Trevor Young

On Second Thought Producer

Trevor Young currently works as a Producer for "On Second Thought" with Celeste Headlee at Georgia Public Broadcasting. 

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of Wayne Kramer

Wayne Kramer co-founded the Detroit band Motor City Five back in 1967. The group, better known as MC5, ultimately disbanded in 1973. But Wayne continued playing and has remained a politically vocal artist. He’ll be in Georgia this weekend performing at CBGB Athens, a benefit for homeless veterans in the state. All proceeds from that show will also go to homeless veterans.

First, as natural predators of insects, bats are extremely important to agriculture. Researchers estimate their value to farmers in the U.S. is roughly $23 billion per year, but these are tough times for bats. A malignant fungus known as "white-nose syndrome" has killed a lot of bats over the past 10 years. We talk about this menace with wildlife pathologist Heather Fenton of the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study and Georgia State University microbiologist Chris Cornelison.

Kevin O'Mara / Flickr

Five rural hospitals closed their doors between 2013 and 2016, and many more face potential financial collapse. One effort to help curb the problem of rural health care access is the Two Georgias initiative. That program is a collaboration between healthcare providers across the state, designed to expand access to quality health care in rural parts of Georgia.

Antrell Williams / Foter

Georgia led the nation with the highest increase in personal auto insurance rates in 2016, according to a new analysis from S&P Global Market Intelligence. Though Georgia has held a top spot in insurance rate boosts over the years, outgoing Insurance Commissioner Ralph Hudgens has said he does not plan to take action.

First, Sweetwater Mission is Atlanta’s largest food pantry, and it focuses on the city’s undocumented workers. Managers at the mission say they recently turned down $35,000 of funding because it came with the stipulation that it should only be used to serve people who are in the country legally. Joining us is the Director of Operations for Sweetwater Mission, Mark Zangari, and Solveig Cunningham professor at the Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University.

David Goldman / AP Photo

The number of high-poverty neighborhoods in the metro Atlanta area tripled between 2000 and 2015. That’s according to a new Harvard study, which finds poverty is largely moving to the suburbs surrounding the city. We talk about this with Kim Addie, Senior Director of Health for United Way of Atlanta.

coolloud / Flickr

"Wonder Woman" became the highest grossing box office film this summer. And the movie "Girls Trip," which features an all-female cast, was second at the box office the weekend before last. Finally, women are taking the leads in films and in television.

First, the number of high-poverty neighborhoods in the metro Atlanta area tripled between 2000 and 2015. That’s according to a new Harvard study, which finds poverty is largely moving to the suburbs surrounding the city. We talk about this with Kim Addie, Senior Director of Health for United Way of Atlanta. Michael Rich, a Professor in the Department of Political Science at Emory University, also joins us.

David Goldman / AP Photo

The Georgia House of Representatives had more uncontested seats in the last election cycle than any legislative chamber in the nation. Nearly all incumbents retained their seats. Only 31 of the 180 House seats featured candidates from both parties—leaving 83 percent of all seats uncontested. Andra Gillespie weighs in on why incumbents rule in Georgia. She’s a Political Science Professor at Emory University.

First, 50,000 Fulton County voters received letters saying they may be declared inactive, because they didn’t update the address on their voter registration cards. The Georgia ACLU is threatening legal action against the state, claiming it’s actions are in violation of the Voter Registration Act of 1993. But is this simple housekeeping for an elections system, or part of an effort to make it harder for some people to vote? Joining us is Andra Gillespie, Emory University Political Science Professor.

Don Smith / GPB

We hope you heard our broadcast from the Historic Douglass Theatre. We celebrated Macon’s musical talent with a live audience. Our opening act was the current generation of that talent – teens who completed this year’s Otis Music Camp for young musicians. Listen to the highlights on this post, or see the whole performance here

Don Smith / GPB

Macon, Georgia has a rich heritage, once home to great musicians like The Allman Brothers, Little Richard, and Otis Redding. The Douglass Theatre in Macon helped to launch the career of Redding and countless other musicians of color. In celebration on Bragg Jam, "On Second Thought" taps into that history, joined at the Douglass by local guests making strides in Macon.

First, a recent report puts Georgia 41st in the nation for its quality of senior health. According to America’s Health Rankings Senior Report, that’s two slots lower than last year. We talk about senior health in the state with Kathy Floyd of the Georgia Council on Aging and Glenn Osster of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Georgia.

Atlanta band Manchester Orchestra has been going strong since 2004, having performed at big festivals like Shaky Knees, Lollapalooza, and Bonnaroo. But the band reached a new peak in fame after scoring the 2016 cult film “Swiss Army Man” with Daniel Radcliffe and Paul Dano. 

Jason Thrasher

All this week we get additions to the essential Georgia Playlist from musicians playing at Bragg Jam in Macon this weekend, July 28-29. The series is produced by GPB’s Trevor Young. Today’s picks come from Vanessa Briscoe Hay, former frontwoman for the legendary Athens band Pylon.

First, a new report from the Centers for Disease Control shows that 30 million Americans -- nearly 10 percent of the population -- have diabetes. The study also shows nearly a quarter of them -- more than seven million -- are undiagnosed. And the South, Georgia included, has the highest concentration of people with the disease. We talk with Sarah Piper, Senior Program Associate for the Diabetes Training and Technical Assistance Center at Emory University and Andy Miller, President of Georgia Health News.

Courtesy of Mike Savino

All this week we get additions to the essential Georgia Playlist from musicians playing at Bragg Jam in Macon this weekend, July 28-29. Today’s picks come from banjoist Mike Savino, also known as Tall Tall Trees. He’s performed with groups like Of Montreal and Kishi Bashi. He brings us music from Jerry Reid and R.E.M.

Tall Tall Trees' Bragg Jam performance will be at the Bearfoot Beer Garden this Saturday at 8:30 p.m.

drivebybiscuits1 / Foter

Wesleyan College in Macon is looking to apologize for past ties to racism, slavery, and the Ku Klux Klan. Information about the school’s history came to light recently through the research of students at Wesleyan. This comes just months after an incident involving racist graffiti on a dorm room wall.

First, the fate of the police department in the small town of Varnell in Whitfield County is suddenly uncertain. Earlier this month, the city council voted to eliminate the department because of costs, with little warning. The mayor ultimately vetoed that move, but the council could override that veto on Tuesday. We talk with reporter Chris Whitfield, who has been covering this story for The Daily Citizen in Dalton.

First, the Atlanta City Council, along with the United Way, has committed $50 million  to help combat homelessness. This comes after news that the city’s largest shelter, Peachtree-Pine, will close by the end of August. Joining us is Rick Westbrook, Executive Director for Lost N Found, and Deirdre Oakley, Professor of Sociology for Georgia State University.

First, another round of allegations have surfaced against musician R. Kelly. Now, parents have claimed their daughters are being held captive by the hip-hop musician, living in homes he rents out in Atlanta and Chicago, with almost every aspect of their lives controlled. R. Kelly publicly denies these allegations. Jim DeRogatis broke the story earlier this week. He’s a Buzzfeed contributor, host of WBEZ’s "Sound Opinions," and our guest.

Frank Micelotta/Invision / AP Photo

Another round of allegations have surfaced against musician R. Kelly. Now, parents have claimed their daughters are being held captive by the musician, living in homes he rents out in Atlanta and Chicago, with almost every aspect of their lives controlled. R. Kelly publicly denies these allegations. Jim DeRogatis broke the story earlier this week. He’s a Buzzfeed contributor, host of WBEZ’s "Sound Opinions," and our guest. 

First, one of the first African-American elementary schools in Atlanta was recently slated for destruction. But after outcry a piece of the structure was saved, to become part of a new YMCA center in Vine City. This is just one fight in a perennial battle over historic preservation. A recent National Trust for Historic Preservation study says Atlanta has a  teardown culture -- worse than just about about any other major American city. We talk about this with Sheffield Hale, President of the Atlanta History Center. And with Mtamanika Youngblood, President of Sweet Auburn Works.

We talk with actor Tony Hale, best known for roles on "Veep" and "Arrested Development." He stars in the movie, "Brave New Jersey." It’s showing at this week’s Macon Film Festival, July 20-23.

Then, 21 years have passed since Atlanta became an Olympic city. The games were transformative. For a look back, we re-visit a conversation we had with former NPR correspondent Kathy Lohr and Georgia State University professor Maurice Hobson.

David Goldman / AP Photo

The Atlanta Regional Commission predicts Gwinnett County will become Georgia’s most populous county by the year 2040, outpacing Fulton county with nearly 1.4 million residents. The county is launching a study to create a comprehensive transportation plan for the area.

Federal prosecutors are investigating bribes paid to Atlanta city officials in exchange for business contracts. Two contractors have already plead guilty to dishing out these bribes--though it is not clear who accepted them. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has exclusive new info on the situation. We talk with reporter Scott Trubey, who has been covering the bribery scandal at City Hall.

Then, Kaleb Anderson is a 19 year-old-from Atlanta. He was diagnosed with HIV just a couple of months before starting college. He shares his story in a commentary.

Wally Gobetz / Flickr

Federal prosecutors are investigating bribes paid to Atlanta city officials in exchange for business contracts. Two contractors have already plead guilty to dishing out these bribes--though it is not clear who accepted them. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has exclusive new info on the situation. We talk with reporter Scott Trubey, who has been covering the bribery scandal at City Hall.

Courtney McDermott

Athens band Five Eight has been a staple in the Georgia music scene for decades. An upcoming documentary called “Weirdo: The Story of Five Eight” follows the band’s return to glory. This week, the group premieres their new double record “Songs for St. Jude." Five Eight members Mike Mantione and Sean Dunn join us from Athens.

A report released last month provides a grim picture on the effects of gun violence on children. Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta found nearly 1,300 children in the United States die in shootings each year. That makes gunshot wounds the third leading cause of death for children up to the age of 17. We talk with Atlanta-based trauma surgeon Omar Danner, who worked on a separate report about the victims of gun violence admitted to Grady Hospital.

The Killer Tomato is this coming weekend. The Killer Tomato Festival, that is. Atlanta restaurateur and chef Ford Fry and Georgia Organics Director Alice Rolls join us to talk about southern cooking with juicy, ripe tomatoes. Then, Bitter Southerner editor-in-chief Chuck Reece provides his views on how to construct the perfect tomato sandwich.

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