identity.

The newest appointed director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is already facing serious accusations. Dr. Robert Redfield has been accused of fabricating or seriously botching HIV vaccine data. President Trump's appointee also has no experience running a public health organization. This problematic news comes months after the controversy with previous CDC director, Brenda Fitzgerald.

The City of Atlanta is still dealing with the fallout from a massive cyberattack Thursday. Since a group of hackers locked down the city's computer system with a malware called Ransomware, city employees have been unable to carry out essential business. Atlanta residents can't even pay their bills online. 

Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has condemned the attack. She has yet to confirm if the city will pay the $50,000 ransom hackers have demanded in exchange for the city to regain access to its data. Georgia Public Broadcasting reporter Emily Cureton updated us on the latest developments in the data breach. We also spoke with Milos Prvulovic, a professor in Georgia Tech's School of Computer Science.

For nearly three decades, Anthony Ray Hinton lived on Alabama's death row. 

When he was convicted in 1985 for allegedly murdering two restaurant managers, there were no witnesses. There were no fingerprints. And Hinton always maintained his innocence. 

In April 2015, the state of Alabama overturned his conviction and dropped all charges against him. He had spent nearly half his life in prison. 

We spoke with Hinton about his wrongful incarceration, what kept him fighting for justice and life since his exoneration. 

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The City of Atlanta is still dealing with the fallout from a massive cyberattack Thursday.

Since a group of hackers locked down the city's computer system with a malware called Ransomware, city employees have been unable to carry out essential business. Atlanta residents can't even pay their bills online. 

Those behind the attack are demanding about $50,000 in exchange for the city to regain access to its data.

Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has condemned the attack. She has yet to confirm if the city will pay the ransom. In the meantime Atlanta officials have resorted to filling out paperwork by hand. 

A teenager in Thomasville, Georgia is facing charges for allegedly stealing a gun from a car earlier in March. We've seen this problem across the state. In 2016 The Trace, an investigative news website, examined firearm theft in Atlanta and Savannah. finding Atlanta led many cities with its rate of guns stolen from automobiles. We spoke with Brian Freskos, a reporter who covers gun trafficking for The Trace. 

Former Georgia Gov. Zell Miller, 86, died Friday morning at his home in Young Harris. Miller was best known for pioneering the lottery-funded HOPE scholarship, which has provided nearly 9.5 billion dollars in financial assistance to millions of Georgia college students since its creation in 1992. 

 

Hiroki Yamamoto / Flickr

The gross weight of Georgia’s 2014 blueberry crop was 96 million pounds, but last year the crop’s production was hit with bad weather. Georgia blueberry farmers lost more than $340 million in crops due to the terrible climate.

We checked in with Albert Wildes, chairman of the Georgia Blueberry Commodity Commision, to learn the status of Georgia's blueberry industry this year. 

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The opioid crisis continues to ravage Georgia and the rest of the nation.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, prescription opioids caused more than 32,000 deaths in 2016.

Normally when you think of cherry blossoms, you think of Washington D.C. or Japan. But unbeknownst to a lot of tourists, Macon, Georgia is the Cherry Blossom Capital of the World. William A. Fickling Sr. discovered the distinctive blooms in his backyard in 1949.

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Today in the Breakroom we talked about this week's top stories.

Erik Voss

For Women’s History Month, On Second Thought is paying tribute to Georgia's female trailblazers. 

Civil Rights icon Dr. Roslyn Pope made history in 1960 when, as a student at Spelman College, she wrote “An Appeal for Human Rights." The document was instrumental in advancing the Atlanta Student Movement's efforts to end segregation.

On Second Thought producer Fenly Foxen spoke with Pope about her experiences as a student leader in the Civil Rights Movement. 

Opioid addiction is a major problem in Georgia. Several years ago, Governor Nathan Deal signed the "Good Samaritan" bill. The bill was created to prevent opioid overdose deaths by giving amnesty to anyone who reports drug-related emergencies. The measure also equips law enforcement and first responders with Naloxone, a drug that can reverse overdoses if given right away.

Frankenstein has been a popular novel turned movie since it was first published in 1818. At Emory University, three Atlanta playwrights took a new look at Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein with modern scientific research. They each contributed to a single show that’s being performed at the Atlanta Science Festival. We were joined by Neely Gossett and 

Now that it’s warming up, you may consider visiting one of Georgia’s many historic monuments. The Ocmulgee National Monument near Macon was designated as a National Treasure by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The most prominent features at Ocmulgee are huge earthen mounds that spread across 700 acres. Native Americans first settled there thousands of years ago. We talked with a professor at Middle Georgia State University, Matt Jennings, to learn more about the history.

Charlie Neibergall/AP

New organic meat regulations are coming in May. The USDA will be less strict on how animals are raised, fed and transported. We looked at what this means for Georgia’s massive poultry industry.

Atlanta’s professional soccer team has come a long way fast. Atlanta United took to the field for the first time in March 2017. Now it draws in tens of thousands of fans. Atlanta United FC squares off against the Vancouver Whitecaps on Saturday evening at the Mercedes-Benz Stadium. We talked with the team’s president, Darren Eales.

A month ago, 17 people died in a mass school shooting in Florida. To remember the victims, students nationwide are walking out of their classrooms Wednesday morning in solidarity. We talked with student Lauren Bengtson of Pope High School in Cobb County. Her father, Mike, also joined the conversation.  Then, we talked with Frank LoMonte of the Student Press Law Center about whether schools can take action against students who participate in Wednesday’s walkout. 

Sean Powers / GPB

According to a study released last year by the University of Chicago, more than 4 million youth in America face homelessness every year. As part of Women’s History Month, women from all over America were in Atlanta last week for a “sleep-out” at Covenant House Georgia, an area shelter.

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Last month, Atlanta’s mayor signed a measure to eliminate the city’s Municipal Court cash bond requirement for minor offenses. The alternative would be having many offenders sit in jail if they can’t afford bail. Other cities across the state are seeing similar calls to action. What does bail reform look like in other states, and what might it look like throughout Georgia?

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