Rickey Bevington

Senior Anchor/ Correspondent

As Senior Anchor/Correspondent, Rickey Bevington is a mainstay with Atlantans during the afternoon drive as local host for NPR's nationally syndicated "All Things Considered" weekdays from 4 to 7 p.m.

Bevington brings more than 15 years of award-winning experience in the media industry including cable entertainment at Sundance Channel and Showtime Networks, local TV news at WFSB-TV 3 (CBS) in Hartford, Conn., publishing with Fodor's and the Hartford Courant, and reporting for NPR and PBS. Her work is recognized by local and national journalism organizations including the Southeast Emmys, Georgia Association of Broadcasters, Public Radio News Directors Inc, Associated Press and Society of Professional Journalists.

Bevington was recognized with the prestigious "History In The Media" award by the Georgia Historical Society. In her prior role as GPB’s News Director of TV, Radio & Digital, Bevington led the news team to win two regional Emmys and GPB's first national Edward R. Murrow Award. An Atlanta native, Bevington is a believer in volunteerism and shaping her community. She serves on the Board of the Georgia Associated Press Media Editors, the Atlanta BeltLine Young Leaders Council and has served as a board member and Chairman of the Board for the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art. In March 2014, Bevington was the only Georgian appointed to a prestigious Marshall Memorial Fellowship by the German Marshall Fund of the United States. While in the post, she travels throughout Europe studying public policy issues impacting the U.S. and the European Union. Bevington participated in L.E.A.D. Atlanta, an intensive eight-month leadership program, and she is an active member of the Atlanta Press Club.

Ways to Connect

Eagles Landing Educational Research Committee

A bill that passed just hours before the end of this year’s legislative session is creating conflict for some residents of Henry County.

If Governor Nathan Deal signs it, voters could create the new city of Eagles Landing, and with it, their own government, tax base and services.

To do so, they would take away land, revenue and residents from the city of Stockbridge.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms unveiled a new transparency tool today aimed at sharing city spending with the public.

Stuart Isett / Fortune Most Powerful Women

On the rare occasion a woman shatters that glass ceiling and makes it to the boardroom as chief executive officer, she still may have to contend with a form of sexism — especially when the board of directors is made up of men.

The problem comes from the traditional role of women in men’s eyes, according to a study published in Strategic Management Journal.

LISTEN TO THE FULL INTERVIEW:

AUGUSTA NATIONAL

It is springtime at Augusta National Golf Club, and that means The Masters is in town.

About 250,000 people are expected in Augusta this week. That brings millions of dollars to the local economy.

GPB’s Drew Dawson is in Augusta and has the latest on what’s happening around town.

AP Images

The 2018 legislative session wrapped up just after midnight last night.

I talked with the AJC’s Political Insider Jim Galloway about the winners and losers of this year’s legislative session.

  

RICKEY BEVINGTON: Let's start with hands free driving. What are the new rules that people are going to start having to obey?

Andre M / Wikimedia Commons

Georgia's 40-day legislative session wraps up at midnight on Thursday, and that means lawmakers have just over 48 hours to pass new laws.

GPB’s Bill Nigut, host of Political Rewind,  joined me in the studio to talk about what is happening in the final sprint.

RICKEY BEVINGTON: So let's start with three bills that have already been secured. Governor Nathan Deal has signed the adoption bill, the mid-year budget, and tax cuts. What is in those?

Isabeth Mendoza, GPB News

More than 700 people visited Monday Night Garage on Friday, March 9 for a special live broadcast of NPR All Things Considered with host Rickey Bevington.

The show was all about the state's alcohol culture: From Georgia's founding as a dry colony to the modern-day discussions of cocktails at brunch, we've got you covered.

Georgia laws haven't always been as friendly to brewers and distillers, even after Prohibition ended. 

During our special live show focusing on Georgia's alcohol history and culture, I talked with Monday Night Brewing's Chief Operating Officer Joel Iverson about recent changes to laws that have allowed breweries across the state to take off.

Brewing beer is a lot like cooking food. There's ingredients, a recipe, and if things aren't cleaned right ahead of time, you might not like the way it turns out. 

During our special live show focusing on Georgia's alcohol history and culture, I talked with Monday Night Brewing's Head Brewer Peter Kiley about his career pathway, and why beer tastes the way it does.

University Of Georgia

Walk around the University of Georgia campus today and you’ll find plenty of students who don’t drink or do drugs. 

As of two years ago, UGA is no longer among the top 20 “Best Party Schools” ranked by the Princeton Review. 

I sat down with UGA students Chelsea, Miranda, Jake, Tyler and Mikala. 

We are not revealing their last names because several asked to use first names only, so we made the choice to do that for all of the students we interviewed.  

They asked each other questions about what college is like when you don’t drink.

Pages