Tony Harris

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Tony Harris is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, filmmaker, and host of Discovery ID’s “Scene of the Crime with Tony Harris.” Tony is also the host of the Discovery ID limited series “Hate In America” and “Behind Closed Doors,” Tony’s exploration of domestic violence in America. He narrated the 2014 Discovery Channel documentary “9/11 Rescue Cops.”

For six years, Harris anchored “CNN Newsroom with Tony Harris” where he earned George Foster Peabody Awards for coverage of the Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill and Hurricane Katrina. He also earned an Alfred I. duPont Award for coverage of the 2004 Southeast Asia tsunami. 

In a diverse broadcast career, Tony has served as New York-based correspondent for “Entertainment Tonight” as well and as an international news anchor for Al Jazeera English in Doha, Qatar.  

The Breakrooms returns to discuss the new Transformers movie, covfefe, and Russian jets. Our guests are Soumaya Khalifa, Kalena Boller, Amber Scott, and Steve Brown. 

First, the Smithsonian Channel just launched a new series called “America in Color.” The five part program features historical film footage from the 1920s through the 1960s, presented in HD and with the addition of color. We talk about the show’s Georgia ties with the Executive Producer, John Cavanagh.

Homeless Pets are everywhere in Georgia. The issue has been labeled the biggest challenge facing shelter and rescue operations in our state. We spoke with Gloria Dorsey, vice president of Community Education at the Atlanta Humane Society. We also heard from Jessica Rock, a founding partner at Animal Law Source.  

A new café in Atlanta caters to cats and their humans. At Java Cats Café, you can order coffee and hang out with adoptable cats. GPB’s Sean Powers stopped by to learn more about this purrfectly feline coffee shop. 

Investigative Reporters and Editors

Government transparency helps a democracy function, but many communities have a long way to go. One journalism organization is singling out the most secretive government agencies and officials with the Golden Padlock Award. The award, given out by Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE), is not much of an honor. This weekend, it went to U.S.

Alex E. Proimos / Foter

The U.S. Senate’s proposed health care overhaul is likely to cut health coverage for poor people and children. We talk about what’s in the bill and the potential consequences with Georgia Health News Editor Andy Miller, Georgia Budget & Policy Institute Health Policy Analyst Laura Harker, and Karoline Mortensen, Professor of Health Sector Management and Policy at the University of Miami.

First, President Trump recently unveiled new trade restrictions with Cuba. We look at how this will impact Georgia’s poultry industry. Joining us is James Sumner, President of the USA Poultry & Egg Export Council and Marisa Anne Pagnattaro, Associate Dean for UGA’s Terry College of Business.

Pixabay

President Trump recently unveiled new trade restrictions with Cuba. We look at how this will impact Georgia’s poultry industry. Joining us is James Sumner, President of the USA Poultry & Egg Export Council and Marisa Anne Pagnattaro, Associate Dean for UGA’s Terry College of Business.

WALB-TV

According to a recent lawsuit, hundreds of students at Worth County High School in Sylvester, Georgia were the subject of a humiliating pat-down by local sheriff's deputies. The case raises questions about privacy on school campuses.

Wikimedia Commons

A recent survey by the University of Georgia finds that 16 percent of Georgians don’t have access to a high-speed internet connection. The vast majority of those effected live in the state’s rural regions. We talk about broadband deserts with UGA’s Associate Director of the Carl Vinson Institute of Government Eric McRae.

Finally, broadband deserts are a political issue as well. Kyle Wingfield, a conservative columnist for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, brings us a commentary.

First, according to a recent lawsuit, hundreds of students at Worth County High School in Sylvester, Georgia were the subject of a humiliating pat-down by local sheriff's deputies. The case raises questions about privacy on school campuses. We speak with Robyn McDougle of the Commonwealth Educational Policy Institute.

Paul Malinowski / Foter

One of America’s most beloved species is making a comeback. The bald eagle was nearly extinct, before being labeled endangered in the 1960s. But a record number of bald eagle nests have been documented in Georgia this year, according to the state Department of Natural Resources. 

First, walking might be good for your health, but maybe not so good for your safety. Last year, 236 pedestrians were killed in Georgia. That’s a 40 percent increase in just two years. We discuss this with Sally Flocks, President and CEO of PEDS, which advocates for pedestrian safety in Georgia.

David Goldman / The Associated Press

President Trump has accused the news media of not covering terrorist attacks adequately. New research from Georgia State University shows the president is partially right. Researchers find there is a systematic bias in the way terrorism is covered, and an attacker’s identity can have an impact on coverage.

Transportation for America / Foter

Walking might be good for your health, but maybe not so good for your safety. Last year, 236 pedestrians were killed in Georgia. That’s a 40 percent increase in just two years. We discuss this with Sally Flocks, President and CEO of PEDS, which advocates for pedestrian safety in Georgia.

A new film called “All Eyez On Me” celebrates the life of rapper Tupac Shakur on what would’ve been his 46th birthday. The Atlanta University Center Robert W. Woodruff Library is home to a huge collection of Tupac’s works, including handwritten manuscripts, writings from his diary, song lyrics, and other personal items. We talk with hip-hop scholar Nsenga Burton about the collection and Tupac’s legacy.

Matt Rourke / AP Photo

June is Elder Abuse Awareness Month. The recently published America’s Health Rankings Senior Report finds the state now ranks 41st in the nation for senior health, down two spots from last year. We talk about the state of our elder care system with Kathy Floyd, Executive Director for the Georgia Council on Aging. And Glenn Ostir, Director of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Georgia.

On Set In Georgia

Jun 21, 2017
Chuck Zlotnick / Columbia Pictures

From the next installments of the Avengers series to a new Godzilla flick, there are a lot of major productions currently filming in Georgia. Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Jennifer Brett gave us an update about the latest blockbusters in the state.

Courtesy of Roadkill Ghost Choir

All this week we get additions to the essential Georgia playlist from musicians playing at AthFest over the weekend, June 23-25. Today’s picks come from Andrew Shepard of the Athens-based band Roadkill Ghost Choir. Picks include songs by Neutral Milk Hotel and Thayer Sarrano.

Physics Tutor / flickr

More than six decades ago, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its historic Brown v. Board of Education ruling. For the first time in history, it was illegal for states to have separate public schools for black and white students. However, many public schools in the South have actually re-segregated in the years since Brown v. Board, according to a recent report from Civil Rights Project at UCLA.

wallyg / Foter

A recent study finds Atlanta lags behind nearly every large city in the country when it comes to preserving historic architecture. A 1922 building in Vine City was recently slated for teardown, only to be partially saved as a YMCA center.

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