Stacey Vanek Smith

Stacey Vanek Smith is the co-host of NPR's The Indicator from Planet Money. She's also a correspondent for Planet Money, where she covers business and economics. In this role, Smith has followed economic stories down the muddy back roads of Oklahoma to buy 100 barrels of oil; flew to Pune, India, to track down the man who pitched the country's dramatic currency devaluation to the prime minister; and spoke with a North Korean woman who made a small fortune smuggling artificial sweetener in from China.

Prior to coming to NPR, Smith worked for Marketplace, where she was a correspondent and fill-in host. While there, Smith was part of a collaboration with The New York Times, where she explored the relationship between money and marriage. She was also part of Marketplace's live shows, where she produced a series of pieces on getting her data mined.

Smith is a native of Idaho and grew up working on her parents' cattle ranch. She is a graduate of Princeton University, where she earned a bachelor's degree in comparative literature and creative writing. She also holds a master's in broadcast journalism from Columbia University.

Too Small To Fail

17 hours ago

Independent bookstores got crushed by big box stores in the 90s, and hammered by Amazon in the aughts.

But since then, they've reinvented themselves.

Now independent bookstores are back, often as the mainstays of new retail developments.

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President Trump recently had a disagreement with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Trump says the U.S. has a trade deficit with Canada, Trudeau says it's a trade surplus.

Today on the show we explain how it's possible for both men to be right and wrong at the same time. It turns out that sometimes statistics is more art than science.


After the Revolutionary War, one of the first acts of the brand new Congress was to tax goods imported from foreign countries. Since then the debate over tariffs hasn't changed much, but the U.S. economy definitely has.

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The way most companies first sell their shares to the public is tried and true; hire an investment bank, do a roadshow, agree to a lockup period, etc etc.

But Spotify is doing none of those things. In fact it's not doing an initial public offering at all: it's doing a direct public offering instead.

It's an unusual move. but if it works, it could change the way a big part of Wall Street business is done.

How ans IPO gets done, step by step (CNBC)

Ten years ago, the investment bank Bear Stearns collapsed, and the government stepped in to broker a bailout.

William D. Cohan thinks that was a mistake. He wrote about Bear in his book, House of Cards.

He talked to us about what happened then and what's changed since.

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President Trump recently slapped tariffs on steel and aluminium imports from certain countries, but not because those countries don't play fair on trade.

Instead, the Trump administration cited national security concerns. The move has got him what he wants, but it puzzled America's trading partners. If they retaliate with the same tactic, the damage to the global trading system — and to the rules that underpin the system — could be huge.


Japan has more government debt (outstanding as a percentage of GDP) that Greece did at the height of its financial crisis. To the casual observer, Japan looks as overloaded as a Vegas buffet. And yet the country is somehow able to keep on borrowing at the same low, low rate. Why?

Also, what British (Indian) car does James Bond drive (but only once)?

Your questions, answered.

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Most products in this world are vulnerable to creative destruction: as new products are developed, they make old ones obsolete.

But there are some exceptions to this rule. There are products that persist, resisting change while economic evolution continues on without them.

Like the graphing calculator.

75.2 percent. That is the prime age female labor force participation rate, the share of all adult women between the ages of 25 and 54 who are working or looking for work.

In the 70s, 80s, and 90s, the number of women participating in the workforce went up and up and up.But, in 2000, that momentum waned.