Ryan McFadin

Associate Producer - On Second Thought

Ryan McFadin is an associate producer of "On Second Thought." Before joining GPB he worked at WOSU’s "All Sides." Ryan was born in Dallas, Texas, grew up in Lawrenceville, and was a philosophy major at The Ohio State University. In his free time he enjoys music, sports, and the outdoors.

A new novel by Atlanta-based author Nic Stone explores police violence against people of color through the eyes of a teenage boy. He tries to make sense of contemporary racism using the teachings of Martin Luther King Jr., asking if those teachings still hold up. “Dear Martin” is out today, Oct. 17. The book launches with an event tonight at The National Center for Human and Civil Rights in Atlanta. Author Nic Stone joins us live in the studio.

Musical acts from all over the world come to Atlanta this weekend for the Afropunk Music Festival. One group performing is Georgia’s own, Algiers. Their latest album is called “The Underside of Power.” GPB’s Sean Powers catches up with lead singer, Franklin James Fisher.

The winners of this year’s Nobel Prizes were announced last week. Last month, slightly less prestigious awards honored the funny side of scientific discovery. The Ig Nobel Prizes have been awarded annually since 1991 to honor achievements that “first make people laugh, and then make them think.” We talk about silly science with Marc Abraham, an organizer and founder of the Ig Nobel Prizes. Also with us is Georgia Tech doctoral student Patricia Yang, who won an Ig Nobel Prize in 2015.

He might be Georgia’s second best known politician. And perhaps its most polarizing. Bestselling author Craig Shirley sits down with us to talk about his latest book, “Citizen Newt.” It follows the career of Newt Gingrich. Emory professor of History, Joe Crespino also joins us to help breakdown key moments of Gingrich's political life.

Animal Legal Defence Fund

Two major puppy mill were busted in Georgia this year. One in April rescued more than 350 animals. Last month in Fulton County, authorities found 60 dogs, 53 lizards, a rabbit and a piranha at another site. We talk with Jessica Rock, Founding Partner at Animal Law Source.

Two major puppy mill were busted in Georgia this year. One in April rescued more than 350 animals. Last month in Fulton County, authorities found 60 dogs, 53 lizards, a rabbit and a piranha at another site. We talk with Jessica Rock, Founding Partner at Animal Law Source.

The Breakroom returns! We discuss robot chefs, Amazon’s new HQ, and Nintendo brining back some 16 bit magic. We also examine Trump's handling of Puerto Rico, middle fingers, and gun laws, or lack thereof… Joining us this week are Kathy Lohr, Hector Fernandez, Christian Zsilavetz, and Greg Williams.

On Monday, the Atlanta City Council voted unanimously to weaken punishments for the possession of marijuana. Now, those caught with an ounce or less will not serve jail time, and will be fined no more than $75. We talk about this monumental move with Andrea Young, Executive Director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia. 

Georgia’s campus carry law allows firearms on all public college campuses, minus a few excepted spaces. We hear about the research into the effectiveness of such laws with Matthew Boedy, a Professor of English at the University of North Georgia. Also Mark Rosenberg, former President and CEO of the Task Force for Global Health.

Pixabay / Ben Reiss and Chris Ehlen

This week a group of scientists were awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for their discoveries related to our circadian rhythms. Emory University professor Ben Reiss joined us in May to talk about his latest exploration of sleep patterns, “Wild Nights: How Taming Sleep Created Our Restless World.” We revisit that conversation, then we’re joined in the studio by Assistant Professor of Neuroscience for Morehouse School of Medicine, Chris Ehlen.

On Tuesday, the former head of Atlanta-based Equifax apologized many times during a hearing before a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee  about the company’s massive data breach. The hack exposed more than 145 million people to possible ID theft. We check in with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Tamar Hallerman, who’s been following the Equifax scandal from Washington.

The less money you have, the more careful you are likely to be in spending it. That’s one find in Rachel Schneider’s new book, “The Financial Diaries: How American Families Cope In A World Of Uncertainty.” It follows the lives of low- and middle-income households as they try and manage their money. We sit down with Rachel Schneider to talk about her book, and the personal side of planning. Rachel Schneider will be at Savannah's Armstrong Center on October 12 from 8:30-10 a.m.

Hurricane Maria slammed the entire U.S. territory of Puerto Rico two weeks ago. Maria came hard on the havoc of other storms, leaving the entire island dreadfully damaged, flooded, without basic necessities, and difficulty distributing what they did have, and no electricity. Nearly 90,000 Puerto Ricans live in Georgia, nearly a fourth of them in Cobb and Gwinnett Counties. Cynthia Román-Hernández is a Managing Director with the Latin American Association in Atlanta, and her husband Juan Carlos Rodriguez is an assistant professor at Georgia Tech.

Goldstar

Chicken is the most popular meat in America. And Georgia is the top chicken producer in the nation. Joining us is author, Maryn McKenna. Her book “Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats,” explores the role antibiotics play in transforming our food. 

Georgia has submitted a new plan to hold public schools accountable for student performance. The updates are more lenient on testing. Governor Deal says intense testing is critical to hold schools accountable, but the state Superintendent says we must avoid a “measure, pressure, and punish” culture. We talk with Ty Tagami of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Also Dana Rickman, Director of Policy and Research with the Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education.

In the wake of back-to-back natural disasters, insurance companies are flooded with claims for destroyed property. For many, there's doubt about the willingness and ability of those insurance providers to handle the millions of dollars in damage. We sit down with Carrie Teegardin, an investigative reporter for the Atlanta Journal Constitution, to discuss her reporting as part of our occasional series, “AJC Investigates.” 

In the wake of back-to-back natural disasters, there’s doubt about the willingness and ability of insurance companies to handle a flood of claims for destroyed property. We sit down with an investigative reporter for the Atlanta Journal Constitution, Carrie Teegardin, to discuss her in-depth reporting, part of our occasional series, “AJC Investigates.”  We add two more tunes to our ever-growing Georgia Playlist. Evan Leima is the frontman and singer for Athens-based Dream Culture. They perform at Seeds of Sound Festival in Sparta this Saturday, Sept.

Cat ownership is subject to a lot of debate. Inside or outside, claws or no? We’ll hear how GPB’s Sean Powers comes nose to nose with the conflict, then we talk with Barbara King, an Emerita Professor of Anthropology at the College of William and Mary, about the ethics of cat ownership.

Athens-based band, Drive-by Truckers was co-founded by friends Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley in 1996. We revisit an interview with Patterson Hood about the band’s latest album, “American Band,” before Drive-by Truckers play this Friday, Sept. 29, at Atlanta’s Variety Playhouse.

High Road Touring

Indigo Girls -- no “the” -- have been hits since their first release in 1985. One of the most successful and influential Georgia-formed groups, the folk rock pair have gone platinum and won a Grammy, too. They have a show tonight, Sept. 27, at Atlanta Symphony Hall with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. 

Twillio

Atlanta gets more robocalls than any other city in the United States. If that’s not bad enough, in August the city broke its own record for the number of times mass marketers, pre-recorded commercial pests, pleaders, and politicians annoyed people via phone in one month. On top of that, Hurricane Irma only made this problem worse. Maureen Mahoney, Public Policy Fellow at Consumers Union joins us.

Indigo Girls -- no “the” -- have been hits since their first release in 1985. One of the most successful and influential Georgia-formed groups, the folk rock pair have gone platinum and won a Grammy, too. They have a show tonight, Sept. 27, at Atlanta Symphony Hall with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. We revisit an interview with one half of the group, Amy Ray.

Last week President Trump disparaged professional football players for kneeling during the national anthem. The president’s comments generated gestures of unity at NFL games Sunday. The Atlanta Falcons were among the many players, coaches and owners who locked arms during the anthem to protest racial injustice. Fifty years ago two Olympic athletes brought this kind of silent protest to the medal podium. Track stars Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists during the ceremony.

Georgia Tech student Scout Schultz was shot and killed after provoking campus police officers. Schultz had a history of mental health issues and suicide attempts. Anxiety and depression are common in high pressure schools like Georgia Tech. We talk about the mental health of college students with Tim Elmore, President of Growing Leaders, which works to raise awareness of mental health in young adults. Also joining us is Collin Spencer, External Relations Committee Chair for the Mental Health Student Coalition at Georgia Tech.

Is Atlanta at risk of overcrowding? Last month, The Atlanta Regional Commission reported nearly 80,000 new people in the metro region since just last year -- the highest growth rate since the Great Recession. How this will affect more than your commute, like your rent, and your space to walk down the street, has yet to be seen. We talk with Mike Carnathan, a researcher with the Atlanta Regional Commission, and Chris Leinberger, a business professor at George Washington University.

The South has seen its Hispanic population increase 43 percent between 2007 and 2014, according to the Pew Research Center. The story of the 1996 Olympic Games is key to understanding the Latino boom in Atlanta, and in the South more broadly.

The fallout from the data breach at Atlanta-based Equifax is far and wide. At the end of July, the credit rating company learned it had been hacked, leaving personal information of more than 140 million people exposed. But that revelation wasn’t made public until this month. Now the company is facing a number of lawsuits, investigations, and a massive stock price hit. We talk with Atlanta-Journal Constitution reporter Tamar Hallerman, who has been following this story from Capitol Hill.

It’s time for our regular roundup of movies and television shows currently filming in Georgia. We talk with AJC Buzz Blog writer Jennifer Brett about the new Ant-Man movie, Kevin Hart’s latest comedy, and the much-awaited second season of the FX show "Atlanta."

Wikimedia Commons

A recent study done by the Department of Labor shows that employed Americans spend more time working than on any other activity during the hours they are awake.  Of them, many say they dislike where they work, but few really do love their jobs. The Atlanta Business Chronicle just released its annual list of the best places to work here in the city.  Joining us to talk about the keys to workplace happiness is Tom Conklin, Clinical Associate Professor of Managerial Sciences at Georgia State University.

A recent study done by the Department of Labor shows that employed Americans spend more time working than on any other activity during the hours they are awake.  Of them, many say they dislike where they work, but few really do love their jobs. The Atlanta Business Chronicle just released its annual list of the best places to work here in the city.  Joining us to talk about the keys to workplace happiness is Tom Conklin, Clinical Associate Professor of Managerial Sciences at Georgia State University.

The Breakroom returns to discuss the week’s news, including the success of the horror film “IT” and Harvard admissions. We’ll also talk about Amazon’s new HQ, and the Equifax hack. Joining us in the Breakroom are Hector Fernandez, Tomika DePriest. Stephen Brown, and Christian Zsilavetz.

Pages