Tony Harris

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Tony Harris is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, filmmaker, and host of Discovery ID’s “Scene of the Crime with Tony Harris.” Tony is also the host of the Discovery ID limited series “Hate In America” and “Behind Closed Doors,” Tony’s exploration of domestic violence in America. He narrated the 2014 Discovery Channel documentary “9/11 Rescue Cops.”

For six years, Harris anchored “CNN Newsroom with Tony Harris” where he earned George Foster Peabody Awards for coverage of the Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill and Hurricane Katrina. He also earned an Alfred I. duPont Award for coverage of the 2004 Southeast Asia tsunami. 

In a diverse broadcast career, Tony has served as New York-based correspondent for “Entertainment Tonight” as well and as an international news anchor for Al Jazeera English in Doha, Qatar.  

Candace Spates / On Second Thought

Clark Atlanta University this week welcomes its incoming freshman class in a way never done before-- with hacking. A six-hour technical marathon is open to as many as a thousand students. They will collaborate to code and come up with technical innovations that could change the world. The event is being labeled as the largest hackathon at a historically black college and university.

20th Century Fox

For years, we’ve seen gorillas come to life on the screen, in everything from “Planet of the Apes,” to “Congo,” and “The Jungle Book.” However, these cinematic portrayals aren’t all that accurate. University of Georgia anthropology professor Roberta Salmi is on a mission to change Hollywood’s depiction of gorillas. We talked with her about studying their behavior, and working as a consultant on the new film, “War for the Planet of the Apes.”

Access Atlanta

Ice Cream. Two little words that can attract a lot of people, especially when it’s hot outside. A festival in Atlanta recently celebrated summer’s quintessential dessert with family events and vendors offering more flavors than we can name. G-P-B intern Candace Spates sends us a postcard from the Atlanta Ice Cream Festival at Piedmont Park.

First, for years, we’ve seen gorillas come to life on the screen, in everything from “Planet of the Apes,” to “Congo,” and “The Jungle Book.” But these cinematic portrayals aren’t all that accurate. University of Georgia anthropology professor Roberta Salmi is on a mission to change Hollywood’s depiction of gorillas. We talk with her about studying their behavior, and working as a consultant on the new film, “War for the Planet of the Apes.”

Old Shoe Woman / Foter

This week marks the beginning of school for many districts in Metro Atlanta. But as of mid-June, there were 1,400 vacancies in schools across the city. DeKalb County alone lost 900 teachers at the end of last school year.

Wabe

A debate is going on over the operation of immigration detention centers. Georgia’s Stewart Detention Center in Lumpkin is one of the largest in the country. It is run by a private company. There are many like it. Critics say those private facilities are problematic. Last year, a Homeland Security Advisory Council said they should be phased out. However, a separate subcommittee wants to continue using private immigrant detention facilities, but that committee wants greater oversight. We talk more about this with Azadeh Shahshahani, the legal and advocacy director with Project South.

Pixabay

A recent report puts Georgia 41st in the nation for its quality of senior health. According to America’s Health Rankings Senior Report, that’s two slots lower than last year. We talk about senior health in the state with Kathy Floyd of the Georgia Council on Aging and Glenn Osster of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Georgia.

First, a recent report puts Georgia 41st in the nation for its quality of senior health. According to America’s Health Rankings Senior Report, that’s two slots lower than last year. We talk about senior health in the state with Kathy Floyd of the Georgia Council on Aging and Glenn Osster of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Georgia.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control shows that 30 million Americans -- nearly 10 percent of the population -- have diabetes. The study also shows nearly a quarter of them -- more than seven million -- are undiagnosed. And the South, Georgia included, has the highest concentration of people with the disease. We talk with Sarah Piper, Senior Program Associate for the Diabetes Training and Technical Assistance Center at Emory University and Andy Miller, President of Georgia Health News.

First, a new report from the Centers for Disease Control shows that 30 million Americans -- nearly 10 percent of the population -- have diabetes. The study also shows nearly a quarter of them -- more than seven million -- are undiagnosed. And the South, Georgia included, has the highest concentration of people with the disease. We talk with Sarah Piper, Senior Program Associate for the Diabetes Training and Technical Assistance Center at Emory University and Andy Miller, President of Georgia Health News.

drivebybiscuits1 / Foter

Wesleyan College in Macon is looking to apologize for past ties to racism, slavery, and the Ku Klux Klan. Information about the school’s history came to light recently through the research of students at Wesleyan. This comes just months after an incident involving racist graffiti on a dorm room wall.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Dikembe Mutombo is one of the most recognizable players in Atlanta Hawks history. Now retired, the seven-foot-two-inch center spent five seasons in Atlanta, and was a defensive powerhouse in the NBA for 18 seasons.

First, the fate of the police department in the small town of Varnell in Whitfield County is suddenly uncertain. Earlier this month, the city council voted to eliminate the department because of costs, with little warning. The mayor ultimately vetoed that move, but the council could override that veto on Tuesday. We talk with reporter Chris Whitfield, who has been covering this story for The Daily Citizen in Dalton.

Varnell Police Department

The fate of the police department in the small town of Varnell in Whitfield County is suddenly uncertain. Earlier this month, the city council voted to eliminate the department because of costs, with little warning. The mayor ultimately vetoed that move, but the council could override that veto on Tuesday.

Jackson Beals

For nearly a decade, Atlanta filmmaker Amanda Avery was a sex worker. Her experiences culminated into the short film, "Leaving Charlie." Amanda wrote, directed, and starred in the film. She also made a point of bringing on an all-female and gender nonconforming crew.

Wikimedia Commons

The Atlanta City Council, along with the United Way, has committed $50 million  to help combat homelessness. This comes after news that the city’s largest shelter, Peachtree-Pine, will close by the end of August. Joining us is Rick Westbrook, Executive Director for Lost N Found, and Deirdre Oakley, Professor of Sociology for Georgia State University. 

First, the Atlanta City Council, along with the United Way, has committed $50 million  to help combat homelessness. This comes after news that the city’s largest shelter, Peachtree-Pine, will close by the end of August. Joining us is Rick Westbrook, Executive Director for Lost N Found, and Deirdre Oakley, Professor of Sociology for Georgia State University.

First, one of the first African-American elementary schools in Atlanta was recently slated for destruction. But after outcry a piece of the structure was saved, to become part of a new YMCA center in Vine City. This is just one fight in a perennial battle over historic preservation. A recent National Trust for Historic Preservation study says Atlanta has a  teardown culture -- worse than just about about any other major American city. We talk about this with Sheffield Hale, President of the Atlanta History Center. And with Mtamanika Youngblood, President of Sweet Auburn Works.

Lacey Terrell / HBO

We talk with actor Tony Hale, best known for roles on "Veep" and "Arrested Development." He stars in the movie, "Brave New Jersey." It’s showing at the Macon Film Festival this week, July 20-23. 

We talk with actor Tony Hale, best known for roles on "Veep" and "Arrested Development." He stars in the movie, "Brave New Jersey." It’s showing at this week’s Macon Film Festival, July 20-23.

Then, 21 years have passed since Atlanta became an Olympic city. The games were transformative. For a look back, we re-visit a conversation we had with former NPR correspondent Kathy Lohr and Georgia State University professor Maurice Hobson.

David Goldman / AP Photo

The Atlanta Regional Commission predicts Gwinnett County will become Georgia’s most populous county by the year 2040, outpacing Fulton county with nearly 1.4 million residents. The county is launching a study to create a comprehensive transportation plan for the area.

Pixabay

Travel journalist Arthur Levine joins us to discuss roller coaster history, and the appeal of getting your kicks on a ride.  

Flickr

Six Flags just announced its historic wooden rollercoaster, The Georgia Cyclone, will be closed by the end of July. The park turned 50 this year, and a lot has changed since it opened. GPB producers Ryan McFadin and Sean Powers bring us an audio postcard from Six Flags.

Federal prosecutors are investigating bribes paid to Atlanta city officials in exchange for business contracts. Two contractors have already plead guilty to dishing out these bribes--though it is not clear who accepted them. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has exclusive new info on the situation. We talk with reporter Scott Trubey, who has been covering the bribery scandal at City Hall.

Then, Kaleb Anderson is a 19 year-old-from Atlanta. He was diagnosed with HIV just a couple of months before starting college. He shares his story in a commentary.

Wally Gobetz / Flickr

Federal prosecutors are investigating bribes paid to Atlanta city officials in exchange for business contracts. Two contractors have already plead guilty to dishing out these bribes--though it is not clear who accepted them. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has exclusive new info on the situation. We talk with reporter Scott Trubey, who has been covering the bribery scandal at City Hall.

Courtney McDermott

Athens band Five Eight has been a staple in the Georgia music scene for decades. An upcoming documentary called “Weirdo: The Story of Five Eight” follows the band’s return to glory. This week, the group premieres their new double record “Songs for St. Jude." Five Eight members Mike Mantione and Sean Dunn join us from Athens.

A report released last month provides a grim picture on the effects of gun violence on children. Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta found nearly 1,300 children in the United States die in shootings each year. That makes gunshot wounds the third leading cause of death for children up to the age of 17. We talk with Atlanta-based trauma surgeon Omar Danner, who worked on a separate report about the victims of gun violence admitted to Grady Hospital.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Atlanta-based comic book publishers Carlton and Darrick Hargro are working to develop more superheroes of color. The brothers are behind the new comic book company, 20th Place Media. They discussed their latest comic called “Moses,” which draws connections between the African slave trade and an alien abduction.

Jefferson Police Department via AP

Gun rights are often a subject of political argument, but doctors see the physical effects of gun violence everyday. Researchers at the Morehouse School of Medicine reviewed gunshot victims at a trauma center in Atlanta, and they found that over two years the bulk of the patients were male and African-American. We talked with Dr. Omar Danner, one of the study's researchers.

www.killertomatofest.com

The Killer Tomato is coming this weekend. The Killer Tomato Festival, that is. Atlanta restaurateur and chef Ford Fry and Georgia Organics Director Alice Rolls join us to talk about southern cooking with juicy, ripe tomatoes.

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