Ryan McFadin

Associate Producer - On Second Thought

Ryan McFadin is an associate producer of "On Second Thought." Before joining GPB he worked at WOSU’s "All Sides." Ryan was born in Dallas, Texas, grew up in Lawrenceville, and was a philosophy major at The Ohio State University. In his free time he enjoys music, sports, and the outdoors.

Comedian Jim Gaffigan has appeared in “That 70s Show,” “Fargo,” “Bob’s Burgers,” and many times on “Law and Order.” But he may be best known for his stand-up comedy specials, and two seasons of "The Jim Gaffigan Show." We catch up with him ahead of a live show in Atlanta this weekend.

On Tuesday Atlantans voted for a new mayor and other important city positions. We analyze election day results with Andra Gillespie, Professor of Political Science at Emory University. And Greg Bluestein, Political Reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Three former sheriff’s deputies in Washington County, Georgia face murder charges. A man they tased this summer died. The incident was captured on video. We talk with GPB’s Grant Blankenship, who is following the case.

Many of Georgia’s historic theaters need repairs. This month, the Atlanta-based Fox Theatre Institute gave $85,000, shared by four theaters, for historic preservation. One recipient is Rome’s DeSoto Theatre. We learn about that theater’s legacy from Rome resident Tommy Lam, whose grandfather started the DeSoto.

Emory.edu

Some 111 years ago, a brutal race riot broke out in Atlanta. A foreign observer wrote a novel about what he saw in 1906. A new translation of that work sheds light on the largely forgotten events. First published in German in 1922, “The Blue Stain,” tells the story of a German man whose trip abroad culminates in a violent version of Atlanta. Emory Professor of German Studies, Peter Hoyng joins us in studio to talk about finding and translating the novel. 

Democrats lost big in 2016. But this year, progressive candidates in the South begin to win state and local races. Birmingham, Alabama recently joined the list of Southeastern cities electing left-leaning, African-American candidates. Senator Bernie Sanders personally endorsed Birmingham’s new Mayor-elect Randall Woodfin. Woodfin beat a two-term Democratic incumbent in a runoff election last month. We talk with Woodfin about his campaign, and his plans for Birmingham.

Next Tuesday, Atlanta voters will pick a new mayor. With nine candidates vying for office, campaign fundraising and robocalls have played a major role in the race. That’s been a hot-button issue as the feds investigate pay-to-play contracts at city hall.  A joint investigation by the Atlanta Journal Constitution and Georgia News Lab examines the flow of money from city contractors to the campaigns. We talk with AJC reporter Dan Klepal and Georgia News Lab reporter Ryan Basden.

The Breakroom returns to discuss the upcoming implosion of the Georgia Dome and the indictment of Paul Manafort. We also talk about one school’s Civil War reenactment, why some of us are not getting enough sleep, and the allegations of sexual assault against Kevin Spacey. Joining us this week are Tomika DePriest, Ed Sohn, Simon Bloom, and London Brown.

Atlanta is among many American cities making an aggressive bid for Amazon’s second headquarters. The Georgia city of Stonecrest even offered to de-annex some land and name it Amazon. The company’s first HQ is in Seattle, Washington. And Seattle has some wisdom to share with other cities who might want to attract the retail giant. A new podcast is called “Prime(d): What Happens When Amazon Comes to Your Town?” It’s produced by KUOW, Puget Sound Public Radio. Reporter Joshua McNichols joins us.

Chris Ballard / GPB

We’ve been talking about guns in the South.  GPB’s Ryan McFadin visited a shooting range in Milledgeville Georgia to speak with law enforcement firearms instructor and gun hobbyist, Joe Grant. They talked about what it means to be a responsible gun enthusiast, and got in some target practice.

The terms “alt-right,” “far-right,” and “radical right” get thrown around a lot these days. But there’s actually very little research on what those terms mean and who the people are identifying with them. Cas Mudde, Professor in the Department of International Affairs at UGA, is looking to change that. His new book is “The Far-Right in America.” He joins us to analyze the movement and its many subsets.

A full hour of tricks and treats and from the On Second Thought crew.

 

Georgia native Karin Slaughter has written several international bestsellers and they are not for the faint of heart. These are complicated, tough, and realistic thrillers. Her latest is “The Good Daughter.”  It’s about a terrifying event that rips apart a family and the small town where they live. We spoke with Karin Slaughter about revealing the dark side of Georgia’s small town life.

An Atlanta attorney accused of murder says it was a tragic accident.  The prosecutor says Tex McIver knew what he was doing when he shot his wife, Diane McIver. The case is explored in this season’s “Breakdown” podcast, produced by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. It premiered earlier this month. AJC reporter Bill Rankin joins us in the studio.

 

Atlanta is officially a soccer town. In its first season, Atlanta United broke MLS attendance records and made the playoffs. The team plays its first postseason game at Mercedes-Benz Stadium Thursday night against the Columbus Crew. We talked with AU President Darren Eales about Georgia’s growing passion for what the rest of the world calls football.

A special hour about guns in the South: the people who own them, the emotions they stir, how they’re bought and sold, the total cost of gun violence, and the history of laws controlling who has access to them.

Savannah’s Owens-Thomas House was recently awarded $250,000 by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The money will continue renovations and reinterpretations of the property’s museum. We talk with Daina Berry, Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas. Berry has authored and edited a number of books on slavery in the South. We also talk to Leslie Harris, Professor of History at Northwestern University. Harris and Berry co-edited “Slavery and Freedom in Savannah.”

For most of us, our idea of politics is influenced by what we see on TV. Millions of Americans regularly watch shows like “The West Wing,” “Veep,” and “House of Cards." Georgia native Jay Carson worked as supervising producer and political consultant for Netflix’s “House of Cards.” We talk with him about how to write engaging political drama in 2017, and how much the fictional White House resembles the real one.

This year a federal court in Chicago ruled for the first time that workers can’t be fired based on sexual orientation, extending workplace protections in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to the LGBT community. Yet, a Georgia judge ruled against a similar case. Now that case is up for appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. Jameka Evans claims Georgia Regional Hospital in Savannah fired her for being a lesbian. Earlier this month, 18 state attorneys general filed briefs in support of Evans's petition.

Imagine being in outer space with two sassy robots, and being forced to watch really bad science fiction movies with them. That’s the premise of the cult classic TV series, “Mystery Science Theater 3000.” The show got a reboot on Netflix this summer. We talk with series creator Joel Hodgson.

"On Second Thought" is celebrating its third anniversary this week. The show launched its first broadcast on GPB on October 20, 2014. To celebrate three amazing years, we’re re-airing our best segments in a two part broadcast. Here are the best picks for today:

This week "On Second Thought" celebrates three years on the air. The show launched October 20, 2014. To celebrate, we’re re-airing a few of our best segments. Do you have a favorite segment or episode? Let us know.

Actor George Takei first came to fame as a young Sulu in the original Star Trek series. But he’s since become an active voice in promoting equal rights for LGBT people. We spoke to Takei earlier this year when the play “Allegiance,” was showing in Atlanta movie theaters. The play is inspired by Takei’s experiences in a U.S. internment camp during World War II.

A new novel by Atlanta-based author Nic Stone explores police violence against people of color through the eyes of a teenage boy. He tries to make sense of contemporary racism using the teachings of Martin Luther King Jr., asking if those teachings still hold up. “Dear Martin” is out today, Oct. 17. The book launches with an event tonight at The National Center for Human and Civil Rights in Atlanta. Author Nic Stone joins us live in the studio.

Earlier this month the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments that could change how Georgia lawmakers draw districts for Congress and state legislative seats. The case hinges on allegations of gerrymandering in two Georgia districts. Plaintiffs claim these districts were redrawn to discriminate against black voters, and create an advantage for Republicans. We break down what gerrymandering really is, and the incredible impact it has on the nation.

We continue our coverage of gerrymandering in Georgia with Kennesaw State’s Kerwin Swint, a political science professor.

Musical acts from all over the world come to Atlanta this weekend for the Afropunk Music Festival. One group performing is Georgia’s own, Algiers. Their latest album is called “The Underside of Power.” GPB’s Sean Powers catches up with lead singer, Franklin James Fisher.

The winners of this year’s Nobel Prizes were announced last week. Last month, slightly less prestigious awards honored the funny side of scientific discovery. The Ig Nobel Prizes have been awarded annually since 1991 to honor achievements that “first make people laugh, and then make them think.” We talk about silly science with Marc Abraham, an organizer and founder of the Ig Nobel Prizes. Also with us is Georgia Tech doctoral student Patricia Yang, who won an Ig Nobel Prize in 2015.

He might be Georgia’s second best known politician. And perhaps its most polarizing. Bestselling author Craig Shirley sits down with us to talk about his latest book, “Citizen Newt.” It follows the career of Newt Gingrich. Emory professor of History, Joe Crespino also joins us to help breakdown key moments of Gingrich's political life.

Animal Legal Defence Fund

Two major puppy mill were busted in Georgia this year. One in April rescued more than 350 animals. Last month in Fulton County, authorities found 60 dogs, 53 lizards, a rabbit and a piranha at another site. We talk with Jessica Rock, Founding Partner at Animal Law Source.

Two major puppy mill were busted in Georgia this year. One in April rescued more than 350 animals. Last month in Fulton County, authorities found 60 dogs, 53 lizards, a rabbit and a piranha at another site. We talk with Jessica Rock, Founding Partner at Animal Law Source.

The Breakroom returns! We discuss robot chefs, Amazon’s new HQ, and Nintendo brining back some 16 bit magic. We also examine Trump's handling of Puerto Rico, middle fingers, and gun laws, or lack thereof… Joining us this week are Kathy Lohr, Hector Fernandez, Christian Zsilavetz, and Greg Williams.

On Monday, the Atlanta City Council voted unanimously to weaken punishments for the possession of marijuana. Now, those caught with an ounce or less will not serve jail time, and will be fined no more than $75. We talk about this monumental move with Andrea Young, Executive Director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia. 

Georgia’s campus carry law allows firearms on all public college campuses, minus a few excepted spaces. We hear about the research into the effectiveness of such laws with Matthew Boedy, a Professor of English at the University of North Georgia. Also Mark Rosenberg, former President and CEO of the Task Force for Global Health.

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