Trevor Young

On Second Thought Producer

Trevor Young currently works as a Producer for "On Second Thought" with Celeste Headlee at Georgia Public Broadcasting. 

Ways to Connect

Whitney Chirdon / GPB

The Breakroom gang weighs in on the latest revelations about the White House and the quick fix of I-85. Then, we discuss the ongoing Uber vs. taxi debate, whether social media is healthy, and the return of "Roseanne." The Breakroom this week includes Kathy Lohr, HB Cho, Jessica Szilagyi and Robbie Medwed.

drpavloff / Foter

In recent weeks, conservative voices have generated controversy over speaking appearances at colleges. Betsy DeVos, Ann Coulter and Richard Spencer have all sparked protests. We ask leaders at Georgia schools how they’re preparing to balance free speech and safety issues. Oglethorpe University President Lawrence Schall joins us with Agnes Scott College Associate Vice President Kijua Sanders-McMurtry.

Courtesy of Chuck Klosterman

Writer Chuck Klosterman has met a lot of interesting people. He’s interviewed famous film actors and rock stars for Esquire, ESPN, and the New York Times Magazine. A new collection of his writing is called “Chuck Klosterman X: A Highly Specific, Defiantly Incomplete History of the Early 21st Century.” Chuck joins us ahead of an appearance in Atlanta next Monday, May 22.

John Davisson/Invision / AP Photo

Georgia lost a music legend earlier this month. Colonel Bruce Hampton died May 1, shortly after his 70th  birthday celebration at the Fox Theatre in Atlanta. Hampton was widely regarded as the granddaddy of the jam-band scene. He played with pioneering acts like the The Hampton Grease Band and Aquarium Rescue Unit. We pay homage to the great Colonel Bruce with memories from Oteil Burbridge, Jeff Sipe, and Jesse Jarnow.

Coast Guard News / Foter

A new study from Georgia Tech takes a deep look into the consequences of the National Football League draft. Over the last decade, the NFL draft has become a spectacle for viewers and fans. But as the pool increases, the average player’s career length is decreasing. The draft has also become a point of strategy, one that can set a team up for a season of success, or failure. We talk with Georgia Tech professor John Stasko, and GPB Sports Correspondent Jon Nelson.

PHOTOS: Shaky Knees Fest '17 Day Three

May 15, 2017
Jeff Harris / GPB

And so it ends...the fifth Shaky Knees concluded Sunday with sparks and cheers. See the last batch of photos in the slideshow above.

Mikhail Chekmezov / Flickr

Empathy is a crucial human ability. It’s the basis of the golden rule: do unto others as you’d have them do unto you. And yet, empathy is not all that well understood. Many people confuse empathy with sympathy, and they are not the same. Since this is a term that’s often used, but generally misunderstood, we break it down for you.

PHOTOS: Shaky Knees Fest '17 Day Two

May 14, 2017
Jeff Harris / GPB

Shaky Knees Day Two is a wrap! Check out all our photos in the slideshow above!

PHOTOS: Shaky Knees Fest '17 Day One

May 13, 2017
Jeff Harris / GPB

The first day of the Fifth Annual Shaky Knees Festival is a wrap! Check out the slideshow for a recap of all the bands that jammed out in Centennial Olympic Park on Friday. 

Penguin Random House

Heck, everyone loves tacos -- or so says the new children’s book, “Dragons Love Tacos Two.” In this sequel, the unthinkable occurs: every taco in the world disappears. And it’s up to dragons -- the biggest taco fans -- to remedy this catastrophe and save the tacos. We hear from the duo behind the book series: writer Adam Rubin and illustrator Daniel Salmieri.

Marion Fregeac

Fantastic Negrito is best known to the world as the first-ever winner of NPR Music's Tiny Desk Contest. But the blues musician has been working for years to get wide recognition. The next step will be a performance at the Shaky Knees Festival in Atlanta this Saturday. We talk with Fantastic Negrito about his rise from the ground up.

Photo Courtesy Of Ron Gallo

Ron Gallo doesn't care if you like him. The Nashville musician has bigger things to worry about, such as the absurdity of human nature and the question of greater purpose in the universe. He channels those thoughts with quick, punky energy on-stage. Ron will bring his philosophically driven jams to the Shaky Knees Festival this Sunday, so we caught up with him in the studio.

Josh Telles

Korean-American indie rock band Run River North will perform at the Shaky Knees Festival in Atlanta this weekend. The band is currently touring to promote their latest album, "Drinking From A Salt Pond." We catch up with lead vocalist Alex Hwang and guitarist Daniel Chae ahead of their Shaky Knees show this Saturday.

Photo Courtesy of Anna Vocino

Actress and writer Anna Vocino wears many hats. She’s appeared in side roles on shows like “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” and “The Office,” and has done voice-over work for numerous cartoons and video games. She’s also a passionate food writer, and blogs about her struggle with celiac disease. Her new book, “Eat Happy,” explores the ways to eat gluten-free, and have it taste good, too.

Malingering / Flickr

A recent article from The New Yorker magazine called barbecue the most political food in America. The author argues barbecue has its roots in racism and discrimination. We discuss this history with Chuck Reece, editor of the Bitter Southerner. Also joining us are food writers Michael Twitty, and Kathleen Purvis of the Charlotte Observer.

A class at Georgia Tech focuses on the history and community of Auburn Avenue in Atlanta. The neighborhood was home to Martin Luther King Jr. and an important setting for the civil rights movement in the 1960s. Now, Georgia Tech students are documenting that community, while trying to raise awareness of issues there. We speak with Professor Nassim JafariNaimi, and students Nick Tippens and Ali Yildirim.

anoldent / Foter

A group of private landowners wants to develop 1,000 acres on Georgia’s Cumberland Island. Opponents say the rezoning would negatively impact wildlife and tourism.

PremierofAlberta / Foter

The Good Samaritan bill became Georgia law three years ago. The bill equips first responders with the drug Naloxone to reverse opioid overdoses, and gives amnesty to those who report drug related health emergencies. We talk about results of the law with Georgia Health News Editor Andy Miller, and Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition Ambassador Mona Bennett.

GPB

New research from the Southern Poverty Law Center and Emory University finds cases of alleged bias in the Atlanta Immigration Court. The AIC denies asylum to 98 percent of seekers, by far the highest rate of any immigration court in the nation.

Jason Thrasher

Athens Photographer Jason Thrasher has been shooting the music scene there for decades. His new book “Athens Potluck” captures the early gigs of R.E.M., Pylon, and the Drive-By Truckers. Thrasher adds two more tunes to our essential Georgia Playlist.

R. Andrew Lepley

Christian McBride is a master of jazz bass. The four-time Grammy Award winner has performed with Pat Metheny, Chick Corea, and many others. We talk with him ahead of a performance at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta on Saturday, April 29.

Whitney Chirdon / GPB

The Breakroom gang is back. We’ll take aim at the controversy over Confederate monuments in New Orleans and discuss whether parents should be bringing their kids to work. Plus, we talk about a ban on saggy pants and decide whether or not the White House Correspondent’s Dinner is still relevant.

Rab's Da / Foter

A recent study by WalletHub found Georgia ranks eighth in the country for the “most stressed out states.” And after all our highway issues in Atlanta, some of us are feeling even more frayed. We asked our co-workers here at GPB what’s stressing them out. It’s time to open the Gripe Bag. 

Santa Elena History Center

Last summer, archaeologists discovered a 440-year-old Spanish fort buried underground at Parris Island, South Carolina. When Fort San Marcos was built, it was near the Spanish settlement of Santa Elena. Victor Thompson is half of the team that discovered the fort. He’s Director of the Center for Archaeological Sciences at the University of Georgia in Athens, and our guest. 

Courtesy William Wegman / © William Wegman

You may not have heard William Wegman’s name, but you’ve probably seen his dogs. He loves to photograph those Weimaraners, and they’ve become icons in their own right. A new exhibit called "William Wegman: Improved Photographs" opens at the Telfair Museum in Savannah on May 12. We talk with the artist and ask him what's new.

Photo Courtesy of Jon Ossoff

A Republican super PAC is paying for attack ads against a Democratic candidate in the Sixth District race. One ad claims Jon Ossoff’s ties to media outlet Al Jazeera link him to terrorism and anti-Western ideologies. We talk about the ethics of campaign ads with Andra Gillespie, Professor of Political Science at Emory University.

DoDEA Communications / Foter

As the population of Latino students increases, the number of Latino teachers in the workforce is still scarce. Gainesville and Hall County are struggling to find teachers who reflect the student population. We talk about this with Julio Cabanas, an Assistant Principal at Fair Street Elementary in Gainesville. Cabanas is also Gainesville’s first Hispanic school administrator.

©Nina Subin

Dominican-American novelist Junot Diaz published “The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao” a decade ago. The book won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2007. When he’s not writing, he teaches college students--he formerly taught Freedom University here in Georgia, which offers post-secondary education to undocumented immigrants.

We speak with Junot Diaz ahead of a lecture at Emory University at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 12th.

Kevin Christopher Burke / Foter

A fraternity at the University of Georgia was recently suspended for a year for misconduct during a hazing ceremony. A ban on new bars opening in Downtown Athens took effect in February. All this points to a problem with partying.

Jim Brit

Actor Stephen Tobolowsky has appeared in over 100 movies and 200 TV shows. His most notable roles include Stu Beggs on Showtime’s "Californication" and Ned Ryerson" in the classic 1993 film "Groundhog Day." Tobolowsky was raised in the Jewish faith, but has struggled with his identity since an early age. He writes about it in his new book “My Adventures With God,” which comes out April 18.

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