Trevor Young

On Second Thought Producer

Trevor Young currently works as a Producer for "On Second Thought" with Celeste Headlee at Georgia Public Broadcasting. 

Ways to Connect

Brad Clinesmith / Foter

The motor vehicle death rate in Georgia has jumped by more than 30 percent since 2014. That’s the fifth highest jump in the nation, where fatalities comparatively rose only 14 percent. Those numbers come from a National Safety Council study released last month. The top three killers: speed, alcohol, and distraction.

We invited Natalie Dale, spokeswoman for the Georgia Department of Transportation, to shed some light on this.

Photo courtesy of John Harris

"Mr. Tuck And the 13 Heroes" is a new children's book about the first elementary school in Henry County to desegregate black and white students. In 1966, Fairview Elementary accepted thirteen students of color--an effort led by then principal, Brooks Tuck.

The author of the book is John Harris, whose father was friends with Mr. Tuck. We spoke with Harris along with the illustrator, his daughter Sophie Harris.

Design Feast / Foter

Personal finance site WalletHub conducted a recent study rating the healthiest and unhealthiest cities in the country. According to the study, Augusta, Georgia is one of the unhealthiest cities in the nation. This is based on a  number of factors, like the cost of a doctor visit, fruit and vegetable consumption, and fitness clubs per capita.

Cindy Hill / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Our in-house musician for the Friday broadcast of our live show from Savannah was Christopher Paul Stelling. He is performing at the Savannah Stopover Music Festival. Stelling is originally from Daytona Beach, Florida, but is now based in North Carolina. His debut album, “Songs of Praise and Scorn,” was released in 2012. Since then, he’s released two more records, and was invited to perform at NPR Music for a Tiny Desk Concert.

geoff_in_dubai / flickr

The port of Savannah leads the nation in exports of shark fins. The legal, but controversial commodity is used for shark fin soup, popular in parts of Asia. We talked about this with Mary Landers, reporter for Savannah Morning News.

A group of artists are coming together in Savannah to champion women’s rights. "The Personal is Political" is a new exhibit which explores “the relationship between personal experience and the political structures we navigate in our daily lives.” Art Rise Savannah and Planned Parenthood Southeast are teaming up for this exhibition, which opens Friday at the Art Rise Gallery. We talked about it with Heather McRae, exhibitions director at Art Rise Savannah. We also talked with Niki Johnson, whose work is featured in the exhibit.

Savannah Stopover Music Festival

The Savannah Stopover Music Festival has been going strong now for seven years. More than 80 bands will perform this weekend, including musicians Kishi Bashi and Julien Baker. Kayne Lanahan is the founder and organizer of the festival. We spoke with her about the festival and what she’s excited to see and hear this weekend.

Photo courtesy of Adult Swim

Atlanta-based Adult Swim is bringing back “Samurai Jack,” one of Cartoon Network’s most beloved animated shows. It ran for four seasons from 2001 to 2004, but the storyline never concluded. Samurai Jack has since become a cult classic in the animation world. And after much demand, the creators have revived it for Season Five.

We’re joined by Genndy Tartakovsky, the original creator; and Scott Wills, Art Director for the series.

uillaume Ziccarelli / Courtesy of Galerie Perrotin

Artist Daniel Arsham is best known for his work which blends architecture and performance art. His many installations across the country tend to stretch the boundaries of space and reality. Now, Arsham is bringing his work to Atlanta with three installations at the High Museum of Art.

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech is creating what it calls the most environmentally friendly building in the Southeast. It collects its own water and solar power, and uses them to satisfy energy needs and irrigate nearby vegetation.

This "living building" is on track to break ground later this year. We get a preview of this new structure from Howard Wertheimer, the school’s assistant vice president for capital planning and space management.

danielfoster437 / Foter

New reports from Atlanta-based health clinic CETPA find that Latino youth are being harassed and bullied more since last November’s presidential election. However, the Georgia Department of Education says it has not received complaints about bullying of Latino students in that time.

We try to sort all of this out with Georgia Health News editor Andy Miller. We also hear from Belisa Urbina, who is executive director of Ser Familia, which provides counseling and other services to Hispanic families in the metro Atlanta area.

Singer-songwriter Anthony Aparo is no stranger to the Atlanta music scene. He has been on the circuit as front man of Atlanta’s retro-electronic band Culture Culture since 2013. He's a regular musician on the bill for ATL Collective, a semi-monthly collaboration of local artists in Atlanta. He was also a member of the Athens folk-pop band Mr. Mustache.

Polybert49 / Foter

The label narcissist gets thrown around a lot, but it’s not usually used correctly. People often think "narcissistic" is a synonym for "arrogant," and that’s not true. Because narcissist is a word that many people use but often don’t understand, we break it down for you.

wallyg / Foter

Federal prosecutors are investigating bribes paid to Atlanta city officials in exchange for business contracts. Two contractors have already plead guilty to dishing out these bribes--though it is not clear who accepted them.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Scott Trubey has been covering the bribery scandal at City Hall. He joins us to help make sense of it all.

Olivia Reingold / GPB

The Breakroom returns with a week’s worth of crazy news to discuss. We’ll talk about why Democrats are meeting in Atlanta to elect a leader, and what it was about Milo Yiannopoulos’ recent controversy that tipped conservatives over the edge. Plus, we’ll look at research which show dogs have their own sense of morality, and another study which finds people who move around a lot lose out on friendships.

Our group this week includes:

Georgia National Guard / Foter

The Georgia Senate is one of  26 chambers in the nation that does not offer video streaming of committee meetings. Lawmakers often bar reporters and citizens from observing, and they don’t want other lawmakers recording the proceedings.

The Rocketeer / Foter

The Georgia Peach might well be the most iconic fruit to symbolize Georgia. You see it on license plates, billboards, and even government documents. But the peach is actually rare to Georgia, and not native to our agricultural climate.

Tom Okie is an Assistant Professor of History Education at Kennesaw State University. His new book, called “The Georgia Peach: Culture, Agriculture, and Environment in the American South,” explores the odd history of the fruit.

When you think of a fictional "hero," you might picture a strong, capable character. Someone who exudes confidence and is revered by those around them. But the heroes of Yiddish literature are very different.

Akhenaton06 / Foter

In 1967, the first African-American students were admitted to the Medical College of Georgia. Dr. Joseph Hobbs, one of the first black students to graduate, was the first black faculty member at the school.

Doctor Hobbs is now Chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia, and is organizing the 50th anniversary of desegregation at that college. He joins us from Augusta to discuss decades of work in elevating African-American doctors at the school.

Photo courtesy of Trudy Nan Boyce

Author and former Atlanta Police Officer Trudy Nan Boyce published her first novel, “Out of the Blues,” last year. That story follows the detective work of Sarah Alt--a.k.a “Salt”--as she investigates often gruesome crimes in the Atlanta area.

The second installment of Detective Salt’s story, called “Old Bones,” follows the fictional shooting of students at Spelman College. That book hits shelves February 21. Author Trudy Nan Boyce join us to discuss her new novel.

Raed Mansour / Foter

Repealing the Affordable Care Act could cost Georgia more than $20 million a year. It would also cost the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nearly $900 million—12 percent of the agency’s budget.

Keenan Jones / GPB

The Breakroom gang is back, and we’ve got a lot to talk about. We’ll discuss whether Super Bowl performances by Lady Gaga and The Schuyler Sisters need really be controversial. Plus, we’ll look at why the online dictionary is going viral, and how social media sites are stepping up to combat fake news. 

The Breakroom for today is:

TEDxKyoto / Flickr

Actor George Takei first warp sped to fame as a young Sulu in the original "Star Trek" series. But he’s since become an active voice in promoting equal rights for LGBT people.

Photo courtesy of Sheri Riley

Author Sheri Riley began her professional life at a record label in Atlanta. As marketing director at LaFace Records, she helped put numerous hip hop artists on the map -- TLC, Toni Braxton, and Usher, to name a few. But Sheri gave all that up to research and write about healthy lifestyles. She joins us to talk about her new book, “Exponential Living,” which comes out this week.

jontangerine / Foter

The battle for equal rights in America has centered around many modes of transportation--buses, trains, and streetcars for example. But one more form of travel should be added to that list: Airplanes. That’s the assertion of a new book from UGA Press called “Jim Crow Terminals: The Desegregation of American Airports.” The book covers the largely undocumented segregation at Southern airports in the 20th century. With us to discuss this is the author, Anke Ortlepp. She’s a Professor of North American and British History at the University of Kassel in Germany.

MarkMoz12 / Foter

A new report from housing site Trulia suggests house flipping activity has increased to the highest in a decade in 2016, with the Atlanta metro area ranking eighth in the country. They find that in 2016, 7.9 percent of all home sales in Atlanta were house flips, a modest 0.6 percent jump from the year before. We speak with Ralph McLaughlin, Chief Economist for Trulia, about these findings.

Photo courtesy of Kim Sorrells

Reverend Kim Sorrells grew up in conservative Alabama, and is now based in Atlanta. When Sorrells was in seminary, they, Sorrells' preferred pronoun, decided to transition to become gender-queer. Sorrells still faces daily struggles in reconciling Sorrells' identity with religious colleagues. We hear Sorrells' story, and a plight for a broader understanding of transgender individuals. 

DeeMo / Foter

Atlanta has seen a striking number of attacks by loose dogs in recent weeks. One such attack resulted in the death of a 6-year-old boy in southwest Atlanta. We talk about these events with Ellen Eldridge, a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. We also discuss how this may or may not affect the animal laws in the state with Jessica Rock, a Founding Partner at Animal Law Source.

mathiaswasik / Foter

Under a new, conservative administration, rights for LGBT individuals and families may come under threat. We discuss the status of current state and federal rights for LGBT citizens, and look at what battles might be ahead. With us is Atlanta-based LGBT activist Robbie Medwed, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Reporter Kristina Torres, and Lila Bradley, family law attorney at Claiborne Fox Bradley LLC.

Thomas Hawk / Foter

When you watch any high-profile awards ceremony, like the Oscars or the Emmys, you go in knowing a lot of it will be Hollywood fluff. But at least with those, you’re fairly confident that quality films and TV will be recognized.

 

 

That, unfortunately, is not the case with the Grammys. While the Emmys, for example, have rightfully helped put series like "Breaking Bad" or "Game of Thrones" in the history books of quality shows, the Grammys tend to write the wrong history.

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