Rickey Bevington

Senior Anchor/ Correspondent

As Senior Anchor/Correspondent, Rickey Bevington is a mainstay with Atlantans during the afternoon drive as local host for NPR's nationally syndicated "All Things Considered" weekdays from 4 to 7 p.m.

Bevington brings more than 15 years of award-winning experience in the media industry including cable entertainment at Sundance Channel and Showtime Networks, local TV news at WFSB-TV 3 (CBS) in Hartford, Conn., publishing with Fodor's and the Hartford Courant, and reporting for NPR and PBS. Her work is recognized by local and national journalism organizations including the Southeast Emmys, Georgia Association of Broadcasters, Public Radio News Directors Inc, Associated Press and Society of Professional Journalists.

Bevington was recognized with the prestigious "History In The Media" award by the Georgia Historical Society. In her prior role as GPB’s News Director of TV, Radio & Digital, Bevington led the news team to win two regional Emmys and GPB's first national Edward R. Murrow Award. An Atlanta native, Bevington is a believer in volunteerism and shaping her community. She serves on the Board of the Georgia Associated Press Media Editors, the Atlanta BeltLine Young Leaders Council and has served as a board member and Chairman of the Board for the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art. In March 2014, Bevington was the only Georgian appointed to a prestigious Marshall Memorial Fellowship by the German Marshall Fund of the United States. While in the post, she travels throughout Europe studying public policy issues impacting the U.S. and the European Union. Bevington participated in L.E.A.D. Atlanta, an intensive eight-month leadership program, and she is an active member of the Atlanta Press Club.

Ways to Connect

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

The Georgia Tech community is left with many questions after a student leader was fatally shot by campus police last weekend.

GPB News

As the world comes to grips with the unprecedented damage of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, millions of Americans in the southeastern United States are working to rebuild their lives. Irma crossed into Georgia in the early morning hours of Monday, September 11, 2017. Over the next 24 hours, water inundated island and beach communities over 100 miles of coastline. Winds topping 69 miles per hour toppled trees and power lines. 1.1 million Georgians lost power and three lost their lives.

Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Ambassador Andrew Young has worn many hats in his storied life of service to Atlanta.

In the 1970s, he served as a Congressman for Georgia’s 5th District and Ambassador to the United Nations as part of the Carter administration.

For most of the '80s, he was mayor of Atlanta, and in the years since has established the Andrew J. Young Foundation to continue work on economic, educational and human rights issues around the world.

He sat down with Rickey Bevington in the SkyView Ferris Wheel in Downtown Atlanta and shared some of his perspectives on issues past, present and future.

Jessica Gurell / GPB

Every day in the United States 91 people die of opioid overdose. That includes prescription opiates and heroin. Over a year, that’s more than ten times the number of people who died on 9/11. On today’s “On Second Thought,” we’re going to hear from some of the people struggling with addiction, those who offer help, and communities caught in the middle.

Goshen Brewing Company

Starting Friday, Sept. 1, Georgians won’t need to take a tour to sample alcohol at their favorite brewery. They’ll also be able to take some home with them.

The new law, SB 85, breaks the strict alcohol system put into place after Prohibition.

Attorney Charlie Suessmith explains why Georgia has so tightly regulated alcohol for nearly a century. 

Jessica Gurell / GPB

Opioids are a $10 billion industry for pharmaceutical companies. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, from 1999 to 2014, more than 165,000 persons died from overdose related to opioid pain medication in the United States. Today, thousands more are struggling with drug dependency that started with opioids given to them by doctors.

woodruffcenter.org

The Woodruff Arts Center has a new chief executive.

The Midtown Atlanta campus includes the High Museum of Art, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Alliance Theater.

Doug Shipman takes the helm of the nation’s third-largest arts center at a time when public funding for the arts is under threat and institutions are facing new questions about inclusivity and diversity. 

footiemob.club

Atlanta’s new MLS team plays Saturday before its seventh straight sold-out home crowd. Atlanta United hosts the Colorado Rapids Saturday at 7 p.m. at Bobby Dodd Stadium, the team's temporary home until Mercedes-Benz Stadium opens in August.

Valerie / Flickr/CC

As Georgia State University and its development partners move forward on redeveloping downtown Atlanta’s Turner Field, neighbors of the former Atlanta Braves stadium are locked in a bitter struggle over how to secure things like affordable housing, green space, jobs and connectivity.

Vimeo

Tupac Shakur is one of the most famous rappers in history. Until his murder in 1996 at the age of 25, Shakur was a figurehead of the West Coast rap scene. 

So Tupac Shakur’s connection to Georgia might surprise you.

Major League Baseball

On Friday April 14, GPB Atlanta broadcasted “All Things Considered” live from SunTrust Park, the Atlanta Braves' new baseball stadium in Cobb County.

It was the first home game of the season for the Braves and the first time fans would experience the new $1.1 billion stadium complex.

In the show we’ll take a look at important moments in Braves history, at the mixed-use development around SunTrust Park called “The Battery” and, of course - talk about traffic.

Rickey Bevington

When the Atlanta Braves announced their move to the suburbs in 2013, some skeptics foresaw an exodus of residents fleeing game day traffic and crowds.

Four years later, Cobb County home sales are outpacing other metro counties.  

VOLTA create

An Atlanta entrepreneur is the subject of a new documentary television series premiering Tuesday on Viceland.  

On Sunday, about 100 Atlanta Film Festival audience members gathered at Dad's Garage Theater for a somewhat surprise screening of the Ondi Timoner project. "We planned this 48 hours ago," said Timoner. "It makes perfect sense for us to be here because Jimmy's from Atlanta." 

ChooseATL

South by Southwest (SXSW) is an annual conference and festival in Austin, Texas.

It brings together global innovators in media, entertainment, music and film for a week of concerts and conversations. 

The Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce’s marketing arm ChooseATL is bringing a number of musicians, entrepreneurs and local companies to Austin this weekend.

Stephen Fowler, GPB News

Several hundred people lined up along rooftops, parking decks and surface streets to watch this morning's controlled implosion of the Georgia Archives Building.

Built in 1965, the "White Ice Cube" across from the Capitol has been empty since 2003 after engineers determined the building was sinking.

Stephen Fowler, GPB News

Atlanta’s first Major League Soccer team plays its inaugural game Sunday to a sold out crowd.

Atlanta United hosts one of the league’s founding clubs, the well-established New York Red Bulls.

It’ll be a tough contest for the fledgling Atlanta team.

Yesterday, I drove out to Flowery Branch to see how they’re playing and feeling ahead of their first game.

About three dozen soccer players are scrimmaging in small groups of six at their practice facility about an hour north of Atlanta. 

Matt Terrell

If you live in the South, you are more likely to be diagnosed with HIV.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says one in 51 Georgians will contract the virus in their lifetime.

Atlanta is considered to have a "concentrated HIV epidemic," largely due to poverty and high-risk behaviors such as injectable drug use.

A new public art exhibition opening Valentine's Day at Centennial Olympic Park illustrates Atlanta's growing HIV infection rate.

It's called "Atlanta's HIV+ Population Now."

E.K. Sluder

On Friday February 3, GPB Atlanta broadcasted "All Things Considered" live from the High Museum of Art's monthly "First Friday" event.

Orogen is nominated for a GRAMMY for Best New Age Album
johnburkemusic.com

In 2016, at only 28-years-old, pianist John Burke has already accomplished the dream of a lifetime for many musicians -- to be nominated for a Grammy Award. It's for his newest album "Orogen," a breathtaking journey through what he describes as the creation of mountains.

 

 

Illustration: Stephen Fowler, GPB News

The Georgia Institute of Technology is known for graduating its students from nationally-ranked programs in science, technology, engineering and math.

A new class taught by visiting professor Dr. Joyce Wilson is using hip-hop to take those students down a more creative pathway than their STEM studies to learn about issues such as race, poverty and cultural identity.

The class is titled “Exploring the Lyrics of OutKast and Trap Music to Explore Politics of Social Justice.”

Dr. Wilson joined me in the studio to explain why she’s teaching trap at Tech.

Bubba73 / Wikimedia Commons

At the time, it was the deadliest crash in aviation history. On Sunday morning, June 3, 1962, Atlanta was stunned by the news that a plane carrying 106 of its citizens had crashed on take-off at Orly Airfield near Paris, France. Below, you can watch the 2001 GPB documentary "The Day Atlanta Stood Still."

Burnaway

Atlanta’s creative output is impressive.

The metro region has 492 registered arts organizations from museums and galleries to movie theaters to furniture makers.

Statewide, the annual revenue of arts organizations is nearly $800 million.

To learn more about how arts influence the daily lives of Atlantans, Rickey Bevington speaks with Susannah Darrow, Executive Director of Arts ATL, a nonprofit publication providing arts criticism and coverage.

Palladium Theater Stuttgart/A. Sauerbrunn

There's a measure before the Atlanta City Council that would impose tougher restrictions on newly built music recording studios.

Supporters say it addresses problems with noise in residential areas. Studio owners are calling it misinformed and harmful to Atlanta's $4 billion music industry and 80 privately-owned studios.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Since the start of the Syrian civil war in 2011, the federal government has resettled 400 Syrian refugees in Georgia.

Last year, Governor Nathan Deal issued an executive order halting resettlement of Syrians in Georgia, but rescinded it after the attorney general issued a legal opinion against the order.

U.S. Ambassador Ryan Crocker says that’s a good thing.

He has served both Republican and Democratic presidents representing the United States in countries including Afghanistan, Syria and Iraq.

Crocker recently joined Rickey Bevington in the studio for a conversation about ISIS, the Trump administration and refugees in America.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Tracy V. Wilson and Holly Frey host the popular podcast Stuff You Missed In History Class in the Atlanta offices at HowStuffWorks at Ponce City Market.

They joined me during our live show from the rooftop of Ponce City Market to talk about what it’s like to produce a history podcast in a historic building – and also some of their personal connections with the Sears company, which built this building in 1926.

Safe Harbor Yes

The Safe Harbor Act is one of the four amendments Georgians will be voting on in next Tuesday's election.

If it passes, the state will impose additional fees on those convicted of certain sex trafficking crimes, as well as adult entertainment establishments. That money will fund treatment and resources for victims of child sex trafficking.

Stephen Fowler, GPB News

For this edition of Atlanta Considered, I went to Chrome Yellow Trading Company on Edgewood Avenue during the A3C hip-hop festival and conference.

A3C is one of the nation’s largest urban music events and stands for All Three Coasts, as Atlanta joins New York and Los Angeles as the pillars of hip-hop culture.

 

Stephen Fowler / GPB

Atlanta may see a first: Tonight thousands of people may come to a candlelight vigil for a grocery store. "Murder Kroger" as it's known closes its door tomorrow, October 28 after serving Ponce de Leon Avenue for three decades. GPB's Stephen Fowler was live at "Murder Kroger" in the shadow of Ponce City Market. 

Rickey Bevington: So let's begin with why many Atlantans call this supermarket "Murder Kroger." 

Atlanta-based director and actor Tyler Perry is prolific in stage, television and big-screen projects.

Many are produced at Tyler Perry Studios at Atlanta's former Fort MacPherson.

I sat down with Perry to discuss his latest film "Boo! A Madea Halloween."

Rickey Bevington: Tyler Perry, thank you for joining me.

Tyler Perry: Thank you for having me here Rickey. I appreciate it very much. This is very NPR (laughs).

Photo Rickey Bevington

Southwest Georgia’s phantasmagorical homestead known as Pasaquan opens to the public Saturday after a two-year, multi-million dollar restoration.

The seven acre site is the life’s work of eccentric artist Eddie Owens Martin.

Pasaquan is hard to describe. You pull off a flat, tree-lined road down a gravel driveway and the first thing you see is a tall pagoda and long, high wall covered with brightly colored designs.

“Dope,” is the first reaction from University of Georgia art graduate student Katherine Miller.

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