Trevor Young

On Second Thought Producer

Trevor Young currently works as a Producer for "On Second Thought" with Celeste Headlee at Georgia Public Broadcasting. 

Ways to Connect

We dedicate an entire show to the Southern drawl. Y’all listen up now…

Where did y’all come from, anyway? We can trace the use of the word all the way back to colonial ancestors. Cameron Hunt McNabb, an English professor at Southeastern University, gives us a history and dialect lesson. Plus, The Atlantic staff writer Vann Newkirk II makes the case for why y'all is needed.

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore has been accused of sexual misconduct by five women. Many high ranking Republicans have called on him to drop out of the race. But one state poll says Moore enjoys support by many Alabama evangelicals. This could be part of a bigger picture. In 2011, the Public Religion Research Institute found only 30 percent of white evangelicals thought elected officials who commit an immoral act could still fulfill their public duties. In 2016, that number had more than doubled, to 72 percent. We talk with Dan Cox,  Director of Research for PRRI.

Good news: breast cancer death rates dropped by nearly 40 percent in the last three decades. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosis for U.S. women. Skin cancer’s first. But there is bad news. Black women continue to die at a higher rate than whites, especially in the South. But some states have eliminated the racial disparity in breast cancer deaths. These are recent findings by the Atlanta-based American Cancer Society. Carol DeSantis is Director of Breast and Gynecological Surveillance for the organization, and our guest.

This summer, 27 so-called micronations gathered in Dunwoody, Georgia for MicroCon 2017. A micronation is defined as a small, self-proclaimed entity which claims to be an independent sovereign state, but is not acknowledged as such by any recognized sovereign state, or by any supranational organization. Vice News produced a documentary from the convention, which featured many micronations based within Georgia. We get the inside scoop from Vice Media Video Producer Oliver Noble.

Foter

The rate of suicide in rural America is climbing. A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds those in rural counties are about six percent more likely to die by suicide than those in cities. We talk about this troubling trend with Andy Miller, Editor for Georgia Health News. Asha Ivey-Stephenson, Behavioral Scientist for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, also joins us. 

Takénobu

Atlanta cellist Nick Ogawa, better known as "Takénobu," takes the cello beyond the orchestra. His latest album, “Reversal,” uses loops and percussive sounds to create thick soundscapes. We catch up with Takénobu ahead of a performance at Eddie’s Attic in Decatur this Sunday, November 19. 

A new book explores why so many young men of color wind up in prison. “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America” is the work of Yale Law School Professor James Forman, Jr. His father was a leader of SNCC -- the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Forman, Jr. is also a graduate of Atlanta’s Roosevelt High. He joins us in the studio.

R.E.M.

R.E.M.’s hit record “Automatic for the People” was released 25 years ago. In 1992, the album hit #2 on the Billboard 200 charts, and became certified 4x platinum in the United States. The record is getting an anniversary re-release, out tomorrow, November 10. We talk with Athens’ own Mike Mills, R.E.M.’s bass player.

Comedian Jim Gaffigan has appeared in “That 70s Show,” “Fargo,” “Bob’s Burgers,” and many times on “Law and Order.” But he may be best known for his stand-up comedy specials, and two seasons of "The Jim Gaffigan Show." We catch up with him ahead of a live show in Atlanta this weekend.

On Tuesday Atlantans voted for a new mayor and other important city positions. We analyze election day results with Andra Gillespie, Professor of Political Science at Emory University. And Greg Bluestein, Political Reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

The Athens music scene is legendary and always booming. Since it became famous for launching bands like R.E.M., the B-52s, and countless others, it has only grown in the number of bands, talent, and musical quality. Some Athenians are documenting the music and history of that town's scene. 

Ryan Basden

This spring, voter data was compromised at an election center at Kennesaw State University. State voters filed a lawsuit this summer, alleging the state could have prevented the suspected hacking. Shortly after, Georgia officials wiped the election data. Now state lawmakers are looking for answers.

John Bazemore / AP Photo

On Tuesday Atlantans voted for a new mayor and other important city positions. In Atlanta’s mayoral race, two women advanced to a runoff election. Elsewhere in the state, Democrats picked up two house seats in northeast Georgia and flipped a senate seat long held by the GOP. We analyze election day results with Andra Gillespie, Professor of Political Science at Emory University. And Greg Bluestein, Political Reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Three former sheriff’s deputies in Washington County, Georgia face murder charges. A man they tased this summer died. The incident was captured on video. We talk with GPB’s Grant Blankenship, who is following the case.

Many of Georgia’s historic theaters need repairs. This month, the Atlanta-based Fox Theatre Institute gave $85,000, shared by four theaters, for historic preservation. One recipient is Rome’s DeSoto Theatre. We learn about that theater’s legacy from Rome resident Tommy Lam, whose grandfather started the DeSoto.

Courtesy of Heather Coggins via AP

In 1983 a black man named Timothy Coggins was found murdered, in Spalding County, Georgia. He had been stabbed and mutilated to the point of disfigurement. No arrests were made until now. We get an update on this cold case from Fred Wimberly of the Georgia Bureau of Investigation and Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Nelson Helm.

Kellie Walsh

Though bioengineered humans like the ones in “Blade Runner” seem like science fiction now, we’re advancing closer and closer to that reality. A new book called “Body Builders: Inside the Science of the Engineered Human,” looks at how scientists are learning to create bionic human body parts.

Democrats lost big in 2016. But this year, progressive candidates in the South begin to win state and local races. Birmingham, Alabama recently joined the list of Southeastern cities electing left-leaning, African-American candidates. Senator Bernie Sanders personally endorsed Birmingham’s new Mayor-elect Randall Woodfin. Woodfin beat a two-term Democratic incumbent in a runoff election last month. We talk with Woodfin about his campaign, and his plans for Birmingham.

Next Tuesday, Atlanta voters will pick a new mayor. With nine candidates vying for office, campaign fundraising and robocalls have played a major role in the race. That’s been a hot-button issue as the feds investigate pay-to-play contracts at city hall.  A joint investigation by the Atlanta Journal Constitution and Georgia News Lab examines the flow of money from city contractors to the campaigns. We talk with AJC reporter Dan Klepal and Georgia News Lab reporter Ryan Basden.

Atlanta is among many American cities making an aggressive bid for Amazon’s second headquarters. The Georgia city of Stonecrest even offered to de-annex some land and name it Amazon. The company’s first HQ is in Seattle, Washington. And Seattle has some wisdom to share with other cities who might want to attract the retail giant. A new podcast is called “Prime(d): What Happens When Amazon Comes to Your Town?” It’s produced by KUOW, Puget Sound Public Radio. Reporter Joshua McNichols joins us.

Adult Swim

Atlanta-based Adult Swim has been an important ally to independent musicians since its inception in 2001. The music you hear everywhere on the programming block is produced by largely unknown artists. Jason DeMarco, Senior Vice President and Creative Director of On-Air, is the man in charge of Adult Swim music.

Rio Gandara/Helsingin Sanomat

The terms “alt-right,” “far-right,” and “radical right” get thrown around a lot these days. But there’s actually very little research on what those terms mean and who the people are identifying with them. Cas Mudde, Professor in the Department of International Affairs at UGA, is looking to change that. His new book is “The Far-Right in America.” He joins us to analyze the movement and its many subsets.

NASA/JPL-Caltech

Georgia Tech is not just looking at interstellar space, it’s also traveling through it. Georgia Tech student Michael Staab is a spacecraft flight controller for NASA. He piloted the Cassini spacecraft, which traveled around Saturn and nearby moons collecting data.

NSF/LIGO/Sonoma State University/A. Simonnet

In August, scientists at Georgia Tech discovered yet another gravitational wave. This one was 130 million years old, and for the first time, it came with a flash of light as well as a chirping sound. The wave is thought to be a result of a collision between two neutron stars, which blasted tons of gold into space.

The terms “alt-right,” “far-right,” and “radical right” get thrown around a lot these days. But there’s actually very little research on what those terms mean and who the people are identifying with them. Cas Mudde, Professor in the Department of International Affairs at UGA, is looking to change that. His new book is “The Far-Right in America.” He joins us to analyze the movement and its many subsets.

A full hour of tricks and treats and from the On Second Thought crew.

 

Georgia native Karin Slaughter has written several international bestsellers and they are not for the faint of heart. These are complicated, tough, and realistic thrillers. Her latest is “The Good Daughter.”  It’s about a terrifying event that rips apart a family and the small town where they live. We spoke with Karin Slaughter about revealing the dark side of Georgia’s small town life.

An Atlanta attorney accused of murder says it was a tragic accident.  The prosecutor says Tex McIver knew what he was doing when he shot his wife, Diane McIver. The case is explored in this season’s “Breakdown” podcast, produced by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. It premiered earlier this month. AJC reporter Bill Rankin joins us in the studio.

UGA College of Ag & Environmental Sciences - OCCS

On September 30, a rape allegedly occurred on the campus of the University of Georgia in Athens. Afterwards, students received no timely notifications or information from UGA officials. Of the 15 reported rapes on campus last year, students were only notified of two of them quickly.

 

Atlanta is officially a soccer town. In its first season, Atlanta United broke MLS attendance records and made the playoffs. The team plays its first postseason game at Mercedes-Benz Stadium Thursday night against the Columbus Crew. We talked with AU President Darren Eales about Georgia’s growing passion for what the rest of the world calls football.

Chris Ballard / GPB

Guns are more controversial in America than abortion, marijuana, and same-sex marriage. Many of the opinions surrounding guns come from what we hear and see through the media. And yet, our passions about weapons reflect deeper psychological values.

A special hour about guns in the South: the people who own them, the emotions they stir, how they’re bought and sold, the total cost of gun violence, and the history of laws controlling who has access to them.

Pages