Ryan McFadin

Associate Producer - On Second Thought

Ryan McFadin is an associate producer of "On Second Thought." Before joining GPB he worked at WOSU’s "All Sides." Ryan was born in Dallas, Texas, grew up in Lawrenceville, and was a philosophy major at The Ohio State University. In his free time he enjoys music, sports, and the outdoors.

A show featuring producer Trevor Young’s favorite OST segments of 2017. Hosted by Celeste Headlee:

This summer, more than sixty bands flocked to Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta for the fifth annual Shaky Knees Music Festival. Producer Trevor Young caught up with many musicians there, including rocker Ron Gallo. Gallo is best known for his philosophical musings and a care-free attitude. Trevor also spoke with Fantastic Negrito. The soulful artist was the first ever winner of NPR’s Tiny Desk Contest.

If you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on the short-form improvisational comedy show "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" Mochrie has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. We talked with him about his craft.

A show featuring OST’s best music segments of 2017. Hosted by Celeste Headlee:

We talk with singer and songwriter Rhiannon Giddens, who is best known as the lead vocalist for the folk band the Carolina Chocolate Drops. Her new solo album, “Freedom Highway,” tells the stories of oppressed African-Americans. We caught up with her ahead of a performance at the Variety Playhouse in May.

Georgia educators are filing a class-action lawsuit against the state over retirement benefits. The state Department of Community Health changed a law in 2012, effectively reducing the subsidies of any retirees who were in the school system for less than five years. We talk about the controversy with James Salzer, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

#MeToo is not only a movement about sexual harassment. It’s a reckoning for the way we work, and a call to change the power dynamics leading to sexual abuse. We talk with people who dedicate, in different ways, their professional lives to understanding toxic work environments and how to dismantle them. Erica Clemmons is the Georgia State Director for 9 to 5; Marie Mitchell is a professor of management at the University of Georgia’s business school; and Joey Price is the CEO of Jumpstart HR, a human resources consulting firm based in Baltimore.

The Breakroom returns to discuss the art of gift giving and the recent special election in Alabama. We also talk about the biggest lies of the year, going to the moon, and bad grammar. Joining us this week are Steve Brown, Ed Sohn, Soumaya Khalifa, and Eric Segall.

The list of nicknames and titles for filmmaker John Waters is long and legend. Waters is more than a filmmaker. He’s an actor, writer, fashion icon, stand-up comedian and art collector. He performs in Atlanta on Friday with his one-man show, “A John Waters Christmas.” We get his take on the holiday season.

Thomas Hicks was once a local hero in the small mining community of McCaysville, Georgia. He was the town doctor who made middle-of-the-night house calls. But Hicks had a terrible secret, one still reverberating today. From 1950 to 1965, he sold more than two hundred babies on the black market. Some parents knew, others were told their children had died. These children are now fully grown adults, still known as the “Hicks Babies.” We talk to Melinda Dawson and Kriste Hughes about their search for birth parents. 

Photographer Alison Wright has seen a lot of places. She’s trekked through Africa, to South America, to Asia, with many stops along the way: 150 countries in all. She has one goal: Documenting the human condition, one photograph at a time. Her new book, "Human Tribe," is a selection from those thousands of photographs, all showing our shared humanity.

Slate

If you’ve ever visited any Reddit message board or YouTube comment section, you know internet trolls and hate speech go hand in hand. A new study from Georgia Tech suggests the most effective way of combating internet hate speech is to eliminate the spaces where it occurs, not the trolls individually. We talk with Georgia Tech Assistant Professor Jacob Eisenstein.

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