Ryan McFadin

Associate Producer - On Second Thought

Ryan McFadin is an associate producer of "On Second Thought." Before joining GPB he worked at WOSU’s "All Sides." Ryan was born in Dallas, Texas, grew up in Lawrenceville, and was a philosophy major at The Ohio State University. In his free time he enjoys music, sports, and the outdoors.

In the Breakroom this week we’ll talk about microchips, atheists, and disgruntled Google employees. Plus, we’ll discuss the ethics of getting an A for effort. Joining us this week: Kathy Lohr, Christian Zsilavetz, Amy Condon, and Steve Brown.

First, if you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on TV’s “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” and he has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. Audiences in Atlanta can see him live Friday, August 11, and tomorrow August 12 at Dad’s Garage. We talk with Colin Mochrie.

First, imagine being in outer space with two sassy robots, and being forced to watch really bad science fiction movies with them. That’s the premise of the cult classic TV series, Mystery Science Theater 3000. The show is on the road this weekend [August 12] in Atlanta. We talk with series creator, Joel Hodgson.

Sportsgrid

The Savannah Bananas are back in the playoffs this week. This comes after Savannah’s collegiate team broke the league record for attendance, again. We talk with team president, Jared Orton. Then, we hear from some number one fans. 

The Savannah Bananas are back in the playoffs this week. This comes after Savannah’s collegiate team broke the league record for attendance, again. We talk with team president, Jared Orton. Then, we hear from some number one fans.

The personal finance site Nerd Wallet says Atlanta is the nation’s best place for African-American-owned businesses. Savannah and Columbus scored high marks as well. We spoke with Cindy Yang from NerdWallet.

First, for years, we’ve seen gorillas come to life on the screen, in everything from “Planet of the Apes,” to “Congo,” and “The Jungle Book.” But these cinematic portrayals aren’t all that accurate. University of Georgia anthropology professor Roberta Salmi is on a mission to change Hollywood’s depiction of gorillas. We talk with her about studying their behavior, and working as a consultant on the new film, “War for the Planet of the Apes.”

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Blue Cross Blue Shield is currently the only insurer on Georgia’s statewide exchange, and its premiums are set to go up as much as 40 percent by 2018. The insurer just announced a new policy limiting consumer coverage when it comes to emergency room visits. We talk with Andy Miller, editor of Georgia Health News, and Beth Stephens, Senior Director of Public Policy, Georgia Watch.

First, August 7th marks 50 years since Jackson County DA Floyd Hoard was murdered. He was one of the first government prosecutors murdered in the line of the duty in the United States. The event changed the course of law enforcement and politics in Jackson County and led to then-Governor Maddox giving the Georgia Bureau of Investigation jurisdiction in Jackson County. Floyd Hoard's son, Richard Hoard, wrote a book about his father's murder a few years ago.

In the Breakroom this week we talk about tuna salad, blocking people on Twitter, and the science of manspreading. Plus, we say our goodbyes to The Mooch. Joining us this week: Tomika DePriest, Greg Williams, Hector Fernandez, and Soumaya Khalifa.

First, the average cost of college tuition has jumped by 77 percent over the last 10 years. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is collaborating with The Hechinger Report in New York to determine the consequences of rising student debt. The first in a series of investigative articles will roll out this Sunday. We talk to Meredith Kolodner, Staff Writer for The Hechinger Report.

First, as natural predators of insects, bats are extremely important to agriculture. Researchers estimate their value to farmers in the U.S. is roughly $23 billion per year, but these are tough times for bats. A malignant fungus known as "white-nose syndrome" has killed a lot of bats over the past 10 years. We talk about this menace with wildlife pathologist Heather Fenton of the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study and Georgia State University microbiologist Chris Cornelison.

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Our producers are fed up with bad drivers. Senior Producer Emily Cureton and Producer Ryan McFadin take two-wheeled alternatives to work, and they’ve got some beef to share with motorists on the road. It’s time to open up the Gripe Bag.

Sweetwater Mission

Sweetwater Mission is Atlanta’s largest food pantry, and it focuses on the city’s undocumented workers. Managers at the mission say they recently turned down $35,000 of funding because it came with the stipulation that it should only be used to serve people who are in the country legally. Joining us is the Director of Operations for Sweetwater Mission, Mark Zangari.

First, Sweetwater Mission is Atlanta’s largest food pantry, and it focuses on the city’s undocumented workers. Managers at the mission say they recently turned down $35,000 of funding because it came with the stipulation that it should only be used to serve people who are in the country legally. Joining us is the Director of Operations for Sweetwater Mission, Mark Zangari, and Solveig Cunningham professor at the Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University.

Ryan McFadin

Savannah’s First African Baptist Church was recently honored by the Georgia Historical Society for its role in the civil rights movement -- from housing escaped slaves under their floorboards, to being the place where Martin Luther King Jr. gave his first public speech. GPB’s Ryan McFadin recently went to the church service and brought back this audio postcard.

Amazon

"Atlanta Noir," a new collection of short stories comes out today. The book depicts neighborhoods in the city using grim and moody devices typical of the noir genre. Joining us to talk about the dark sides of Atlanta is Tayari Jones, editor and contributing author of the new book.

First, the number of high-poverty neighborhoods in the metro Atlanta area tripled between 2000 and 2015. That’s according to a new Harvard study, which finds poverty is largely moving to the suburbs surrounding the city. We talk about this with Kim Addie, Senior Director of Health for United Way of Atlanta. Michael Rich, a Professor in the Department of Political Science at Emory University, also joins us.

Yeshiva

50,000 Fulton County voters received letters saying they may be declared inactive, because they didn’t update the address on their voter registration cards. The Georgia ACLU is filing legal action against the state, claiming it’s actions are in violation of the Voter Registration Act of 1993. But is this simple housekeeping for an elections system, or part of an effort to make it harder for some people to vote? Joining us is Andra Gillespie, Emory University Political Science Professor.

First, 50,000 Fulton County voters received letters saying they may be declared inactive, because they didn’t update the address on their voter registration cards. The Georgia ACLU is threatening legal action against the state, claiming it’s actions are in violation of the Voter Registration Act of 1993. But is this simple housekeeping for an elections system, or part of an effort to make it harder for some people to vote? Joining us is Andra Gillespie, Emory University Political Science Professor.

Don Smith / GPB

Macon, Georgia has a rich heritage, once home to great musicians like The Allman Brothers, Little Richard, and Otis Redding. The Douglass Theatre in Macon helped to launch the career of Redding and countless other musicians of color. In celebration of Bragg Jam, "On Second Thought" taps into that history, joined at the Douglass by local guests making strides in Macon.

First, a recent report puts Georgia 41st in the nation for its quality of senior health. According to America’s Health Rankings Senior Report, that’s two slots lower than last year. We talk about senior health in the state with Kathy Floyd of the Georgia Council on Aging and Glenn Osster of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Georgia.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control shows that 30 million Americans -- nearly 10 percent of the population -- have diabetes. The study also shows nearly a quarter of them -- more than seven million -- are undiagnosed. And the South, Georgia included, has the highest concentration of people with the disease. We talk with Sarah Piper, Senior Program Associate for the Diabetes Training and Technical Assistance Center at Emory University and Andy Miller, President of Georgia Health News.

First, a new report from the Centers for Disease Control shows that 30 million Americans -- nearly 10 percent of the population -- have diabetes. The study also shows nearly a quarter of them -- more than seven million -- are undiagnosed. And the South, Georgia included, has the highest concentration of people with the disease. We talk with Sarah Piper, Senior Program Associate for the Diabetes Training and Technical Assistance Center at Emory University and Andy Miller, President of Georgia Health News.

First, the fate of the police department in the small town of Varnell in Whitfield County is suddenly uncertain. Earlier this month, the city council voted to eliminate the department because of costs, with little warning. The mayor ultimately vetoed that move, but the council could override that veto on Tuesday. We talk with reporter Chris Whitfield, who has been covering this story for The Daily Citizen in Dalton.

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The Atlanta City Council, along with the United Way, has committed $50 million  to help combat homelessness. This comes after news that the city’s largest shelter, Peachtree-Pine, will close by the end of August. Joining us is Rick Westbrook, Executive Director for Lost N Found, and Deirdre Oakley, Professor of Sociology for Georgia State University. 

First, the Atlanta City Council, along with the United Way, has committed $50 million  to help combat homelessness. This comes after news that the city’s largest shelter, Peachtree-Pine, will close by the end of August. Joining us is Rick Westbrook, Executive Director for Lost N Found, and Deirdre Oakley, Professor of Sociology for Georgia State University.

In the Breakroom this week we talk about snortable chocolate, horrible wedding playlists, and the inadequacies of Tyrannosaurus Rex. Plus, we’ll discuss the nixing of this year’s tax holiday and Ann Coulter’s latest twitter tirade. Joining us this week: Ruel Joyner, Amber Scott, Kathy Lohr, and Jessica Szilagyi.

First, another round of allegations have surfaced against musician R. Kelly. Now, parents have claimed their daughters are being held captive by the hip-hop musician, living in homes he rents out in Atlanta and Chicago, with almost every aspect of their lives controlled. R. Kelly publicly denies these allegations. Jim DeRogatis broke the story earlier this week. He’s a Buzzfeed contributor, host of WBEZ’s "Sound Opinions," and our guest.

First, one of the first African-American elementary schools in Atlanta was recently slated for destruction. But after outcry a piece of the structure was saved, to become part of a new YMCA center in Vine City. This is just one fight in a perennial battle over historic preservation. A recent National Trust for Historic Preservation study says Atlanta has a  teardown culture -- worse than just about about any other major American city. We talk about this with Sheffield Hale, President of the Atlanta History Center. And with Mtamanika Youngblood, President of Sweet Auburn Works.

We talk with actor Tony Hale, best known for roles on "Veep" and "Arrested Development." He stars in the movie, "Brave New Jersey." It’s showing at this week’s Macon Film Festival, July 20-23.

Then, 21 years have passed since Atlanta became an Olympic city. The games were transformative. For a look back, we re-visit a conversation we had with former NPR correspondent Kathy Lohr and Georgia State University professor Maurice Hobson.

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