J. Cindy Hill

GPB Savannah Station Manager

J. Cindy Hill joins GPB after three years serving as Arts Marketing Coordinator for Mercer University in Macon, her hometown. At Mercer she worked with The Grand Opera House, Townsend School of Music, the Robert McDuffie Center for Strings, Mercer Theatre and the new Tattnall Square Center for the Arts. She was the publicist for "A Grand Mercer Christmas", a co-production of Mercer and GPB featuring violinist Robert McDuffie, the Center for Strings and Mercer Singers, which was filmed on location at The Grand in 2012 and broadcast throughout the nation on public broadcasting stations in December 2013.

Prior to her work at Mercer, she served as Director of Marketing and Grants for Macon Arts Alliance, and Senior Marketing Producer for 13WMAZ-TV. She has also served as an arts columnist for The Telegraph and freelance writer for Macon Magazine. Her career began with a decade of film and television production in Atlanta, Los Angeles and Savannah. On her final film, "The Gift", Cindy spent six months living and working in Savannah, a place that felt immediately like home. She is excited to have the opportunity to return to this wonderful city and become a part of the community through her work at GPB.

She has served on numerous boards of state and local arts organizations. In her free time, Hill enjoys writing, photography, directing and producing theatre, attending arts events and doing almost anything at the beach.

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J. Cindy Hill

“What a perfect day for a parade." That sentiment was echoed by locals and visitors alike lining the route for Savannah’s 2018 St. Patrick’s Day celebration on a sunny, spring Saturday.

This year two longstanding traditions were challenged. First, the U.S Army asked that women not kiss their soldiers while they marched, citing concerns that it makes them look less professional. Plenty of other cadets and officers bore telltale bright red lipstick marks on their cheeks as they marched.

J. Cindy Hill

Savannah’s fountains are flowing green which means St. Patrick’s Day is here.  But this year there are a lot of changes. There's a new ban on the tradition of kissing soldiers and Vice President Mike Pence is visiting, so access in two squares will be restricted.  


Savannah Morning News executive editor Susan Catron says this bumps up against some longstanding Savannah traditions.



Cindy Hill-Williams / GPB

Hundreds of students at Savannah Arts Academy participated in today’s National School Walkout. The event was to protest gun violence and remember the seventeen students shot and killed one month ago at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida.

At first the Savannah-Chatham County School Board supported the student-organized events but later left each school to determine how to handle it on their own. Savannah Arts Academy’s principal, Gif Lockley, offered use of the school’s auditorium but students had other plans.

Savannah's City Council is considering proposals that would alter how people live and travel in parts of Savannah. Susan Catron is executive editor of Savannah Morning News and SavannahNow.com. She says both proposals raise questions about a common issue familiar to anyone who drives in Savannah.

Click here to read more about the proposed changes to parking on the south side of Forsyth Park.

It has been another busy week on the coast with news of Port funding, the future of Savannah's confederate monument and more. Susan Catron, executive editor of Savannah Morning News and SavannahNow.com, joined us to talk about news of the week. We started with why she says the 10th anniversary of the Imperial Sugar fire shouldn't be overlooked.

Savannah's Tourism Management Plan also proposes new restrictions on tours in the historic district. The City is scheduling public hearings to gather feedback about the plan.

In Savannah, two men work to bring Gullah-Geechee heritage to tourists.  James Pringle sits on a bench in Wright Square almost every day singing about history and slicing reeds in which he weaves into roses. 

Jamal Toure' teaches Africana Studies at Savannah State University and leads tourists on walking tours that highlight Gullah history in Georgia.

This project is supported in part by Georgia Humanities through appropriations made by the Georgia General Assembly.

This week we’re hearing how some descendants are passing along Gullah heritage to the next generation. Patricia West is a writer and professor at Savannah State University. She was inspired to document her family’s roots after discovering her great great-grandmother’s grave on a trip to the family cemetery. 

The Scott-West family is also looking for ways to celebrate their history. Later this week, we will join them at the centuries-old cemetery where their American heritage begins, for a libations ceremony honoring ancestors.

Wikiemedia / Whoisjohngalt

The Georgia Department of Public Health says flu is still widespread across Georgia. Their latest report shows 671 people have been hospitalized and 25 people have died from influenza, and the number of people being treated for the flu at home is six times above average.

Coastal District public health director, Dr. Lawton Davis says that’s why they’re offering free flu shots next Friday.

J. Cindy Hill

At midnight on February 1, the Savannah-Chatham County Metro Police department will no longer exist. City leaders voted in July to dissolve the joint department after the county questioned the cost of the combined force. Starting Thursday the Savannah Police will patrol the city and Chatham County Police will patrol the county, with help from Chatham County Sheriff’s Department.

J. Cindy Hill

Two rallies today drew two very different groups to downtown Savannah today. In Ellis Square, supporters of 

President Donald Trump held a rally on the sunny lawn. Republican leaders spoke to a gathering of around fifty people. Representative Buddy Carter, a Republican and supporter of the president, was supposed to attend but the government shutdown kept him in Washington. He spoke to the gathering over the phone, highlighting the GOP's accomplishments during Trump's first year in office. Others spoke about a return to Christian conservative values.