Tony Harris

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Tony Harris is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, filmmaker, and host of Discovery ID’s “Scene of the Crime with Tony Harris.” Tony is also the host of the Discovery ID limited series “Hate In America” and “Behind Closed Doors,” Tony’s exploration of domestic violence in America. He narrated the 2014 Discovery Channel documentary “9/11 Rescue Cops.”

For six years, Harris anchored “CNN Newsroom with Tony Harris” where he earned George Foster Peabody Awards for coverage of the Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill and Hurricane Katrina. He also earned an Alfred I. duPont Award for coverage of the 2004 Southeast Asia tsunami. 

In a diverse broadcast career, Tony has served as New York-based correspondent for “Entertainment Tonight” as well and as an international news anchor for Al Jazeera English in Doha, Qatar.  

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Churches in the United States are barred from endorsing political candidates, or contributing to campaigns. This part of our tax code is known as the Johnson Amendment. It includes all non-profit organizations. But some Republicans, including President Trump, want to repeal the amendment as part of a federal tax overhaul happening now. We talk with researcher Matthew Boedy, an assistant professor at the University of North Georgia, and Susan Anderson,  an accounting professor at Elon University in North Carolina.

NPR

If you want to pass out meals to homeless people in Atlanta, you'll now need a permit. City police have begun enforcing a decades-old policy requiring one to distribute food to homeless people. Those who don't comply face fines. We sit down to discuss this policy with Deidre Oakley, Professor of Sociology at Georgia State University, and George Chidi, Social Impact Director for Central Atlanta Progress.

Churches in the United States are barred from endorsing political candidates, or contributing to campaigns. This part of our tax code is known as the Johnson Amendment. It includes all non-profit organizations. But Republicans, including President Trump, want to repeal the amendment as part of a federal tax overhaul happening now. We talk about politics from the pulpit with researcher Matthew Boedy, an assistant professor at the University of North Georgia. And we discuss how taxes change behavior with Susan Anderson,  an accounting professor at Elon University in North Carolina.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought.

All this year, we have raised a glass to Southern food. From sweet tea to fried chicken, every Southern dish tells a story. Southern food scholar Adrian Miller and Ashli Stokes of the Center for the Study of the New South helped us dig into the history of mac and cheese, and how the creamy dish helps us understand Southern identity. 

TaxCredits.net / Flickr

Tuesday, November 7, Atlanta voters will pick a new mayor. With nine candidates vying for office, campaign fundraising and robocalls have played a major role in the race. That’s been a hot-button issue as the feds investigate pay-to-play contracts at city hall. 

Next Tuesday, Atlanta voters will pick a new mayor. With nine candidates vying for office, campaign fundraising and robocalls have played a major role in the race. That’s been a hot-button issue as the feds investigate pay-to-play contracts at city hall.  A joint investigation by the Atlanta Journal Constitution and Georgia News Lab examines the flow of money from city contractors to the campaigns. We talk with AJC reporter Dan Klepal and Georgia News Lab reporter Ryan Basden.

The Breakroom returns to discuss the upcoming implosion of the Georgia Dome and the indictment of Paul Manafort. We also talk about one school’s Civil War reenactment, why some of us are not getting enough sleep, and the allegations of sexual assault against Kevin Spacey. Joining us this week are Tomika DePriest, Ed Sohn, Simon Bloom, and London Brown.

Jordan Strauss Invision / The Associated Press

The Breakroom gang joins guest host Tony Harris to weigh in on the week's news. The panel includes farmer Jon Jackson, Fayette County Commissioner Steve Brown, Natalie Pawelski of Cater Communications, and Nsenga Burton, who chairs Mass Media Arts at Clark Atlanta University. 

BREAKROOM TOPICS:

Is Atlanta at risk of overcrowding? Last month, The Atlanta Regional Commission reported nearly 80,000 new people in the metro region since just last year -- the highest growth rate since the Great Recession. How this will affect more than your commute, like your rent, and your space to walk down the street, has yet to be seen. We talk with Mike Carnathan, a researcher with the Atlanta Regional Commission, and Chris Leinberger, a business professor at George Washington University.

Gene Blythe / AP Photo

In the last year, nearly 80,000 people moved to the Atlanta metro area. The city is growing at its fastest rate since the Great Recession. But can the city meet its needs and maintain its desirable status? We talk about this with Mike Carnathan, a Researcher with the Atlanta Regional Commission.

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