Tony Harris

BACKUP HOST - ON SECOND THOUGHT

Tony Harris is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, filmmaker, and host of Discovery ID’s “Scene of the Crime with Tony Harris.” Tony is also the host of the Discovery ID limited series “Hate In America” and “Behind Closed Doors,” Tony’s exploration of domestic violence in America. He narrated the 2014 Discovery Channel documentary “9/11 Rescue Cops.”

For six years, Harris anchored “CNN Newsroom with Tony Harris” where he earned George Foster Peabody Awards for coverage of the Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill and Hurricane Katrina. He also earned an Alfred I. duPont Award for coverage of the 2004 Southeast Asia tsunami. 

In a diverse broadcast career, Tony has served as New York-based correspondent for “Entertainment Tonight” as well and as an international news anchor for Al Jazeera English in Doha, Qatar.  

Jordan Strauss Invision / The Associated Press

The Breakroom gang joins guest host Tony Harris to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes farmer Jon Jackson, Fayette County Commissioner Steve Brown, Natalie Pawelski of Cater Communications, and Nsenga Burton, who chairs Mass Media Arts at Clark Atlanta University. 

BREAKROOM TOPICS:

Is Atlanta at risk of overcrowding? Last month, The Atlanta Regional Commission reported nearly 80,000 new people in the metro region since just last year -- the highest growth rate since the Great Recession. How this will affect more than your commute, like your rent, and your space to walk down the street, has yet to be seen. We talk with Mike Carnathan, a researcher with the Atlanta Regional Commission, and Chris Leinberger, a business professor at George Washington University.

Gene Blythe / AP Photo

In the last year, nearly 80,000 people moved to the Atlanta metro area. The city is growing at its fastest rate since the Great Recession. But can the city meet its needs and maintain its desirable status? We talk about this with Mike Carnathan, a Researcher with the Atlanta Regional Commission.

The South has seen its Hispanic population increase 43 percent between 2007 and 2014, according to the Pew Research Center. The story of the 1996 Olympic Games is key to understanding the Latino boom in Atlanta, and in the South more broadly.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

The South has seen its Hispanic population increase 43 percent between 2007 and 2014, according to the Pew Research Center. The story of the 1996 Olympic Games is key to understanding the Latino boom in Atlanta, and in the South more broadly.

Elise Amendola / The Associated Press

The fallout from the data breach at Atlanta-based Equifax is far and wide. At the end of July, the credit rating company learned it had been hacked, leaving personal information of more than 140 million people exposed. But that revelation wasn’t made public until this month. Now the company is facing a number of lawsuits, investigations, and a massive stock price hit. We talked with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Tamar Hallerman, who has been following this story from Capitol Hill.

Jeff Roberson / AP Photo

The rate of Americans with epilepsy is continuing to rise, based on new data from The Centers For Disease Control And Prevention. The data is the first report to get complete epilepsy numbers from every state. It finds more than 3.4 million adults and children now have epilepsy. We talk about this issue with Rosemarie Kobau, a Health Scientist with the CDC. And Joseph Sirven, Professor of Neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, and Editor at Epilepsy.com.  

The fallout from the data breach at Atlanta-based Equifax is far and wide. At the end of July, the credit rating company learned it had been hacked, leaving personal information of more than 140 million people exposed. But that revelation wasn’t made public until this month. Now the company is facing a number of lawsuits, investigations, and a massive stock price hit. We talk with Atlanta-Journal Constitution reporter Tamar Hallerman, who has been following this story from Capitol Hill.

Erika Beras for NPR

Culinary historian Michael Twitty traces his ancestry—both black and white—through food. In his memoir, "The Cooking Gene," he asks the question: "Who owns Southern food?" We talked with him ahead of his appearance on Thursday, Sept. 21 at 8 p.m.

Courtesy of Theatre Macon

Theatre Macon has fostered talent in Middle Georgia for over three decades. Founding Artistic Director Jim Crisp has been with the theater since its inception 32 years ago. He announced this summer he would retire at the end of the upcoming season. We talk with Crisp about the legacy of the theater in Macon, and his work on hundreds of stage productions. 

Learning From Life's Failures

Sep 19, 2017
Patch.com

Failure is a fact of life. We’ve all been there: whether it’s as simple as tripping over your own feet, or as serious as dealing with a divorce. Atlanta author Amy Lyle wants to share, so people can laugh at -- and learn from -- her own life’s failings.

FX Networks

It’s time for our regular roundup of movies and television shows currently filming in Georgia. We talk with AJC Buzz Blog writer Jennifer Brett about the new Ant Man movie, Kevin Hart’s latest comedy, and the much-awaited second season of the FX show "Atlanta."

It’s time for our regular roundup of movies and television shows currently filming in Georgia. We talk with AJC Buzz Blog writer Jennifer Brett about the new Ant-Man movie, Kevin Hart’s latest comedy, and the much-awaited second season of the FX show "Atlanta."

Wikimedia Commons

A recent study done by the Department of Labor shows that employed Americans spend more time working than on any other activity during the hours they are awake.  Of them, many say they dislike where they work, but few really do love their jobs. The Atlanta Business Chronicle just released its annual list of the best places to work here in the city.  Joining us to talk about the keys to workplace happiness is Tom Conklin, Clinical Associate Professor of Managerial Sciences at Georgia State University.

A recent study done by the Department of Labor shows that employed Americans spend more time working than on any other activity during the hours they are awake.  Of them, many say they dislike where they work, but few really do love their jobs. The Atlanta Business Chronicle just released its annual list of the best places to work here in the city.  Joining us to talk about the keys to workplace happiness is Tom Conklin, Clinical Associate Professor of Managerial Sciences at Georgia State University.

Nicole Abalde / flickr

Food can evoke so many rich memories. A new book by Savannah food writer Jonathan Barrett captures some of the stories tied to Southern recipes. We talked with Barrett, author of the new book, Cook & Tell. We also heard from freelance writer Amy Condon, who contributed her own story to the book.

 

Candace Spates / On Second Thought

Clark Atlanta University this week welcomes its incoming freshman class in a way never done before-- with hacking. A six-hour technical marathon is open to as many as a thousand students. They will collaborate to code and come up with technical innovations that could change the world. The event is being labeled as the largest hackathon at a historically black college and university.

20th Century Fox

For years, we’ve seen gorillas come to life on the screen, in everything from “Planet of the Apes,” to “Congo,” and “The Jungle Book.” However, these cinematic portrayals aren’t all that accurate. University of Georgia anthropology professor Roberta Salmi is on a mission to change Hollywood’s depiction of gorillas. We talked with her about studying their behavior, and working as a consultant on the new film, “War for the Planet of the Apes.”

Access Atlanta

Ice Cream. Two little words that can attract a lot of people, especially when it’s hot outside. A festival in Atlanta recently celebrated summer’s quintessential dessert with family events and vendors offering more flavors than we can name. G-P-B intern Candace Spates sends us a postcard from the Atlanta Ice Cream Festival at Piedmont Park.

First, for years, we’ve seen gorillas come to life on the screen, in everything from “Planet of the Apes,” to “Congo,” and “The Jungle Book.” But these cinematic portrayals aren’t all that accurate. University of Georgia anthropology professor Roberta Salmi is on a mission to change Hollywood’s depiction of gorillas. We talk with her about studying their behavior, and working as a consultant on the new film, “War for the Planet of the Apes.”

Old Shoe Woman / Foter

This week marks the beginning of school for many districts in Metro Atlanta. But as of mid-June, there were 1,400 vacancies in schools across the city. DeKalb County alone lost 900 teachers at the end of last school year.

Wabe

A debate is going on over the operation of immigration detention centers. Georgia’s Stewart Detention Center in Lumpkin is one of the largest in the country. It is run by a private company. There are many like it. Critics say those private facilities are problematic. Last year, a Homeland Security Advisory Council said they should be phased out. However, a separate subcommittee wants to continue using private immigrant detention facilities, but that committee wants greater oversight. We talk more about this with Azadeh Shahshahani, the legal and advocacy director with Project South.

Pixabay

A recent report puts Georgia 41st in the nation for its quality of senior health. According to America’s Health Rankings Senior Report, that’s two slots lower than last year. We talk about senior health in the state with Kathy Floyd of the Georgia Council on Aging and Glenn Osster of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Georgia.

First, a recent report puts Georgia 41st in the nation for its quality of senior health. According to America’s Health Rankings Senior Report, that’s two slots lower than last year. We talk about senior health in the state with Kathy Floyd of the Georgia Council on Aging and Glenn Osster of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Georgia.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control shows that 30 million Americans -- nearly 10 percent of the population -- have diabetes. The study also shows nearly a quarter of them -- more than seven million -- are undiagnosed. And the South, Georgia included, has the highest concentration of people with the disease. We talk with Sarah Piper, Senior Program Associate for the Diabetes Training and Technical Assistance Center at Emory University and Andy Miller, President of Georgia Health News.

First, a new report from the Centers for Disease Control shows that 30 million Americans -- nearly 10 percent of the population -- have diabetes. The study also shows nearly a quarter of them -- more than seven million -- are undiagnosed. And the South, Georgia included, has the highest concentration of people with the disease. We talk with Sarah Piper, Senior Program Associate for the Diabetes Training and Technical Assistance Center at Emory University and Andy Miller, President of Georgia Health News.

drivebybiscuits1 / Foter

Wesleyan College in Macon is looking to apologize for past ties to racism, slavery, and the Ku Klux Klan. Information about the school’s history came to light recently through the research of students at Wesleyan. This comes just months after an incident involving racist graffiti on a dorm room wall.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Dikembe Mutombo is one of the most recognizable players in Atlanta Hawks history. Now retired, the seven-foot-two-inch center spent five seasons in Atlanta, and was a defensive powerhouse in the NBA for 18 seasons.

First, the fate of the police department in the small town of Varnell in Whitfield County is suddenly uncertain. Earlier this month, the city council voted to eliminate the department because of costs, with little warning. The mayor ultimately vetoed that move, but the council could override that veto on Tuesday. We talk with reporter Chris Whitfield, who has been covering this story for The Daily Citizen in Dalton.

Varnell Police Department

The fate of the police department in the small town of Varnell in Whitfield County is suddenly uncertain. Earlier this month, the city council voted to eliminate the department because of costs, with little warning. The mayor ultimately vetoed that move, but the council could override that veto on Tuesday.

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