Ryan McFadin

Associate Producer - On Second Thought

Ryan McFadin is an associate producer of "On Second Thought." Before joining GPB he worked at WOSU’s "All Sides." Ryan was born in Dallas, Texas, grew up in Lawrenceville, and was a philosophy major at The Ohio State University. In his free time he enjoys music, sports, and the outdoors.

First, 50,000 Fulton County voters received letters saying they may be declared inactive, because they didn’t update the address on their voter registration cards. The Georgia ACLU is threatening legal action against the state, claiming it’s actions are in violation of the Voter Registration Act of 1993. But is this simple housekeeping for an elections system, or part of an effort to make it harder for some people to vote? Joining us is Andra Gillespie, Emory University Political Science Professor.

Don Smith / GPB

Macon, Georgia has a rich heritage, once home to great musicians like The Allman Brothers, Little Richard, and Otis Redding. The Douglass Theatre in Macon helped to launch the career of Redding and countless other musicians of color. In celebration on Bragg Jam, "On Second Thought" taps into that history, joined at the Douglass by local guests making strides in Macon.

First, a recent report puts Georgia 41st in the nation for its quality of senior health. According to America’s Health Rankings Senior Report, that’s two slots lower than last year. We talk about senior health in the state with Kathy Floyd of the Georgia Council on Aging and Glenn Osster of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Georgia.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control shows that 30 million Americans -- nearly 10 percent of the population -- have diabetes. The study also shows nearly a quarter of them -- more than seven million -- are undiagnosed. And the South, Georgia included, has the highest concentration of people with the disease. We talk with Sarah Piper, Senior Program Associate for the Diabetes Training and Technical Assistance Center at Emory University and Andy Miller, President of Georgia Health News.

First, a new report from the Centers for Disease Control shows that 30 million Americans -- nearly 10 percent of the population -- have diabetes. The study also shows nearly a quarter of them -- more than seven million -- are undiagnosed. And the South, Georgia included, has the highest concentration of people with the disease. We talk with Sarah Piper, Senior Program Associate for the Diabetes Training and Technical Assistance Center at Emory University and Andy Miller, President of Georgia Health News.

First, the fate of the police department in the small town of Varnell in Whitfield County is suddenly uncertain. Earlier this month, the city council voted to eliminate the department because of costs, with little warning. The mayor ultimately vetoed that move, but the council could override that veto on Tuesday. We talk with reporter Chris Whitfield, who has been covering this story for The Daily Citizen in Dalton.

Wikimedia Commons

The Atlanta City Council, along with the United Way, has committed $50 million  to help combat homelessness. This comes after news that the city’s largest shelter, Peachtree-Pine, will close by the end of August. Joining us is Rick Westbrook, Executive Director for Lost N Found, and Deirdre Oakley, Professor of Sociology for Georgia State University. 

First, the Atlanta City Council, along with the United Way, has committed $50 million  to help combat homelessness. This comes after news that the city’s largest shelter, Peachtree-Pine, will close by the end of August. Joining us is Rick Westbrook, Executive Director for Lost N Found, and Deirdre Oakley, Professor of Sociology for Georgia State University.

In the Breakroom this week we talk about snortable chocolate, horrible wedding playlists, and the inadequacies of Tyrannosaurus Rex. Plus, we’ll discuss the nixing of this year’s tax holiday and Ann Coulter’s latest twitter tirade. Joining us this week: Ruel Joyner, Amber Scott, Kathy Lohr, and Jessica Szilagyi.

First, another round of allegations have surfaced against musician R. Kelly. Now, parents have claimed their daughters are being held captive by the hip-hop musician, living in homes he rents out in Atlanta and Chicago, with almost every aspect of their lives controlled. R. Kelly publicly denies these allegations. Jim DeRogatis broke the story earlier this week. He’s a Buzzfeed contributor, host of WBEZ’s "Sound Opinions," and our guest.

First, one of the first African-American elementary schools in Atlanta was recently slated for destruction. But after outcry a piece of the structure was saved, to become part of a new YMCA center in Vine City. This is just one fight in a perennial battle over historic preservation. A recent National Trust for Historic Preservation study says Atlanta has a  teardown culture -- worse than just about about any other major American city. We talk about this with Sheffield Hale, President of the Atlanta History Center. And with Mtamanika Youngblood, President of Sweet Auburn Works.

We talk with actor Tony Hale, best known for roles on "Veep" and "Arrested Development." He stars in the movie, "Brave New Jersey." It’s showing at this week’s Macon Film Festival, July 20-23.

Then, 21 years have passed since Atlanta became an Olympic city. The games were transformative. For a look back, we re-visit a conversation we had with former NPR correspondent Kathy Lohr and Georgia State University professor Maurice Hobson.

Pixabay

Travel journalist Arthur Levine joins us to discuss roller coaster history, and the appeal of getting your kicks on a ride.  

Flickr

Six Flags just announced its historic wooden rollercoaster, The Georgia Cyclone, will be closed by the end of July. The park turned 50 this year, and a lot has changed since it opened. GPB producers Ryan McFadin and Sean Powers bring us an audio postcard from Six Flags.

Federal prosecutors are investigating bribes paid to Atlanta city officials in exchange for business contracts. Two contractors have already plead guilty to dishing out these bribes--though it is not clear who accepted them. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has exclusive new info on the situation. We talk with reporter Scott Trubey, who has been covering the bribery scandal at City Hall.

Then, Kaleb Anderson is a 19 year-old-from Atlanta. He was diagnosed with HIV just a couple of months before starting college. He shares his story in a commentary.

A report released last month provides a grim picture on the effects of gun violence on children. Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta found nearly 1,300 children in the United States die in shootings each year. That makes gunshot wounds the third leading cause of death for children up to the age of 17. We talk with Atlanta-based trauma surgeon Omar Danner, who worked on a separate report about the victims of gun violence admitted to Grady Hospital.

www.killertomatofest.com

The Killer Tomato is coming this weekend. The Killer Tomato Festival, that is. Atlanta restaurateur and chef Ford Fry and Georgia Organics Director Alice Rolls join us to talk about southern cooking with juicy, ripe tomatoes.

The Killer Tomato is this coming weekend. The Killer Tomato Festival, that is. Atlanta restaurateur and chef Ford Fry and Georgia Organics Director Alice Rolls join us to talk about southern cooking with juicy, ripe tomatoes. Then, Bitter Southerner editor-in-chief Chuck Reece provides his views on how to construct the perfect tomato sandwich.

First, last week, Georgia’s public health commissioner was named as the new head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention here in Atlanta. Brenda Fitzgerald was chosen by Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, a former Georgia congressman. The last permanent director of the CDC was Tom Frieden, who was appointed by President Obama in 2009. We re-visit our conversation with Frieden, who talked about his work with the CDC, and what he hopes to see happen there in the future.

First, the battle for voter data is reaching a tipping point in Georgia. Last week, a lawsuit filed in Fulton County Superior Court seeks to overturn the results of the 6th District congressional election, alleging a voter data breach at an election center at Kennesaw State University influenced the outcome. And a new restraining order is looking to bar President Trump from obtaining voter information in Georgia. We talk about these issues with Kristina Torres, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Other Press

On this day in 1773, the first Jewish settlers arrived in Savannah. They founded what has become the oldest Jewish congregation in the South. Nearly two centuries later, Savannah again became a refuge for Jewish immigrants. Author Jonathan Rabb explores this difficult transition in his novel, "Among The Living.” We talk to him about the book, and researching Jewish communities in Georgia. 

A recent study by the Natural Resources Defense Council shows Georgia leads most states in drinking water violations. Most happen in rural areas. We talk about the findings with Erik Olson, the NRDC’s health program director.

Then, 40 years ago President Jimmy Carter posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom to Dr.  Martin Luther King, Jr. The civil rights icon had died about a decade earlier. Our producer Sean Powers takes us back to the day MLK was honored at the White House with this audio postcard.

Wikipedia

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a case against the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, alleging the company discriminates against older workers by not hiring them in the first place. This leaves in place a ruling from Atlanta’s 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. We discuss the implications with Paul Chichester, an Atlanta-based employment attorney. And Peter Gosselin, contributing reporter for ProPublica.

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a case against the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, alleging the company discriminates against older workers by not hiring them in the first place. This leaves in place a ruling from Atlanta’s 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. We discuss the implications with Paul Chichester, an Atlanta-based employment attorney. And Peter Gosselin, contributing reporter for ProPublica.

Flickr

President Trump has created a commission to investigate voter fraud. Most states are refusing to hand over their registration records. But Georgia’s leadership has agreed to release extensive personal information about voters here. Blogger Sam Burnham takes issue with this. He brings us this commentary.

Flickr

Sucheta Rawal is a children’s book author on a mission. She created Beato, a world traveling cat, who’s part of a broader plan to raise cultural awareness in both kids and adults.  Her latest book is “Beato Goes to Indonesia,” which just hit the shelves. The author joins us in the studio.

First, Sucheta Rawal is a children’s book author on a mission. She created Beato, a world traveling cat, who’s part of a broader plan to raise cultural awareness in both kids and adults. Her latest book is “Beato Goes to Indonesia,” which just hit the shelves. The author joins us in the studio.

In recent years, newspapers and magazines have moved to all digital formats. But one magazine in Georgia is making a print comeback. This year Decatur-based Paste Magazine started a quarterly magazine that looks and feels different. The second edition just came out. We learn more about the magazine’s reboot with founder and editor-in-chief, Josh Jackson.

First, the City of Atlanta plans to raise the minimum wage for city workers to $15 an hour. Following a national trend, Atlanta is the first such place in Georgia to make the move. But will a minimum wage increase hurt or help the working class? We talk about the pros and cons with Kristy Offitt, Employment Litigator for Ogletree Deakins in Atlanta. And Tom Smith, Assistant Professor of Finance at Emory University.

Public Domain Pictures

The Smithsonian Channel just launched a new series called “America in Color.” The five part program features historical film footage from the 1920s through the 1960s, presented in HD and with the addition of color. We talk about the show with the Executive Producer, John Cavanagh.

Pages