Sonari Glinton

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You know what has happened to the phone over time. You know, years ago - old days - 10 years ago, 15 years ago, it was just a phone.

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As car companies make strides toward expanding the reach of electric cars in the U.S., the same is happening in the world of two wheels.

Outside the U.S., motorcycles, mopeds and scooters are vital, affordable forms of transportation that alleviate congestion. They also run on fossil fuels, and many of the smaller motors are more polluting than regular cars.

California has the toughest air quality regulations of any state in the country. But they're not tough enough to satisfy a new state law that requires California to double the rate at which it cuts greenhouse gases.

So this month, the California Air Resources Board approved a plan it says is aimed at "decarbonizing" the state's economy.

The students entering college are not millennials. The next generation, Generation Z, has arrived. The oldest in the group are in their early 20s.

Not only have they never known a world without the Internet, some have had smartphones since middle school.

And for this group, memes, animated GIFs and emojis are second nature, says Geoff Nunberg, a linguist who does features on language on NPR's Fresh Air.

There's more than cars at an auto show.

Auto shows are not only a place for consumers but for vendors, executives, reporters, activists, investors and consumers. They are more like conventions. With 10,000 parts on a car, that means a lot of vendors.

You can see how different Tesla is from the rest of the car companies at a place like the LA Auto Show. At the Tesla booth, there's no glitz, or models leaning seductively. But it's swamped during a showing for journalists.

One of three Tesla car models on display at the show is the Model 3, aimed at the mass market. It's not only the car that's supposed to take Tesla mainstream but also the one to bring it to profitability.

But CEO Elon Musk's company has missed its production goals, and analysts wonder whether he's spreading himself too thin.

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