Leah Fleming

Morning Edition Host

Leah Fleming is an award winning radio host and correspondent.

You can hear her greet you to each weekday morning on 88.5 GPB Atlanta’s Morning Edition from NPR News.

Leah is a familiar voice on public radio having hosted morning and afternoon programming in Atlanta, Albany, New York, Jacksonville and Miami, Florida.

Leah says her passion for diversity in public radio is what keeps her in the genre.  Her goal for Georgia Public Broadcasting’s Morning Edition is to offer the listener a unique experience of news, culture and trends of interest to African Americans and other diverse groups in the greater Atlanta area.  She believes that listeners, no matter what their ethnic make-up, find value in content that explores and celebrates all cultures.   

Leah joined GPB in 2012 following six years at WLRN-Miami Herald News, in Miami, where she served as All Things Considered anchor before being named deputy news director.

Prior to her time in South Florida, Leah worked as Morning Edition host at WABE Public Radio in Atlanta, Georgia. There she was acknowledged for her work including an award from the National Association of Black Journalists for her interview with professional boxer Laila Ali.

Leah has also worked at NPR in Washington, DC as a producer and served as a mentor with NPR’s Next Generation project.

Raised in New York, Leah holds a Master of Science degree in communication arts.

Ways to Connect

 

Today’s music minute features Atlanta artist Andre 3000, who doesn’t produce much music anymore. But when he does, it’s still special.

The song, titled “Me&My"(To Bury Your Parents), was a suprising release last weekend. It's one of two track dedicated to his deceased parents

André’s mother died one day after his birthday in 2013.  His father died the following year.

 

Turns out Andre doesn’t just do vocals: he also plays bass clarinet.

Colleges and universities across Georgia have wrapped up the semester, but one Morehouse College student has more work to do. Last year, Julien Turner took an extra credit biology assignment and turned it into a viral music video about the differences between mitosis and meiosis. The rising junior's video made it all the way to the people who work on "Sesame Street." Now, Julien and his brother are creating an educational music video for the show. Julien spoke with GPB's Leah Fleming about the project.

Dreadhead Films LLC / Screenshot by GPB

Colleges and universities across Georgia have wrapped up the semester, but one Morehouse College student has more work to do. Last year, Julien Turner took an extra credit biology assignment and turned it into a viral music video about the differences between mitosis and meiosis. The rising junior's video made it all the way to the people who work on "Sesame Street." Now, Julien and his brother are creating an educational music video for the show. Julien spoke with GPB's Leah Fleming about the project.

Atlanta’s Donald Glover has found a new level of success. He’s an actor, the creator of a hit show named after his hometown of Atlanta, and a rapper under the name Childish Gambino. But his most powerful statement might be “This Is America”, a new song and video released over the weekend. Freelance entertainment reporter Jewel Wicker gives us her take on the video and what role musicians should play when it comes to social issues.

Momento Mori / Flickr

Georgia’s director of Family and Children Services says the opioid crisis is the main reason behind a recent surge in the foster care population.  More than 15,000 children are being cared for by the state, according to DFCS director Virginia Pryor. That’s nearly double what the population was five years ago.

American Advisors Group / Flickr

American women are living longer than ever. The average woman lives to be about 81 years old. But a new study reports that, after working with a lifelong gender pay gap and interrupting their careers to take care of children, spouses or aging parents, women could fall far short of saving what they need to support themselves in retirement.

Jared Rodriguez / Truthout / Flickr

As students prepare for college, they have a big concern: the cost.

 

The Institute for Higher Education Policy finds 70 percent of colleges unaffordable for lower-income and middle-income students. That’s if they don’t take out a student loans.

 

Atlanta’s Donald Glover has found a new level of success.

He’s an actor, the creator of a hit show named after his hometown of Atlanta, and a rapper under the name Childish Gambino.

But his most powerful statement might be “This Is America”, a new song and video released over the weekend.

 

Dailymail

 

In the United States, school shootings have been one of the most hotly debated topics in 2018.

 

The issue was re-ignited in February, when 17 people were killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida

 

 

In some cases, the people behind these crimes are dealing with a form of mental illness, including one man who attempted a school shooting in Atlanta in 2013.

Sadayuki Mikami / AP

Maynard Jackson Jr. was an Atlanta legend. As the first black mayor of a major southern city, Jackson pushed for businesses to adopt affirmative action programs, expanded the Atlanta airport to become the international hub it is today and also led the campaign to bring the 1996 Summer Olympics to Georgia.

 

Jackson's life and legacy are the focus of the new documentary, "Maynard," which was executive produced by his daughter-in-law Wendy Jackson and his son Maynard Jackson III.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are using DNA technology to try and prevent future E. coli outbreaks.

 

The method is called genome sequencing and it could eliminate the guessing game when it comes to finding the source of E. coli outbreaks. With it, scientists can determine the exact food and location in which the contaminated produce originated.

Liz West / Flickr

At least one person has died and more than 100 people have fallen ill from E. coli following a recent outbreak in connection with romaine lettuce from Arizona.

 

"Do not eat or buy romaine lettuce unless you can confirm it is not from the Yuma, Arizona growing region," says a statement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "This includes any pre-packaged salads or salad mixes.”

 

Dr. Patricia Griffin, chief of the enteric diseases epidemiology branch at the CDC, explains how the recent outbreak happened and what consumers should be aware of when buying produce.

The Carolina Parakeet was a wild bird in lots of senses of the word; it flew throughout the Southeast and Midwest, including along the Georgia coast. Revolutionary War soldiers and Manifest Destiny explorers journaled about their bright green plumage and “disagreeable screams.” And they were thought to be poisonous, because they ate cocklebur seeds that were harmless to them but toxic to cats hoping for a feathered meal. The birds went extinct at the beginning of the 20th century. Now, researcher Kevin Burgio is using their migration patterns and physiology as a means to explore how we can save at-risk species today.

STACEYABRAMS.COM | STACEYEVANS.COM

Across the country, record numbers of women are running for elected office in this year’s midterms — and a lot of them are running for the first time. In Georgia, the highest-profile race is the Democratic race for governor, which is pitting Stacey Abrams against Stacey Evans.

 

Elsewhere in the state, more women are running for legislative seats than in years past. Since 2016, the number of women seeking state Senate seats has increased by 40 percent and the number seeking spots in the state House is up about 20 percent. For Democrats especially, the 2018 midterms are a huge opportunity, with the party vying for spots in 121 spots (the most since 2004). Many of those candidates are first-timers, many are in historically red districts and many are women.

Courtesy of the Robo Sapiens

A group of middle school students from Dacula, Georgia, is preparing for a world championship. This weekend the “Robo Sapiens” will head to Louisville, Kentucky for the 2018 VEX Robotics World Championship, where they will present the findings of their latest research on racist robots and bias in artificial intelligence.

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