Trevor Young

On Second Thought Producer

Trevor Young currently works as a Producer for "On Second Thought" with Celeste Headlee at Georgia Public Broadcasting. 

Ways to Connect

One year ago, Atlanta-based Rapper Gucci Mane was released from prison. Since his release, he has been reinventing himself. He headlines a concert this weekend in Atlanta. We speak with Georgia-based hip-hop artist Makonnen and hip-hop scholar Regina Bradley about Gucci Mane’s influence on hip-hop in the South. Then, NPR Music hip-hop reporter Rodney Carmichael reviews Gucci Mane’s latest album, "Droptopwop."

As the race for a single congressional district draws national attention, we take an hour to examine Georgia’s changing electorate.

First, Cobb County is the last metro county in Georgia with a white majority. But it’s expected to become "majority minority"—more than 50 percent non-white residents—in the next four years. Politically, the reliably Republican county is shifting to largely Democratic, and may flip in the upcoming 6th Congressional District election. We talk about the changing electorate in Cobb with Andra Gillespie, Political Science Professor at Emory University.

David Goldman / AP Photo

Cobb County is the last metro county in Georgia with a white majority. But it’s expected to become "majority minority"—more than 50 percent non-white residents—in the next four years. Politically, the reliably Republican county is shifting to largely Democratic, and may flip in the upcoming 6th Congressional District election. We talk about the changing electorate in Cobb with Andra Gillespie, Political Science Professor at Emory University.

wallyg / Foter

A recent study finds Atlanta lags behind nearly every large city in the country when it comes to preserving historic architecture. A 1922 building in Vine City was recently slated for teardown, only to be partially saved as a YMCA center.

A recent study finds Atlanta lags behind nearly every large city in the country when it comes to preserving historic architecture. A 1922 building in Vine City was recently slated for teardown, only to be partially saved as a YMCA center. We talk about Atlanta’s flimsy historic preservation record with Sheffield Hale, President of the Atlanta History Center; and Mtamanika Youngblood, President of Sweet Auburn Works.

Courtesy of Mary Dearborn

Honored among America’s most famous novelists, Ernest Hemingway told a lot of stories. And his celebrity life generated some too. Mary Dearborn is the author of a new biography, and it is the first Hemingway biography penned by a woman. She’s in Atlanta on Tuesday, June 13, for a book signing at the Margaret Mitchell House.

LAWRENCE JACKSON / AP Photo

President Trump announced in a tweet he has tapped Atlanta Attorney Chris Wray to be the new FBI Director. Wray was the assistant attorney general leading the Justice Department's criminal division, from 2003 to 2005. The news came just a day before former FBI Director James Comey was scheduled to testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee.

fatseth / Foter

Thousands of Georgians were dropped from food stamp benefits this year – roughly 62 percent of the state’s recipients. The state told them they had an April 1 deadline to find a job, or lose their benefits. We talk with Melissa Johnson, Senior Policy Analyst for the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute. Also Craig Schneider, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution joins us.

Photo © Max Crace

Austin-based guitarist Eric Johnson is a legend in the music world. His 1990 hit “Cliffs of Dover” put him on the map. He’s performed with the likes of Cat Stevens, Mike Stern, Steve Vai, and Joe Satriani. We catch up with Eric Johnson ahead of a performance at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta tonight, June 8.

Sean Davis / Flickr

Public art is a booming cultural phenomenon in Atlanta. But many local artists are fighting to protect their art from being removed. The City of Atlanta has told muralists they must register work, or it will be painted over.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

As the name implies, Funk You draws a lot of inspiration from the great funk masters. The band hails from Augusta, Georgia, hometown of the funk legend, James Brown. 

GWilber / Foter

A new investigative report from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution finds about 12 percent of cops in Georgia schools were forced out of a previous job. The officers were terminated or investigated for a wide range of reasons, including chronically poor performance, lying to superiors, sexual misconduct and inappropriate use of force. But for some, a job in the school system means a second chance. We talk with Brad Schrade, Reporter for the AJC.

Whitney Chirdon / GPB

Happy Friday! The Breakroom returns to discuss controversies surrounding the Confederate flag, Trump’s cell phone, and… fruit juice. Then, we talk about the issues with Plant Vogtle, debate whether white guys should cook ethnic food, and vote on the best way to prepare shrimp. Our guests are Soumaya Khalifa, Greg Williams, Tomika DePriest, and Eric Segall.

courtesy of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation.© 2017 / The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

The High Museum of Art is presenting “Andy Warhol: Prints from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation” from June 3 through September 3. The retrospective features more than 250 prints and ephemera by Andy Warhol. We speak with Michael Rooks, Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art at the High Museum. 

Atlanta Comfort Women Memorial Task Force

"Comfort Women" refers to the women and girls trafficked by the Japanese Imperial Army during World War II. This was one of the largest known cases of human trafficking in modern history. A memorial was slated for the Center for Civil and Human Rights, but it backed out in March.

Joseph Guay

Nearly half of the Atlanta Ballet has left the company. Now, five members have formed their own, called the Terminus Modern Ballet Theater. We talk with co-founders John Welker and Tara Lee about what motivated the break, and the mission of the new group.

Natasha / Flickr

A new report finds more feature films were made in Georgia than any other market. In 2016, our film production even outpaced Hollywood. We discuss the film boom with AJC Buzz Blog writer Jennifer Brett, and Craig Miller of Craig Miller Productions in Atlanta.

mdghty / Foter

The Braves — The Gwinnett Braves, that is — are changing their name. And they want your submissions for name ideas. We discuss what’s behind the rebranding, and how it’s supposed to help the minor league team grow its fan base, with Sunny Mehta, Director of Clyde Group Sports; and Joel Feldman, an Atlanta-based attorney who focuses on sports branding.

John Amis / AP Photo

The first charter school in the United States opened up 25 years ago this fall. Since then, the idea of school choice has taken off. Charter schools can give students in struggling public schools more options, but only if those students apply to charter schools and get accepted. We’ll hear about how lotteries could address this in a feature from GPB’s Grant Blankenship.

Controversy has enveloped a recent column published by the Athens Banner-Herald. In the piece, titled “Radical Left Should Be Eradicated,” Robert Ringer writes: “As with ISIS, merely containing the Radical Left is not an acceptable alternative.

Michael Lionstar

“The Nix” is the debut novel by author Nathan Hill. It revolves around Samuel Andresen-Anderson, who finds a self-promoting reason to reunite with his mother after being abandoned as a child. She’s been accused of an unusual crime and Samuel gets hired to write a story. We talk with Nathan Hill ahead of an appearance at the Margaret Mitchell House on Monday night, May 22.

David Goldman / AP Photo

Earlier this month, the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law sued Georgia to extend voter registration in the congressional race for the 6th District. The group successfully extended the deadline, but now they want to permanently change Georgia law to reflect federal law. We talk about the controversy with Chris Joyner of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s Watchdog column and Julie Houk with LCCRUL.

Whitney Chirdon / GPB

The Breakroom gang weighs in on the latest revelations about the White House and the quick fix of I-85. Then, we discuss the ongoing Uber vs. taxi debate, whether social media is healthy, and the return of "Roseanne." The Breakroom this week includes Kathy Lohr, HB Cho, Jessica Szilagyi and Robbie Medwed.

drpavloff / Foter

In recent weeks, conservative voices have generated controversy over speaking appearances at colleges. Betsy DeVos, Ann Coulter and Richard Spencer have all sparked protests. We ask leaders at Georgia schools how they’re preparing to balance free speech and safety issues. Oglethorpe University President Lawrence Schall joins us with Agnes Scott College Associate Vice President Kijua Sanders-McMurtry.

Courtesy of Chuck Klosterman

Writer Chuck Klosterman has met a lot of interesting people. He’s interviewed famous film actors and rock stars for Esquire, ESPN, and the New York Times Magazine. A new collection of his writing is called “Chuck Klosterman X: A Highly Specific, Defiantly Incomplete History of the Early 21st Century.” Chuck joins us ahead of an appearance in Atlanta next Monday, May 22.

John Davisson/Invision / AP Photo

Georgia lost a music legend earlier this month. Colonel Bruce Hampton died May 1, shortly after his 70th  birthday celebration at the Fox Theatre in Atlanta. Hampton was widely regarded as the granddaddy of the jam-band scene. He played with pioneering acts like the The Hampton Grease Band and Aquarium Rescue Unit. We pay homage to the great Colonel Bruce with memories from Oteil Burbridge, Jeff Sipe, and Jesse Jarnow.

Coast Guard News / Foter

A new study from Georgia Tech takes a deep look into the consequences of the National Football League draft. Over the last decade, the NFL draft has become a spectacle for viewers and fans. But as the pool increases, the average player’s career length is decreasing. The draft has also become a point of strategy, one that can set a team up for a season of success, or failure. We talk with Georgia Tech professor John Stasko, and GPB Sports Correspondent Jon Nelson.

PHOTOS: Shaky Knees Fest '17 Day Three

May 15, 2017
Jeff Harris / GPB

And so it ends...the fifth Shaky Knees concluded Sunday with sparks and cheers. See the last batch of photos in the slideshow above.

Mikhail Chekmezov / Flickr

Empathy is a crucial human ability. It’s the basis of the golden rule: do unto others as you’d have them do unto you. And yet, empathy is not all that well understood. Many people confuse empathy with sympathy, and they are not the same. Since this is a term that’s often used, but generally misunderstood, we break it down for you.

PHOTOS: Shaky Knees Fest '17 Day Two

May 14, 2017
Jeff Harris / GPB

Shaky Knees Day Two is a wrap! Check out all our photos in the slideshow above!

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