Trevor Young

Associate Producer

Trevor Young currently works as a Reporting Fellow at Georgia Public Broadcasting. There he produces stories which reflect the unique and always exciting culture of Atlanta. He has been heard on NPR numerous times, and his stories air throughout the week on GPB's Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

 

An Austin, Texas native, Trevor has always been a sibling to all forms of music. He has been performing and attending live performances since he was 11 years old. He attended the Manhattan School of Music in New York City, and graduated from the McDuffie Center for Strings at Mercer University in Macon, Ga. 

 

In his free time, Trevor likes to take extended bike rides and practice his bass. Always an old soul, his favorite bands will forever be Rush, Pink Floyd and Genesis.

 

He hopes to use his journalism to bring awareness to the things he finds crucial, including new music, progressive education, the consequences of institutional poverty, and the need to build healthy minds and bodies.

Ways to Connect

Photo courtesy of Adult Swim

Atlanta-based Adult Swim is bringing back “Samurai Jack,” one of Cartoon Network’s most beloved animated shows. It ran for four seasons from 2001 to 2004, but the storyline never concluded. Samurai Jack has since become a cult classic in the animation world. And after much demand, the creators have revived it for Season Five.

We’re joined by Genndy Tartakovsky, the original creator; and Scott Wills, Art Director for the series.

uillaume Ziccarelli / Courtesy of Galerie Perrotin

Artist Daniel Arsham is best known for his work which blends architecture and performance art. His many installations across the country tend to stretch the boundaries of space and reality. Now, Arsham is bringing his work to Atlanta with three installations at the High Museum of Art.

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech is creating what it calls the most environmentally friendly building in the Southeast. It collects its own water and solar power, and uses them to satisfy energy needs and irrigate nearby vegetation.

This "living building" is on track to break ground later this year. We get a preview of this new structure from Howard Wertheimer, the school’s assistant vice president for capital planning and space management.

danielfoster437 / Foter

New reports from Atlanta-based health clinic CETPA find that Latino youth are being harassed and bullied more since last November’s presidential election. However, the Georgia Department of Education says it has not received complaints about bullying of Latino students in that time.

We try to sort all of this out with Georgia Health News editor Andy Miller. We also hear from Belisa Urbina, who is executive director of Ser Familia, which provides counseling and other services to Hispanic families in the metro Atlanta area.

Singer-songwriter Anthony Aparo is no stranger to the Atlanta music scene. He has been on the circuit as front man of Atlanta’s retro-electronic band Culture Culture since 2013. He's a regular musician on the bill for ATL Collective, a semi-monthly collaboration of local artists in Atlanta. He was also a member of the Athens folk-pop band Mr. Mustache.

Polybert49 / Foter

The label narcissist gets thrown around a lot, but it’s not usually used correctly. People often think "narcissistic" is a synonym for "arrogant," and that’s not true. Because narcissist is a word that many people use but often don’t understand, we break it down for you.

wallyg / Foter

Federal prosecutors are investigating bribes paid to Atlanta city officials in exchange for business contracts. Two contractors have already plead guilty to dishing out these bribes--though it is not clear who accepted them.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Scott Trubey has been covering the bribery scandal at City Hall. He joins us to help make sense of it all.

Olivia Reingold / GPB

The Breakroom returns with a week’s worth of crazy news to discuss. We’ll talk about why Democrats are meeting in Atlanta to elect a leader, and what it was about Milo Yiannopoulos’ recent controversy that tipped conservatives over the edge. Plus, we’ll look at research which show dogs have their own sense of morality, and another study which finds people who move around a lot lose out on friendships.

Our group this week includes:

Georgia National Guard / Foter

The Georgia Senate is one of  26 chambers in the nation that does not offer video streaming of committee meetings. Lawmakers often bar reporters and citizens from observing, and they don’t want other lawmakers recording the proceedings.

The Rocketeer / Foter

The Georgia Peach might well be the most iconic fruit to symbolize Georgia. You see it on license plates, billboards, and even government documents. But the peach is actually rare to Georgia, and not native to our agricultural climate.

Tom Okie is an Assistant Professor of History Education at Kennesaw State University. His new book, called “The Georgia Peach: Culture, Agriculture, and Environment in the American South,” explores the odd history of the fruit.

When you think of a fictional "hero," you might picture a strong, capable character. Someone who exudes confidence and is revered by those around them. But the heroes of Yiddish literature are very different.

Akhenaton06 / Foter

In 1967, the first African-American students were admitted to the Medical College of Georgia. Dr. Joseph Hobbs, one of the first black students to graduate, was the first black faculty member at the school.

Doctor Hobbs is now Chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia, and is organizing the 50th anniversary of desegregation at that college. He joins us from Augusta to discuss decades of work in elevating African-American doctors at the school.

Photo courtesy of Trudy Nan Boyce

Author and former Atlanta Police Officer Trudy Nan Boyce published her first novel, “Out of the Blues,” last year. That story follows the detective work of Sarah Alt--a.k.a “Salt”--as she investigates often gruesome crimes in the Atlanta area.

The second installment of Detective Salt’s story, called “Old Bones,” follows the fictional shooting of students at Spelman College. That book hits shelves February 21. Author Trudy Nan Boyce join us to discuss her new novel.

Raed Mansour / Foter

Repealing the Affordable Care Act could cost Georgia more than $20 million a year. It would also cost the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nearly $900 million—12 percent of the agency’s budget.

Keenan Jones / GPB

The Breakroom gang is back, and we’ve got a lot to talk about. We’ll discuss whether Super Bowl performances by Lady Gaga and The Schuyler Sisters need really be controversial. Plus, we’ll look at why the online dictionary is going viral, and how social media sites are stepping up to combat fake news. 

The Breakroom for today is:

TEDxKyoto / Flickr

Actor George Takei first warp sped to fame as a young Sulu in the original "Star Trek" series. But he’s since become an active voice in promoting equal rights for LGBT people.

Photo courtesy of Sheri Riley

Author Sheri Riley began her professional life at a record label in Atlanta. As marketing director at LaFace Records, she helped put numerous hip hop artists on the map -- TLC, Toni Braxton, and Usher, to name a few. But Sheri gave all that up to research and write about healthy lifestyles. She joins us to talk about her new book, “Exponential Living,” which comes out this week.

jontangerine / Foter

The battle for equal rights in America has centered around many modes of transportation--buses, trains, and streetcars for example. But one more form of travel should be added to that list: Airplanes. That’s the assertion of a new book from UGA Press called “Jim Crow Terminals: The Desegregation of American Airports.” The book covers the largely undocumented segregation at Southern airports in the 20th century. With us to discuss this is the author, Anke Ortlepp. She’s a Professor of North American and British History at the University of Kassel in Germany.

MarkMoz12 / Foter

A new report from housing site Trulia suggests house flipping activity has increased to the highest in a decade in 2016, with the Atlanta metro area ranking eighth in the country. They find that in 2016, 7.9 percent of all home sales in Atlanta were house flips, a modest 0.6 percent jump from the year before. We speak with Ralph McLaughlin, Chief Economist for Trulia, about these findings.

Photo courtesy of Kim Sorrells

Reverend Kim Sorrells grew up in conservative Alabama, and is now based in Atlanta. When Sorrells was in seminary, they, Sorrells' preferred pronoun, decided to transition to become gender-queer. Sorrells still faces daily struggles in reconciling Sorrells' identity with religious colleagues. We hear Sorrells' story, and a plight for a broader understanding of transgender individuals. 

DeeMo / Foter

Atlanta has seen a striking number of attacks by loose dogs in recent weeks. One such attack resulted in the death of a 6-year-old boy in southwest Atlanta. We talk about these events with Ellen Eldridge, a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. We also discuss how this may or may not affect the animal laws in the state with Jessica Rock, a Founding Partner at Animal Law Source.

mathiaswasik / Foter

Under a new, conservative administration, rights for LGBT individuals and families may come under threat. We discuss the status of current state and federal rights for LGBT citizens, and look at what battles might be ahead. With us is Atlanta-based LGBT activist Robbie Medwed, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Reporter Kristina Torres, and Lila Bradley, family law attorney at Claiborne Fox Bradley LLC.

Thomas Hawk / Foter

When you watch any high-profile awards ceremony, like the Oscars or the Emmys, you go in knowing a lot of it will be Hollywood fluff. But at least with those, you’re fairly confident that quality films and TV will be recognized.

 

 

That, unfortunately, is not the case with the Grammys. While the Emmys, for example, have rightfully helped put series like "Breaking Bad" or "Game of Thrones" in the history books of quality shows, the Grammys tend to write the wrong history.

Keenan Jones / GPB

The Breakroom is back, and there’s plenty to talk about. We’ll discuss the firing of former acting Attorney General Sally Yates, and if she has a place in Georgia politics. Then, we look at stories surrounding the Atlanta Falcons, including their increased national popularity and alleged overuse of painkillers. We’ll also see if classic movie reboots are any good, and we'll put to bed the debate whether Jack could’ve survived in “Titanic."

New America / Foter

Doctor Tom Frieden was appointed by President Obama in 2009 to head the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Following President Trump’s inauguration two weeks ago, Frieden stepped down from the CDC. Tom Frieden joins us to talk about his work with the CDC, and what he hopes to see happen there moving forward.

.sanden. / Foter

New legislation has passed the Georgia Senate which would allow local breweries to sell beer directly to consumers. The bill would do away with the current need to sell beer through tour packages. We talk with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Aaron Gould Sheinin, and Andrew Lorber, brewer and co-founder of Orpheus Brewing in Atlanta.

Foter

Following the success of its first online master’s degree program, this fall Georgia Tech will offer a second online master’s degree program in analytics. The cost for the degree is less than $10,000, a new investment in the institute’s model for low-cost, online graduate education. We talk with Nelson Baker, Dean of Professional Education, about what the program hopes to achieve.

 

 

Kate T. Parker

The role of a female photographer is especially important in an age when women are often depicted in superficial or sexualized ways. Many women in the photography industry are trying to change that, including Kate Parker, whose new book, “Strong is the New Pretty,” depicts girls as unique and capable, rather than simply primped and stereotypically pretty.

Photo Courtesy of Taylor Brown

"Fallen Land," a recent novel by writer and Georgia native Taylor Brown, depicts a couple fleeing a band of marauders in the final year of the Civil War. The book has been named one of Southern Living’s Best Books of 2016. Brown joins us to talk about his fiction and how it ties in to Georgia history.

Lisa Brewster / Foter

Casino gambling legislation was introduced in both the State House and Senate last week. Sponsors say they will provide jobs and bring tax revenue to local governments. Opponents say the casinos will bring crime and other issues. To discuss these concerns, we talk with Allan Vella, CEO of the Fox Theatre in Atlanta.

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