Trevor Young

On Second Thought Producer

Trevor Young currently works as a Producer for "On Second Thought" with Celeste Headlee at Georgia Public Broadcasting. 

Ways to Connect

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a case against the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, alleging the company discriminates against older workers by not hiring them in the first place. This leaves in place a ruling from Atlanta’s 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. We discuss the implications with Paul Chichester, an Atlanta-based employment attorney. And Peter Gosselin, contributing reporter for ProPublica.

First, Sucheta Rawal is a children’s book author on a mission. She created Beato, a world traveling cat, who’s part of a broader plan to raise cultural awareness in both kids and adults. Her latest book is “Beato Goes to Indonesia,” which just hit the shelves. The author joins us in the studio.

In recent years, newspapers and magazines have moved to all digital formats. But one magazine in Georgia is making a print comeback. This year Decatur-based Paste Magazine started a quarterly magazine that looks and feels different. The second edition just came out. We learn more about the magazine’s reboot with founder and editor-in-chief, Josh Jackson.

First, the City of Atlanta plans to raise the minimum wage for city workers to $15 an hour. Following a national trend, Atlanta is the first such place in Georgia to make the move. But will a minimum wage increase hurt or help the working class? We talk about the pros and cons with Kristy Offitt, Employment Litigator for Ogletree Deakins in Atlanta. And Tom Smith, Assistant Professor of Finance at Emory University.

Foter

Georgia is facing a huge increase in youth suicides this year. More than 20 known deaths so far in 2017 reveal a record trend, and no clusters or identifiable causes have been attributed to the troubling numbers. We talk about the issue with Trebor Randle, Special Agent for the Georgia Bureau of Investigation’s Child Fatality Review Unit. And Tim Elmore, president of the non-profit Growing Leaders, which works to raise awareness about teen mental health.

 

 

David Goldman / AP Photo

The City of Atlanta announced last month it would raise the minimum wage for city workers to $13 an hour. Following a national trend, Atlanta is the first such place in Georgia to make the move. And like other cities, $13 is just a starting point, gradually going up to $15 by the 2020 Fiscal Year. But will a minimum wage increase hurt or help the working class?

Khalid Kamau

South Fulton is Georgia’s newest city. But one of its recently elected councilmen says the local media couldn’t care less. In a recent letter to the editor of GeorgiaPol, Khalid Kamau charges news outlets with a bias against the African-American community. Kamau brings us a commentary.

First, the Smithsonian Channel just launched a new series called “America in Color.” The five part program features historical film footage from the 1920s through the 1960s, presented in HD and with the addition of color. We talk about the show’s Georgia ties with the Executive Producer, John Cavanagh.

Homeless Pets are everywhere in Georgia. The issue has been labeled the biggest challenge facing shelter and rescue operations in our state. We spoke with Gloria Dorsey, vice president of Community Education at the Atlanta Humane Society. We also heard from Jessica Rock, a founding partner at Animal Law Source.  

A new café in Atlanta caters to cats and their humans. At Java Cats Café, you can order coffee and hang out with adoptable cats. GPB’s Sean Powers stopped by to learn more about this purrfectly feline coffee shop. 

Alex E. Proimos / Foter

The U.S. Senate’s proposed health care overhaul is likely to cut health coverage for poor people and children. We talk about what’s in the bill and the potential consequences with Georgia Health News Editor Andy Miller, Georgia Budget & Policy Institute Health Policy Analyst Laura Harker, and Karoline Mortensen, Professor of Health Sector Management and Policy at the University of Miami.

First, President Trump recently unveiled new trade restrictions with Cuba. We look at how this will impact Georgia’s poultry industry. Joining us is James Sumner, President of the USA Poultry & Egg Export Council and Marisa Anne Pagnattaro, Associate Dean for UGA’s Terry College of Business.

Wikimedia Commons

A recent survey by the University of Georgia finds that 16 percent of Georgians don’t have access to a high-speed internet connection. The vast majority of those effected live in the state’s rural regions. We talk about broadband deserts with UGA’s Associate Director of the Carl Vinson Institute of Government Eric McRae.

Finally, broadband deserts are a political issue as well. Kyle Wingfield, a conservative columnist for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, brings us a commentary.

First, according to a recent lawsuit, hundreds of students at Worth County High School in Sylvester, Georgia were the subject of a humiliating pat-down by local sheriff's deputies. The case raises questions about privacy on school campuses. We speak with Robyn McDougle of the Commonwealth Educational Policy Institute.

Paul Malinowski / Foter

One of America’s most beloved species is making a comeback. The bald eagle was nearly extinct, before being labeled endangered in the 1960s. But a record number of bald eagle nests have been documented in Georgia this year, according to the state Department of Natural Resources. 

First, walking might be good for your health, but maybe not so good for your safety. Last year, 236 pedestrians were killed in Georgia. That’s a 40 percent increase in just two years. We discuss this with Sally Flocks, President and CEO of PEDS, which advocates for pedestrian safety in Georgia.

Transportation for America / Foter

Walking might be good for your health, but maybe not so good for your safety. Last year, 236 pedestrians were killed in Georgia. That’s a 40 percent increase in just two years. We discuss this with Sally Flocks, President and CEO of PEDS, which advocates for pedestrian safety in Georgia.

David Barbe is a legend in the Athens music scene. He runs the Chase Park Transduction recording studio, and has produced albums for Drive-By Truckers, Deerhunter, New Madrid, and many others. His new solo album, “10th of Seas,” is slated for release in August.

A new film called “All Eyez On Me” celebrates the life of rapper Tupac Shakur on what would’ve been his 46th birthday. The Atlanta University Center Robert W. Woodruff Library is home to a huge collection of Tupac’s works, including handwritten manuscripts, writings from his diary, song lyrics, and other personal items. We talk with hip-hop scholar Nsenga Burton about the collection and Tupac’s legacy.

First, retail stores are disappearing, but the economy’s not the bad guy. Rising pressure from online shopping is causing brick and mortar stores to file for bankruptcy at a record pace in 2017. We’ll talk about how this retail downturn is affecting Georgia with Amy Wenk, reporter for The Atlanta Business Chronicle, and John Brown, Associate Professor of Economics at Georgia Southern University.

Ryan McFadin / GPB

The Breakroom gang returns to discuss coconut oil, workplace sexism, and the odd partnership of Bill Maher and Ted Nugent. We also talk about some unusual stories surrounding prisons and whether Gene Simmons can justifiably claim ownership of the “rock on” hand gesture. Guests include Christian Zsilavetz, Natalie Pawelski, Jessica Szilagyi, and Hector Fernandez.

Courtesy of Thayer Sarrano / Curtis Wayne Millard Studio

All this week we get additions to the essential Georgia playlist from musicians playing at AthFest over the weekend, June 23-25. Today’s picks come from Athens singer/songwriter Thayer Sarrano. She adds some tunes from Don Chambers and Vic Chesnutt.

Thayer Sarrano performs at the Caledonia Lounge Friday at midnight as part of AthFest.

Ryan Myers

All this week, we get additions to the essential Georgia Playlist from musicians playing at AthFest over the weekend, June 23-25. Today’s picks come from Thomas Johnson, guitarist for Athens indie group Futurebirds. He adds some tunes from Star Room Boys and Now It's Overhead.

Futurebirds perform at AthFest on the Main Stage this Friday at 9 p.m.

Matt Rourke / AP Photo

June is Elder Abuse Awareness Month. The recently published America’s Health Rankings Senior Report finds the state now ranks 41st in the nation for senior health, down two spots from last year. We talk about the state of our elder care system with Kathy Floyd, Executive Director for the Georgia Council on Aging. And Glenn Ostir, Director of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Georgia.

Courtesy of Roadkill Ghost Choir

All this week we get additions to the essential Georgia playlist from musicians playing at AthFest over the weekend, June 23-25. Today’s picks come from Andrew Shepard of the Athens-based band Roadkill Ghost Choir. Picks include songs by Neutral Milk Hotel and Thayer Sarrano.

First, June 20 is World Refugee Day. The town of Clarkston, Georgia, is home to a large refugee population. It’s been called the Ellis Island of the South. We talked with Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry about how executive orders may impact the refugee community there. Then, two refugee friends from Syria share their stories. One of them arrived in Georgia right after 9/11, but before the Syrian civil war. The other is a young child, who came to the state last year. Besides calling Syria their birthplace, they share an even greater bond.

Courtesy of Hardy Morris

All this week we get additions to the essential Georgia Playlist from musicians playing at AthFest over the weekend, June 23-25. Today’s picks come from Athens-based singer/songwriter T. Hardy Morris. He waxes about music by James Brown and Robert Lester Folsom.

Hardy will perform the first night of AthFest at 1 a.m., June 23 at the Caledonia Lounge in Athens.

Up first, when you go into a hair salon or a cosmetics store, how much do you know about the products used on your skin or your hair? A recent study says there are dangerous chemicals in some of these products, particularly those marketed to black women. That study comes from the non-profit Environmental Working Group. Nneka Leiba is the group’s Deputy Director of Research.  She joins us with journalist A'Lelia Bundles and Atlanta hair stylist Latasha Gray.

massdistraction / Foter

A cluster of drug overdoses were reported earlier this month across Middle Georgia within a 48-hour window. As of last week, 30 overall cases and five deaths have been reported. Investigators believe a potent drug disguised as Percocet made its way across the region. We discuss the growing drug addiction crisis with Chris Hendry, Chief Medical Officer of Navicent Health.

Courtesy of Five Eight

All this week we get additions to the essential Georgia playlist from musicians playing at AthFest over the weekend, June 23-25. Athens band Five Eight is one staple in the town’s music scene. The group has performed with R.E.M., Pylon, and The Ramones. Frontman Mike Mantione adds two songs to our essential Georgia Playlist, including picks from The Glands and Vic Chesnutt. 

Five Eight performs at AthFest this Sunday on the Hull St. Stage at 6:30 p.m.

Photo Courtesy of Karcheik Sims-Alvarado

There’s no doubt Atlanta played a big role in the civil rights movement. Now, that history is archived in a new photo book called “Atlanta and the Civil Rights Movement, 1944 -1968.” We talk with historian Karcheik Sims-Alvarado about the significance of these photographs.

Dr. Sims-Alvarado will appear at the Atlanta History Center Saturday, June 17 at 11 a.m.

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