Ryan McFadin

Associate Producer - On Second Thought

Ryan McFadin is an associate producer of "On Second Thought." Before joining GPB he worked at WOSU’s "All Sides." Ryan was born in Dallas, Texas, grew up in Lawrenceville, and was a philosophy major at The Ohio State University. In his free time he enjoys music, sports, and the outdoors.

A record number of guns were confiscated this year at Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. Though that follows a national trend, the Atlanta airport led the nation in the number of guns found for another year. We discuss this with Kelly Yamanouchi, a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution who focuses on airport-related stories. Tom Barton, a Georgia Criminal Defense Lawyer, also joins us. 

Last month, Moody’s Investors Service issued a stern warning to states: address climate change or risk a credit downgrade. That report says Georgia is one of a handful of coastal states facing the highest risk from climate change. We talk with climate change reporter Christopher Flavelle of Bloomberg News and Jennette Gayer of Environment Georgia.

The Trump Administration’s immigration crackdown has led to an uptick in arrests nationwide. New federal data show arrests in Georgia and the Carolinas are also up from the last fiscal year. The president’s push to be tough on illegal immigration also includes policies to build a massive wall at the U.S.-Mexico border. Historian Kenneth C. Davis explains that anti-immigrant sentiment is older than America itself.

Georgia’s Secretary of State is in charge of its voting system. And it’s an elected office. So the person who oversees fair elections, also runs as a candidate. Is this an inherent conflict of interest? Secretary of State Brian Kemp has been accused by some of using his position to help Republicans win elections. Now, Kemp is running in the Republican primary for governor. We talk with Robert Howard, Executive Director of the Southern Political Science Association.


"Happy birthday!" to one of Georgia’s most iconic musicians. Little Richard was born in Macon on December 5, 1932. He grew up singing gospel in the Pentecostal church. His big break came in September of 1955, when he recorded “Tutti Fruitti.” His style influenced countless musicians, including Kate Pierson of the B-52s. She recently nominated “Tutti Fruitti” for our Georgia Playlist. We’ll hear why it tops her list of essential Georgia listening.

New FBI data show an uptick in reported hate crimes. Nationwide, 2016 saw more than 6,100 incidents, up by more than 270 from  the year before. Georgia reported a drop in hate crimes during that period. But a recent ProPublica investigation finds many police departments, including those in Georgia, aren’t trained to identify and investigate hate crimes. This could lead to underreporting. We talk with ProPublica’s A.C. Thompson.


If you want to pass out meals to homeless people in Atlanta, you'll now need a permit. City police have begun enforcing a decades-old policy requiring one to distribute food to homeless people. Those who don't comply face fines. We sit down to discuss this policy with Deidre Oakley, Professor of Sociology at Georgia State University, and George Chidi, Social Impact Director for Central Atlanta Progress.

Churches in the United States are barred from endorsing political candidates, or contributing to campaigns. This part of our tax code is known as the Johnson Amendment. It includes all non-profit organizations. But Republicans, including President Trump, want to repeal the amendment as part of a federal tax overhaul happening now. We talk about politics from the pulpit with researcher Matthew Boedy, an assistant professor at the University of North Georgia. And we discuss how taxes change behavior with Susan Anderson,  an accounting professor at Elon University in North Carolina.

Sometimes the best way to make sense of what’s happening in the world is through comedy. And for that, “The Daily Show” on Comedy Central has you covered. We chat with comedian Roy Wood, Jr., who’s a correspondent for “The Daily Show.” He’s in Atlanta this weekend with performances at the Punchline Comedy Club.

An investigative report from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution finds about 12 percent of cops in Georgia schools were forced out of a previous job. The officers were terminated or investigated for a wide range of reasons, including chronically poor performance, lying to superiors, sexual misconduct and inappropriate use of force. But for some, jobs in the school system means a second chance for these troubled cops. We talk with Brad Schrade, reporter for the AJC.