Trevor Young

On Second Thought Producer

Trevor Young currently works as a Producer for "On Second Thought" with Celeste Headlee at Georgia Public Broadcasting. 

Ways to Connect

Georgia’s Girl Scouts recently joined the debate over a Savannah bridge name. As it stands, Talmadge Memorial Bridge honors a segregationist. The Girl Scouts would like the bridge renamed in honor of their founder and Savannah native, Juliette Gordon Low. Today marks 91 years since Low’s death. We talk about her life with Girl Scouts historian Jami Brantley. She manages the Girl Scout First Headquarters Museum in Savannah.

Last week, a federal judge temporarily halted the Trump administration's plan to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. It’s unclear if legislative efforts to extend the program will be successful. 

Hayes Buchanan / Creative Loafing

For years, print publications have been struggling to stay afloat in a digital world. Recently, that uphill battle hit Atlanta’s alternative magazines.

Sean Powers / GPB

The Breakroom gang has a lot of news to cover this week. We’ll talk about Oprah’s impassioned Golden Globes speech, why more college students are finding sugar daddies, and what UGA’s big loss means for Georgia football fans. We also look at the rising popularity of cassette tapes, wonder if cash is going out of style, and ask if kids are spending too much time on smart phones. Joining us in the Breakroom are Natalie Pawelski, Charles Richardson, Sam Burnham, and Amber Scott.

For years, print publications have been struggling to stay afloat in a digital world. Recently, that uphill battle hit Atlanta’s alternative magazines. Creative Loafing announced last month it would cut its staff, after transitioning from weekly to monthly earlier in the year. We talk about the role of alternative magazines with Keith Herndon, Professor of Journalism at the University of Georgia. He is also author of the book, ‘The Decline of the Daily Newspaper.’

We’ve all seen it: somebody shops on their work computer, or takes really long lunches, or “borrows” supplies. The workplace doesn’t always foster the most ethical behavior. But recent University of Georgia research shows it can get worse than that. Many employees lie on their timesheets, and even trash their co-workers to get ahead. We discuss with Marie Mitchell, a Professor of Management in the Terry College of Business at UGA. And Karen Rommelfanger, a professor from the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Emory University.

This hour we get into some serious questions about science, economic development and where the two meet. But first, we revisit a conversation about the power of curiosity for its own sake. The Ig Nobel Prizes reward silliness in science. They’ve been awarded annually since 1991, to honor achievements that first make you laugh, then make you think. Georgia Tech doctoral student Patricia Yang won one in 2015. She joins the show with Marc Abrahams, founder of the Ig Nobel Prizes.

Misenus1 / Foter

Little is known about the Alpha-Gal allergy. The condition causes people to break out or experience more severe conditions after eating meat. The allergy has spread via the Lone Star tick, a deadly culprit making its way across the Southeast. 

Mel Evans / AP Photo

More Americans are choosing to rent rather than buy homes. That’s especially true in Atlanta, which saw a 67 percent jump in rentals between 2010 and 2015 -- one of the highest rates in the country. We talk about this trend with Dan Immergluck, Professor in the Urban Studies Institute at Georgia State University.

  

The Georgia legislative session has begun. Among many bills in play: a sweeping plan to revitalize rural Georgia. This might mean paying people who move to the country, subsidizing internet connections, and making it easier for small hospitals to stay open and in the black. But how all this attention under the Gold Dome translates to real improvements for people outside Atlanta remains to be seen.  We talk with Sharon Wright Austin, a political scientist at the University of Florida. And Mark Niesse, a reporter for the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

 

Atlanta’s the college football center of the world on Monday night, as the University of Georgia Dawgs try to stem the University of Alabama’s Tide, in the National Championship game. A win for Georgia would be the first national championship victory for the team in more than 35 years. We get a preview from GPB’s senior sports correspondent Jon Nelson and University of Georgia sports journalism professor Vicki Michaelis.

The Avengers: Infinity War  was shot in Georgia recently. Another Avengers cast and crew are at work here, along with a slew of movies and TV shows. We talk about who’s working on what with Jennifer Brett. She writes the Buzz Blog for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Eric Gales

In the 1990s, blues guitarist Eric Gales was hailed as a child prodigy. With his left-handed playing technique, many compared the Memphis, Tennessee musician to Jimi Hendrix himself. Gales’ latest record is called ‘Middle of the Road,’ released last year. He’ll perform at Terminal West in Atlanta tomorrow night [Jan. 5] at 9 p.m. Producer Trevor Young caught up with him last week.

Actress Issa Rae got the attention of many audiences in 2011 with her popular Web series, "The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl." Five years later, her latest project is an HBO series called "Insecure.” Rae is up for a Golden Globe award for Best Actress in a Musical or Comedy TV Series this Sunday. We revisit a conversation with Rae about her new show and what she wishes she could tell her dad.

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Last month, the Federal Communications Commission repealed net neutrality. Those regulations prohibit broadband providers from blocking websites or charging for higher-quality service. But a lot of people still don’t understand what net neutrality is all about, so we break it down. Then, we take a look at how rural healthcare initiatives in Georgia will suffer without net neutrality in place.

Georgia lawmakers convene next week. The Center for Public Integrity and The Associated Press recently analyzed financial disclosure reports from state legislators nationwide. They found many examples of legislators using their power to benefit personal interests.  We talk with Liz Whyte, reporter with the Center for Public Integrity. And James Salzer, who covers state politics for the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Heidi May

Henry Rollins is a man who wears many hats. Perhaps best known as the frontman for the legendary 80s punk band Black Flag, Rollins now boasts a prolific career across radio, television, and the live stage. We catch up with Henry Rollins ahead of an appearance at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta on January 7.

The U.S. ranks worst among economically developed countries in maternal deaths. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, at least 700 mothers die every year; and black women face the greatest risk. A recent investigation by ProPublica and NPR examines racial disparity in maternal deaths. We talk with NPR Special Correspondent Renee Montagne, who has reported in Atlanta for this series.

A show featuring producer Trevor Young’s favorite OST segments of 2017. Hosted by Celeste Headlee:

This summer, more than sixty bands flocked to Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta for the fifth annual Shaky Knees Music Festival. Producer Trevor Young caught up with many musicians there, including rocker Ron Gallo. Gallo is best known for his philosophical musings and a care-free attitude. Trevor also spoke with Fantastic Negrito. The soulful artist was the first ever winner of NPR’s Tiny Desk Contest.

Mass shootings, volatile protests and major policy changes. Hurricane, after hurricane, after hurricane. And a solar eclipse that brought us together like never before in any living person’s lifetime. Yep, 2017 was a doozy. We take stock of the biggest news stories of the year, and the deeper conversations they sparked.

If you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on the short-form improvisational comedy show "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" Mochrie has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. We talked with him about his craft.

The Georgia film industry is big business - $9.5 billion big in 2017. We spent the hour meeting the people who work on film and television projects that are produced in the state

 

“My Cousin Vinny” premiered 25 years ago to critical and popular acclaim. Filmed mostly in Monticello, Georgia, it tells the story of an inexperienced New York attorney who takes on the biggest case of his career --- a murder trial. We looked back on the film’s legacy with its director, Jonathan Lynn.

A show featuring OST’s best music segments of 2017. Hosted by Celeste Headlee:

We talk with singer and songwriter Rhiannon Giddens, who is best known as the lead vocalist for the folk band the Carolina Chocolate Drops. Her new solo album, “Freedom Highway,” tells the stories of oppressed African-Americans. We caught up with her ahead of a performance at the Variety Playhouse in May.

We spent the hour talking about what makes Southern food Southern, how collard greens played a role in the civil rights movement, and the politics of barbecue. 

For the first time, Atlanta has a police officer dedicated to cases of animal cruelty. The position was created in October. And the first cop to fill the post is Senior Patrol Officer Amy Soelder. She’s a 22 year veteran of the force, and joins us in the studio.

Georgia educators are filing a class-action lawsuit against the state over retirement benefits. The state Department of Community Health changed a law in 2012, effectively reducing the subsidies of any retirees who were in the school system for less than five years. We talk about the controversy with James Salzer, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Dust To Digital

Gospel musician Washington Phillips has been shrouded in mystery for decades. The Texas-based artist recorded only 18 songs in the 1920s, which were lost to obscurity until recently. Atlanta-based Dust-to-Digital revived his music into a new collection called “Washington Phillips and His Manzarene Dreams.” That release was nominated for a Grammy Award. 

Teachers Rally Against Georgia Insurance Changes (T.R.A.G.I.C.)

Georgia educators are filing a class-action lawsuit against the state over retirement benefits. The state Department of Community Health changed a policy in 2012, effectively reducing the subsidies of any retirees who were in the school system for less than five years. We talk about the controversy with James Salzer, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

#MeToo is not only a movement about sexual harassment. It’s a reckoning for the way we work, and a call to change the power dynamics leading to sexual abuse. We talk with people who dedicate, in different ways, their professional lives to understanding toxic work environments and how to dismantle them. Erica Clemmons is the Georgia State Director for 9 to 5; Marie Mitchell is a professor of management at the University of Georgia’s business school; and Joey Price is the CEO of Jumpstart HR, a human resources consulting firm based in Baltimore.

The list of nicknames and titles for filmmaker John Waters is long and legend. Waters is more than a filmmaker. He’s an actor, writer, fashion icon, stand-up comedian and art collector. He performs in Atlanta on Friday with his one-man show, “A John Waters Christmas.” We get his take on the holiday season.

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