Taylor Gantt

Radio Producer/ Back-Up Host

Taylor graduated from Georgia State University in 2015 with B.A in Journalism and a concentration in Telecommunications. He interned with On Second Thought during his Senior spring semester and immediately fell in love with the team and the GPB working environment (but mostly the t-shirts).

Taylor also worked as a freelance sports reporter for the Forsyth County News and a sports contributor for the growing southern magazine "The Kitchen Drawer." When he's not listening to Rush or groaning at the local teams, he can be found petting his cat "Mr. Jorge" or watching Netflix.

Ways to Connect

Andy Watson/BullStockMedia.com

Professional Bull Riding is a growing action sport, but many people have yet to experience an event in person. More than a thousand cowboys are members of the Professional Bull Riders organization, known as the PBR, which has doled out upwards of $140 million to winners in its more than 20 year existence.

 

We take a listen to an audio postcard from a PBR event in Duluth and hear from Shane Proctor and Derek Kolbaba , two daredevil riders who tangle with two-ton bulls for a career. 

VIDEO: Watch the event kick-off with pyrotechnics and fireworks:

commons.wikipedia.org

In Georgia, state legislatures are conducted on a part time basis. Most legislators are also involved in major secular fields, including medicine, law, and real estate. A recent Atlanta Journal Constitution article cites that many of these legislators are bringing bills to the floor that will directly benefit their personal career field.

We talk to AJC reporter Aaron Gould Sheinin about the potential for conflicts of interest when part-time lawmakers deal with policies that can affect their own bottom line.

twitter.com/NeumannicTimes

Being a teacher is not an easy job. Growing levels of career dissatisfaction, uncompetitive salaries, stress, low levels of teacher retention and many other factors make teaching a serious challenge. Ryan Neumann, a Cobb County teacher and host of the blog Neumannic Times, feels the weight of being a teacher and wrote a commentary based on the challenges voiced by many of his peers.

We take a listen to an excerpt of Ryan’s commentary and hear how he really feels about the his complicated career

publicdomainpictures.net

Although the average American life expectancy continues to improve, one demographic group has been dealing with substantial problems over the past few decades. Research from Princeton University discovered that older white Americans from ages 45-54 are experiencing sharp increases in health failure, poisoning from drugs and alcohol, and suicide.

    

jasonikeemrodgers.com

A conductor in Clarkston, GA is looking to add some much-needed diversity into the world of classical music. Jason Rodgers has founded Atlanta’s first all-black orchestra, which will be known as Orchestra Noir. The group will debut later in the year and hopes to encourage other classical music programs to further the cause of diversity.

We speak to conductor Jason Rodgers and Director of Community & Learning Caen Thomason-Redus for the Detroit Symphony Orchestra about the current status of diversity in classical music. 

Youtube.com/Quarterlife*(webseries)

Most people recognize the power of a midlife crisis, but two Atlanta performers are hoping to showcase  the funny foibles of life in your mid-20s. Celia Quillian and Shelli Delgado raised $10,000 through crowd funding in order to create their own Web series called "Quarter Life*."

We sit down with the two co-writers and producers of the show to talk about how we should really look at life during our mid-twenties. 

More info on Quarter Life*

Save The Bats, Save The Agriculture

Mar 9, 2016
commons.wikipedia.org

Bats may give us some of us the creeps, but their usefulness in the field of agriculture is undeniable. Bats can save farmers billions by merely eating their fill of crop insects. But the dangerous fungus known as "white-nose syndrome" continues to infect caves and kill bats, with some estimates saying that nearly 95 percent of the population is in danger.

We talk to Georgia State University microbiologist Chris Cornelison and wildlife pathologist Heather Fenton about the severity of the fungus and what’s being done to combat it.

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