Trevor Young

On Second Thought Producer

Trevor Young currently works as a Producer for "On Second Thought" with Celeste Headlee at Georgia Public Broadcasting. 

Ways to Connect

David Giesbrecht / Netflix

For most of us, our idea of politics is influenced by what we see on TV. Millions of Americans regularly watch shows like “The West Wing,” “Veep,” and "House of Cards." Georgia native Jay Carson worked as supervising producer and political consultant for Netflix’s “House of Cards.” We talk with him about how to write engaging political drama in 2017, and how much the fictional White House resembles the real one.

This year a federal court in Chicago ruled for the first time that workers can’t be fired based on sexual orientation, extending workplace protections in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to the LGBT community. Yet, a Georgia judge ruled against a similar case. Now that case is up for appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. Jameka Evans claims Georgia Regional Hospital in Savannah fired her for being a lesbian. Earlier this month, 18 state attorneys general filed briefs in support of Evans's petition.

Imagine being in outer space with two sassy robots, and being forced to watch really bad science fiction movies with them. That’s the premise of the cult classic TV series, “Mystery Science Theater 3000.” The show got a reboot on Netflix this summer. We talk with series creator Joel Hodgson.

Ryan McFadin

The Breakroom returns to discuss Woody Allen’s comments on the “Me Too” campaign, and check out some upcoming Star Wars and Marvel films. We also talk about Georgia’s commitment to high speed rail, why boxing is less popular than it was, and if the infamous jewel thief Doris Payne is actually calling it quits. Joining us this week are Donnie Leapheart, Steve Brown, Kalena Boller, and Natalie Pawelski.

"On Second Thought" is celebrating its third anniversary this week. The show launched its first broadcast on GPB on October 20, 2014. To celebrate three amazing years, we’re re-airing our best segments in a two part broadcast. Here are the best picks for today:

This week "On Second Thought" celebrates three years on the air. The show launched October 20, 2014. To celebrate, we’re re-airing a few of our best segments. Do you have a favorite segment or episode? Let us know.

Actor George Takei first came to fame as a young Sulu in the original Star Trek series. But he’s since become an active voice in promoting equal rights for LGBT people. We spoke to Takei earlier this year when the play “Allegiance,” was showing in Atlanta movie theaters. The play is inspired by Takei’s experiences in a U.S. internment camp during World War II.

We add two more songs to our Georgia Playlist. Philip Frobos is the bassist and vocalist for the Atlanta band OMNI. They released their second album, “Multi-Task,” last month. Frobos brings us tunes by Love Tractor and Current Rage.

David Goldman / AP Photo

In Georgia, sports are a way of life. The fandom surrounding sports often influences the psyche of both the individual and the groups obsessing over teams. Erin Tarver explores how sports can influence our values in her new book, “The ‘I’ in Team: Sports Fandom and the Reproduction of Identity.” She talks to us, along with Vicki Michaelis, Professor of Sports Journalism at the University of Georgia.

Earlier this month the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments that could change how Georgia lawmakers draw districts for Congress and state legislative seats. The case hinges on allegations of gerrymandering in two Georgia districts. Plaintiffs claim these districts were redrawn to discriminate against black voters, and create an advantage for Republicans. We break down what gerrymandering really is, and the incredible impact it has on the nation.

We continue our coverage of gerrymandering in Georgia with Kennesaw State’s Kerwin Swint, a political science professor.

Musical acts from all over the world come to Atlanta this weekend for the Afropunk Music Festival. One group performing is Georgia’s own, Algiers. Their latest album is called “The Underside of Power.” GPB’s Sean Powers catches up with lead singer, Franklin James Fisher.

The winners of this year’s Nobel Prizes were announced last week. Last month, slightly less prestigious awards honored the funny side of scientific discovery. The Ig Nobel Prizes have been awarded annually since 1991 to honor achievements that “first make people laugh, and then make them think.” We talk about silly science with Marc Abraham, an organizer and founder of the Ig Nobel Prizes. Also with us is Georgia Tech doctoral student Patricia Yang, who won an Ig Nobel Prize in 2015.

Adult Swim

"Squidbillies" is the third longest running animated show on Atlanta-based Adult Swim. The series is based on the show creators’ experiences here in Georgia – with a cast of anthropomorphic redneck squids. The eleventh season of "Squidbillies" premieres this Sunday, Oct. 15, on Adult Swim. We talk with the show co-creators, Dave Willis and Jim Fortier.

Jake Gee

We add two more songs to our Georgia Playlist. Gresham Cash is the guitarist and front man for the Georgia band Oak House. Cash brings us tunes by Deerhunter and the Allman Brothers.

Oak House performs at the Earl in Atlanta on Saturday, Oct. 14, at 10 p.m. 

Two major puppy mill were busted in Georgia this year. One in April rescued more than 350 animals. Last month in Fulton County, authorities found 60 dogs, 53 lizards, a rabbit and a piranha at another site. We talk with Jessica Rock, Founding Partner at Animal Law Source.

On Monday, the Atlanta City Council voted unanimously to weaken punishments for the possession of marijuana. Now, those caught with an ounce or less will not serve jail time, and will be fined no more than $75. We talk about this monumental move with Andrea Young, Executive Director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia. 

Georgia’s campus carry law allows firearms on all public college campuses, minus a few excepted spaces. We hear about the research into the effectiveness of such laws with Matthew Boedy, a Professor of English at the University of North Georgia. Also Mark Rosenberg, former President and CEO of the Task Force for Global Health.

David Goldman / AP Photo

The top American universities admit more students from the top one percent of earners than the bottom 60 percent combined. Those numbers contradict the U.S. News rankings, which seem to reward schools contributing to the rich-poor gap. Georgia State University is a national model for graduating low-income students, even though it dropped 30 spots in the U.S. News rankings. We talk with Tim Renick, Vice President for Student Success Programs at GSU.

On Tuesday, the former head of Atlanta-based Equifax apologized many times during a hearing before a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee  about the company’s massive data breach. The hack exposed more than 145 million people to possible ID theft. We check in with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Tamar Hallerman, who’s been following the Equifax scandal from Washington.

Hurricane Maria slammed the entire U.S. territory of Puerto Rico two weeks ago. Maria came hard on the havoc of other storms, leaving the entire island dreadfully damaged, flooded, without basic necessities, and difficulty distributing what they did have, and no electricity. Nearly 90,000 Puerto Ricans live in Georgia, nearly a fourth of them in Cobb and Gwinnett Counties. Cynthia Román-Hernández is a Managing Director with the Latin American Association in Atlanta, and her husband Juan Carlos Rodriguez is an assistant professor at Georgia Tech.

Georgia has submitted a new plan to hold public schools accountable for student performance. The updates are more lenient on testing. Governor Deal says intense testing is critical to hold schools accountable, but the state Superintendent says we must avoid a “measure, pressure, and punish” culture. We talk with Ty Tagami of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Also Dana Rickman, Director of Policy and Research with the Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education.

Dirk Lammers / AP Photo

Georgia has submitted a new plan to hold public schools accountable for student performance. The updates are more lenient on testing. Governor Deal says intense testing is critical to hold schools accountable, but the state superintendent says we must avoid a “measure, pressure, and punish” culture.

Dream Culture

We add two more tunes to our ever-growing Georgia Playlist. Evan Leima is the frontman and guitarist for Athens-based Dream Culture. Leima brings us tracks by Washed Out and Warehouse.

 

 

Ryan McFadin / GPB

The Breakroom returns! We discuss silent protests at NFL games, Trump’s antagonizing North Korea, and Twitter’s decision to expand the length of tweets to 280 characters. We also remember some hard goodbyes, Saudi Arabia, and critique HuffPost’s Atlanta Playlist. Joining us this week are Roxanne Donovan, Hector Fernandez, Tomika DePriest, and Greg Williams.

 

 

In the wake of back-to-back natural disasters, there’s doubt about the willingness and ability of insurance companies to handle a flood of claims for destroyed property. We sit down with an investigative reporter for the Atlanta Journal Constitution, Carrie Teegardin, to discuss her in-depth reporting, part of our occasional series, “AJC Investigates.”  We add two more tunes to our ever-growing Georgia Playlist. Evan Leima is the frontman and singer for Athens-based Dream Culture. They perform at Seeds of Sound Festival in Sparta this Saturday, Sept.

Adult Swim

In 2013, "Rick And Morty" launched on Atlanta-based Adult Swim. Since then, the animated show has developed a cult-like following, revered for its witty banter and sci-fi prowess. Justin Roiland and Dan Harmon co-created "Rick And Morty," but never imagined it would reach the level of success it has enjoyed.

Cat ownership is subject to a lot of debate. Inside or outside, claws or no? We’ll hear how GPB’s Sean Powers comes nose to nose with the conflict, then we talk with Barbara King, an Emerita Professor of Anthropology at the College of William and Mary, about the ethics of cat ownership.

Athens-based band, Drive-by Truckers was co-founded by friends Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley in 1996. We revisit an interview with Patterson Hood about the band’s latest album, “American Band,” before Drive-by Truckers play this Friday, Sept. 29, at Atlanta’s Variety Playhouse.

Indigo Girls -- no “the” -- have been hits since their first release in 1985. One of the most successful and influential Georgia-formed groups, the folk rock pair have gone platinum and won a Grammy, too. They have a show tonight, Sept. 27, at Atlanta Symphony Hall with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. We revisit an interview with one half of the group, Amy Ray.

The Atlanta Music Project

American orchestras have a diversity problem. People of color make up only about four percent of the musicians in U.S. symphonies. The Atlanta Music Project is looking to change that. They provide free instruments and lessons to underserved kids in southwest Atlanta, in the hopes of getting them interested in classical music careers.

Last week President Trump disparaged professional football players for kneeling during the national anthem. The president’s comments generated gestures of unity at NFL games Sunday. The Atlanta Falcons were among the many players, coaches and owners who locked arms during the anthem to protest racial injustice. Fifty years ago two Olympic athletes brought this kind of silent protest to the medal podium. Track stars Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists during the ceremony.

Rounder Records

Before Gregg Allman passed away this summer, he recorded an album packed with new material. The posthumously released “Southern Blood” came out earlier this month. The heart-shattering album reflects on Allman's life as his terminal illness overtook him. We listen to the record and talk with Allman's longtime friend Chank Middleton and Allman's guitarist and band leader Scott Sharrard.

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