Rickey Bevington

Senior Anchor/ Correspondent

As Senior Anchor/Correspondent, Rickey Bevington is a mainstay with Atlantans during the afternoon drive as local host for NPR's nationally syndicated "All Things Considered" weekdays from 4 to 7 p.m.

Bevington brings more than 15 years of award-winning experience in the media industry including cable entertainment at Sundance Channel and Showtime Networks, local TV news at WFSB-TV 3 (CBS) in Hartford, Conn., publishing with Fodor's and the Hartford Courant, and reporting for NPR and PBS. Her work is recognized by local and national journalism organizations including the Southeast Emmys, Georgia Association of Broadcasters, Public Radio News Directors Inc, Associated Press and Society of Professional Journalists.

Bevington was recognized with the prestigious "History In The Media" award by the Georgia Historical Society. In her prior role as GPB’s News Director of TV, Radio & Digital, Bevington led the news team to win two regional Emmys and GPB's first national Edward R. Murrow Award. An Atlanta native, Bevington is a believer in volunteerism and shaping her community. She serves on the Board of the Georgia Associated Press Media Editors, the Atlanta BeltLine Young Leaders Council and has served as a board member and Chairman of the Board for the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art. In March 2014, Bevington was the only Georgian appointed to a prestigious Marshall Memorial Fellowship by the German Marshall Fund of the United States. While in the post, she travels throughout Europe studying public policy issues impacting the U.S. and the European Union. Bevington participated in L.E.A.D. Atlanta, an intensive eight-month leadership program, and she is an active member of the Atlanta Press Club.

Ways to Connect

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Is there an Atlanta name you're curious to know the history behind? Click on this link and write your idea in the comments section.

Listen to our summer series "What's In A Name?" during All Things Considered weekdays from 4 to 7 p.m. on Atlanta's NPR News station 88.5 FM

WSB-TV Atlanta

In just over a week, Lt. Governor Casey Cagle and Secretary of State Brian Kemp face off in the Republican runoff for Georgia's gubernatorial race.

Recent polling shows Cagle in a tight race with Kemp.

On Monday, Cagle landed a big co-sign from current Governor Nathan Deal. GPB’s Stephen Fowler has been tracking endorsements. He joined me in the studio to discuss Deal’s endorsement and the final days of the runoff election.


What's In A Name? | Druid Hills

Jul 16, 2018

Druid Hills is one of Atlanta's most well-known neighborhoods and streets.

In this "What's In A Name," as requested by listeners Forest McMullen and Lisa Mount, we'll be diving into the unexpected history of the northeast Atlanta neighborhood.


He was a Baptist minister, an Atlanta civil rights legend, and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s best friend. 

Ralph David Abernathy's name can also be found on many streets across the city.

This summer during All Things Considered on 88.5 FM in Atlanta host Rickey Bevington is telling stories about some of Atlanta’s most interesting place names. 

What's In A Name? | Snapfinger Road

Jul 10, 2018
USGS Publications Warehouse

This summer on All Things Considered we’re telling stories about some of Atlanta’s most interesting names.

Host Rickey Bevington takes your submissions and then brings you the history behind the places Atlantans call home.

We're calling it “What’s In A Name?

 


Steve Hersey

This summer during All Things Considered on 88.5 FM in Atlanta, host Rickey Bevington is telling stories about some of Atlanta’s most interesting names.

We’re calling the project “What’s In A Name?”


Wikimedia Commons

This summer during All Things Considered on 88.5 FM in Atlanta host Rickey Bevington is telling stories about some of Atlanta’s most interesting place names. 

We’re calling the project “What’s In A Name?

Today, we look at the Tom Moreland Interchange, more commonly known as Spaghetti Junction.


Wikimedia Commons

This summer on All Things Considered we’re telling stories about some of Atlanta’s most interesting names.

Host Rickey Bevington takes your submissions and then brings you the history behind the places Atlantans call home.

We're calling it “What’s In A Name?


Google Images

This summer on All Things Considered we’re telling stories about some of Atlanta’s most interesting names.

Host Rickey Bevington takes your submissions and then brings you the history behind the places Atlantans call home.

We’re calling the project “What’s In A Name?

Today's comes from my Georgia Public Broadcasting colleague Virginia Prescott who asks about the Blandtown neighborhood just west of Atlantic Station.


Georgians are learnig to abide by the state's new "hands-free" driving law.

Atlanta United drew the world's largest sports crowd on Saturday. 

Early voting gets underway today in Georgia's Runoff Election Tuesday, July 24th. 

Atlanta Journal Constitution Archives

This summer on All Things Considered we’re telling stories about some of Atlanta’s most interesting names.

Host Rickey Bevington takes your submissions and then brings you the history behind the places Atlantans call home.

We’re calling the project “What’s In A Name?”

Today, we look at the lost Atlanta neighborhood of Buttermilk Bottom.

 


The Atlanta neighborhood of Buckhead was named after a dead deer. African-American families in the early 20th century picked "Just Us" to call their new neighborhood south of downtown. The developer of Wieuca Road named it after his three daughters: Wilma, Eugenia, Catherine - Wi-eu-ca (pronounced WHY-yoo-cuh).

All summer long here on All Things Considered we’re telling stories about some of Atlanta’s most interesting names.

We’re calling it “What’s In A Name?”

Viola Davis

More women are running for elected office this fall. The number of female candidates for U.S. Congress has doubled since 2016.

In Georgia, DeKalb County activist Viola Davis launched a last minute campaign to unseat her longtime representative in last month's primary election — and she won.

GPB’s Stephen Fowler has been following the midterm elections, and he joined Rickey Bevington in the studio to talk about this race and the greater context of women running for office.


Ingrid Christie/Little, Brown and Company

A new book of short stories by David Sedaris includes his signature humorous family antics, from clothes shopping in Japan to naming the family beach house "Sea Section." But in Calypso, the 61-year-old also contemplates his own aging body and the pain of watching his elderly father deteriorate. He joined me in the studio to talk more about the book and the parts of his life that inspired it.


WHENISCALENDARS.COM/GOOGLE IMAGES

Primary election day is May 22 and all of the state's top elected officials are on the ballot. There will be a new governor, lieutenant governor and secretary of state. Every U.S. House seat is up as well.  GPB’s Stephen Fowler has been following these races. He joined Rickey Bevington in the studio to talk about some of the challenges these offices will face, regardless of the election's outcome. 

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

In this afternoon Latin class at Cristo Rey Atlanta’s downtown building, 20 uniformed teenagers recite words illuminated on the wall by an overhead projector.

But it’s no ordinary Catholic school.

Cristo Rey Atlanta is one of a network of 32 Catholic schools nationwide that only accept students living below the poverty line.

  

jbouie / Foter

Governor Nathan Deal is ending his final year in office by vetoing a record-high 21 bills.

Yesterday marked the close of a 40-day window in which the Governor could veto a bill, sign it, or let it go into law without a signature.

Greg Bluestein is a political reporter for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and a panelist on GPB’s Political Rewind. He joined me in the studio to talk about yesterday’s signings, and the legacy Governor Deal leaves behind.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

The Atlanta BeltLine is the city’s ambitious urban redevelopment project that, when finished, will encompass more than 22 miles of trails in a ring around Atlanta.

On parts of the BeltLine that are already opened, developers have brought more than four billion dollars of private investment in shopping, dining, office and living spaces.  

Dwayne Vaughn is the BeltLine’s new Vice President of Housing Policy and Development. It’s his job to make sure it stays accessible to Atlantans of all socioeconomic backgrounds.

Eagles Landing Educational Research Committee

UPDATE 5/8/2018: Gov. Nathan Deal signed into law a bill that would allow part of the city of Stockbridge to be annexed if the new city of Eagles Landing is formed. This was one of the more controversial measures on his desk to sign by Tuesday's deadline.

ORIGINAL STORY: A bill that passed just hours before the end of this year’s legislative session is creating conflict for some residents of Henry County.

If Governor Nathan Deal signs it, voters could create the new city of Eagles Landing, and with it, their own government, tax base and services.

To do so, they would take away land, revenue and residents from the city of Stockbridge.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms unveiled a new transparency tool today aimed at sharing city spending with the public.

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