Trevor Young

On Second Thought Producer

Trevor Young currently works as a Producer for "On Second Thought" with Celeste Headlee at Georgia Public Broadcasting. 

Ways to Connect

Morris Publishing announced this month it would sell ownership of 11 daily newspapers in the Southeast to Gatehouse Media. The sale includes large local Georgia papers like the Augusta Chronicle, the Athens Banner-Herald, and the Savannah Morning News. We talk about what’s behind the sale with Carolyn Carlson, a Professor of Communications and Media at Kennesaw State University. And Phil Kent, CEO of Insider Advantage, and a former editor at the Augusta Chronicle.

For the first time in over four decades, West Point authorized an updated text on military history in 2014. This one focuses on the tactics and consequences of the Civil War. We revisit a conversation with Colonel Ty Seidule, one of the book’s editors.

The Darlington School

Nine Georgia men have filed a lawsuit against the Darlington School in Rome, alleging sexual abuse by former teacher Roger Stifflemore. The case has caused state lawmakers to propose expanding the Hidden Predator Act to give more time for victims to sue their abusers, and also allow them to sue institutions.

About 30 years ago, the “Brotherman” comic series paved the way for today’s black comics and superhero movement. Atlanta-based artist Dawud Anyabwile is the co-creator of Brotherman. We talk with him about a new exhibit in Atlanta chronicling Brotherman’s universe.

It’s been two weeks since the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. The violence there renewed conversations about race relations, and have left some searching for answers on how to de-radicalize people. That’s something Shannon Martinez of Athens knows firsthand. She was a skinhead for several years, but managed to leave that life behind her.  We talk with her and Sammy Rangel of Life After Hate, a group that helps people move away from hate and violent extremism.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Atlanta Theater Director Kenny Leon has produced theater versions of “The Wiz,” "Hairspray," and “Fences.” He also founded Atlanta's True Colors Theatre Company. Now, Leon is set to teach master classes on film and theater production at Kennesaw State University. Kenny Leon joins us in the studio to discuss teaching and his latest work.

Mark Fischer / Foter

For centuries, groups in the South have sought to secede from the United States. More than 150 years after the Civil War, groups like the League of the South are pushing again to break from the Union. We talk about how serious we should take calls for secession with Roxanne Donovan, Psychology Professor at Kennesaw State University. And Trey Hood, Political Science Professor at the University of Georgia in Athens.

Foter

The South is a proud place. Southerners are notorious for their love of their heritage and culture. But following the events in Charlottesville, Virginia, it’s becoming more difficult to separate the South from its roots in racism and white supremacy.

For centuries, groups in the South have sought to secede from the United States. More than 150 years after the Civil War, groups like the League of the South are pushing again to break from the Union. We talk about how serious we should take calls for secession with Roxanne Donovan, Psychology Professor at Kennesaw State University. And Trey Hood, Political Science Professor at the University of Georgia in Athens.

First, Atlanta has a healthy appetite for improv. This week Dad’s Garage Theater welcomes Scott Adsit. You may know him best as Pete Hornberger on the show “30 Rock.” Scott joined us earlier this week to discuss the art of comedy.

Then, Atlanta-based producer Will Packer’s new movie “Girls Trip” is doing quite well. It cost about $19 million to make, and it’s grossed more than $90 million since opening in theaters last month. We talked with Will Packer last week about making hit movies with diverse casts, and his television project “Black America.”

First, rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend brought together many factions of the white supremacist movement, and put a younger generation of white supremacists in the spotlight. Reporter A.C. Thompson has been tracking hate groups for ProPublica’s “Documenting Hate” project. He joins us to talk about his reporting, and what he saw in Virginia. We also talk with University of Maryland psychology professor Arie Kruglanski, who studies the mental processes behind radicalization, de-radicalization, and terrorism.

Music for American films is produced almost entirely in New York or Los Angeles. But as the film industry booms in Georgia, the demand for locally sourced musicians is growing. The newly formed Peach State Orchestra looks to meet that demand by becoming the first premiere movie scoring orchestra in Georgia. We talk with founder and conductor Phillip Allen.

“Shadow Of The Lions” is the debut novel of Atlanta author Christopher Swann. His thriller novel explores the life of a young man named Matthias as he reckons with the disappearance of a close friend. Christopher Swann is an English Professor at Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School, and our guest.

Chris Swann will appear at the Atlanta History Center on Thursday, August 17 at 7 p.m.

First, a new report finds chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in 110 of 111 brains of deceased former NFL players. The study adds to a  growing body of knowledge about the connection between contact sports and brain-damaging concussions. We talk with Steve Broglio, Director of the NeuroTrauma Research Laboratory at the University of Michigan.

We also talk with former Atlanta Falcons linebacker Buddy Curry, who is working to improve football education with his group, “Kids & Pros.”

First, when Donald Trump began his campaign in 2015, few thought he would climb to the nation’s highest office. But Jared Yates Sexton realized Trump was onto something. He was one of the first people to attend and report on Trump rallies. Sexton teaches creative writing at Georgia Southern University, and has a new book: “The People Are Going To Rise Like The Waters Upon Your Shore.” He joins us for an hour exploring changes in the American psyche.

When Donald Trump began his campaign in 2015, few thought he would climb to the nation’s highest office. But Jared Yates Sexton realized Trump was onto something. He was one of the first people to attend and report on Trump rallies. Sexton teaches creative writing at Georgia Southern University, and has a new book: “The People Are Going To Rise Like The Waters Upon Your Shore.” He joins us to explore the changes in the American psyche leading up to Trump.

Alik Keplicz / AP Photo

Donald Trump’s politics have often been described as “populist.” Populism, by definition, is the belief that average people should have more say in governance than the wealthy elite. But the term can be as misleading; Bernie Sanders was also called a populist. Since the word can cause some confusion, we break it down. Then we’re joined by a populism expert: Cas Mudde, a professor in the Department of International Affairs at the University of Georgia. And Jared Yates Sexton, a professor at Georgia Southern University.

Steve Helber / AP Photo

Since the November election, the political drama in America has only heightened. Carol Anderson is a professor of African-American Studies at Emory University. Her latest book, “White Rage,” points to racial tensions as a cause of growing division. We assemble a panel to discuss what has changed since Trump took office, and how Americans are shifting their views. Also with us is Bret Stephens, conservative columnist for the New York Times. And Jared Yates Sexton, author and a professor of writing at Georgia Southern University.

First, if you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on TV’s “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” and he has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. Audiences in Atlanta can see him live Friday, August 11, and tomorrow August 12 at Dad’s Garage. We talk with Colin Mochrie.

Bob Gruen

We add a couple more tunes to the Georgia Playlist, our essential list of songs that best represent Georgia. Today we feature Athens-band Shehehe, who release a new album, called “Endless Summer,” this weekend [August 12]. Drummer and singer Jason Fusco brings us his picks for the Georgia Playlist, including tunes by The Glands and Illegal Drugs.

Shehehe performs at the 40 Watt in Athens this Saturday at 9 p.m.

First, imagine being in outer space with two sassy robots, and being forced to watch really bad science fiction movies with them. That’s the premise of the cult classic TV series, Mystery Science Theater 3000. The show is on the road this weekend [August 12] in Atlanta. We talk with series creator, Joel Hodgson.

David McClister

Country artist Lucinda Williams first achieved commercial breakthrough with her 1998 album, “Car Wheels on a Gravel Road.” She’s won three Grammy Awards, and was named one of the greatest country artists of all time by Rolling Stone magazine this year. Now, she’s on tour promoting her 12th studio album, “The Ghosts of Highway 20,” which reflects on her time living in Georgia. 

David Goldman / AP Photo

A recent study by the non-profit Prosperity Now finds white-owned businesses make, on average, nearly ten times as much as African-American-owned businesses in the South. It also shows black business owners have a harder time finding mentorship and capital. We discuss with Dr. Dennis Kimbro, Professor of Business at Clark Atlanta University.

The Savannah Bananas are back in the playoffs this week. This comes after Savannah’s collegiate team broke the league record for attendance, again. We talk with team president, Jared Orton. Then, we hear from some number one fans.

The personal finance site Nerd Wallet says Atlanta is the nation’s best place for African-American-owned businesses. Savannah and Columbus scored high marks as well. We spoke with Cindy Yang from NerdWallet.

First, for years, we’ve seen gorillas come to life on the screen, in everything from “Planet of the Apes,” to “Congo,” and “The Jungle Book.” But these cinematic portrayals aren’t all that accurate. University of Georgia anthropology professor Roberta Salmi is on a mission to change Hollywood’s depiction of gorillas. We talk with her about studying their behavior, and working as a consultant on the new film, “War for the Planet of the Apes.”

Old Shoe Woman / Foter

This week marks the beginning of school for many districts in Metro Atlanta. But as of mid-June, there were 1,400 vacancies in schools across the city. DeKalb County alone lost 900 teachers at the end of last school year.

Today [August 7] marks 50 years since Jackson County DA Floyd Hoard was murdered. He was one of the first government prosecutors murdered in the line of the duty in the United States. The event changed the course of law enforcement and politics in Jackson County and led to then-Governor Maddox giving the Georgia Bureau of Investigation jurisdiction in Jackson County.

First, August 7th marks 50 years since Jackson County DA Floyd Hoard was murdered. He was one of the first government prosecutors murdered in the line of the duty in the United States. The event changed the course of law enforcement and politics in Jackson County and led to then-Governor Maddox giving the Georgia Bureau of Investigation jurisdiction in Jackson County. Floyd Hoard's son, Richard Hoard, wrote a book about his father's murder a few years ago.

krnjn / Foter

The average cost of college tuition has jumped by 77 percent over the last 10 years. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is collaborating with The Hechinger Report in New York to determine the consequences of rising student debt. The first in a series of investigative articles rolled out on Sunday. We talk to Meredith Kolodner, Staff Writer for The Hechinger Report.

First, the average cost of college tuition has jumped by 77 percent over the last 10 years. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is collaborating with The Hechinger Report in New York to determine the consequences of rising student debt. The first in a series of investigative articles will roll out this Sunday. We talk to Meredith Kolodner, Staff Writer for The Hechinger Report.

Pages