Ryan McFadin

Associate Producer - On Second Thought

Ryan McFadin is an associate producer of "On Second Thought." Before joining GPB he worked at WOSU’s "All Sides." Ryan was born in Dallas, Texas, grew up in Lawrenceville, and was a philosophy major at The Ohio State University. In his free time he enjoys music, sports, and the outdoors.

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A recent survey by the University of Georgia finds that 16 percent of Georgians don’t have access to a high-speed internet connection. The vast majority of those effected live in the state’s rural regions. We talk about broadband deserts with UGA’s Associate Director of the Carl Vinson Institute of Government Eric McRae.

Finally, broadband deserts are a political issue as well. Kyle Wingfield, a conservative columnist for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, brings us a commentary.

First, according to a recent lawsuit, hundreds of students at Worth County High School in Sylvester, Georgia were the subject of a humiliating pat-down by local sheriff's deputies. The case raises questions about privacy on school campuses. We speak with Robyn McDougle of the Commonwealth Educational Policy Institute.

First, walking might be good for your health, but maybe not so good for your safety. Last year, 236 pedestrians were killed in Georgia. That’s a 40 percent increase in just two years. We discuss this with Sally Flocks, President and CEO of PEDS, which advocates for pedestrian safety in Georgia.

First, retail stores are disappearing, but the economy’s not the bad guy. Rising pressure from online shopping is causing brick and mortar stores to file for bankruptcy at a record pace in 2017. We’ll talk about how this retail downturn is affecting Georgia with Amy Wenk, reporter for The Atlanta Business Chronicle, and John Brown, Associate Professor of Economics at Georgia Southern University.

John Englart (Takver)/ Foter

Climate change is a problem for everyone. But climate change disproportionately harms communities of color. An Atlanta-based organization recently received $1 million from the MacArthur Foundation to help combat this. Nathaniel Smith is a founder of that organization, the Partnership for Southern Equity. He joins us with Felicia Davis, Director of the Building Green Initiative at Clark Atlanta University.

First, June 20 is World Refugee Day. The town of Clarkston, Georgia, is home to a large refugee population. It’s been called the Ellis Island of the South. We talked with Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry about how executive orders may impact the refugee community there. Then, two refugee friends from Syria share their stories. One of them arrived in Georgia right after 9/11, but before the Syrian civil war. The other is a young child, who came to the state last year. Besides calling Syria their birthplace, they share an even greater bond.

Up first, when you go into a hair salon or a cosmetics store, how much do you know about the products used on your skin or your hair? A recent study says there are dangerous chemicals in some of these products, particularly those marketed to black women. That study comes from the non-profit Environmental Working Group. Nneka Leiba is the group’s Deputy Director of Research.  She joins us with journalist A'Lelia Bundles and Atlanta hair stylist Latasha Gray.

One year ago, Atlanta-based Rapper Gucci Mane was released from prison. Since his release, he has been reinventing himself. He headlines a concert this weekend in Atlanta. We speak with Georgia-based hip-hop artist Makonnen and hip-hop scholar Regina Bradley about Gucci Mane’s influence on hip-hop in the South. Then, NPR Music hip-hop reporter Rodney Carmichael reviews Gucci Mane’s latest album, "Droptopwop."

As the race for a single congressional district draws national attention, we take an hour to examine Georgia’s changing electorate.

First, Cobb County is the last metro county in Georgia with a white majority. But it’s expected to become "majority minority"—more than 50 percent non-white residents—in the next four years. Politically, the reliably Republican county is shifting to largely Democratic, and may flip in the upcoming 6th Congressional District election. We talk about the changing electorate in Cobb with Andra Gillespie, Political Science Professor at Emory University.

ATOMIC Hot Links / Foter

The Atlantic is rising. Georgia’s sea level is expected to be six feet higher by the end of the century. The drastic change puts Savannah at risk of losing nearly 60,000 residents. It is predicted that many of those displaced will relocate to Atlanta. We talk with UGA Demographer Matt Hauer about the findings of a recent study, and Todd Holloway, a Savannah-based planning consultant.