Trevor Young

On Second Thought Producer

Trevor Young currently works as a Producer for "On Second Thought" with Celeste Headlee at Georgia Public Broadcasting. 

Ways to Connect

Richard Drew / AP Photo

The American economy has seen more volatility under the Trump administration than any other recent president. It remains to be seen what kind of long-term effects Trump’s presidency will have on the job market in Georgia, and the global economic landscape. We talk business with Marilyn Geewax, Senior Business Editor and Economics Correspondent for NPR.

Jason Thrasher

Among the legendary music acts to come out of Athens in the ‘70s and '80s was the band Pylon. The group had been a local mainstay until 2009, when guitarist Randall Bewley passed away. But singer Vanessa Briscoe Hay recently revived the band into the newly formed Pylon Reenactment Society. They have a new EP, called “Part Time Punks Session,” coming out this fall.

Among the legendary music acts to come out of Athens in the ‘70s was the band Pylon. The group had been a local mainstay until 2009, when guitarist Randall Bewley passed away. But singer Vanessa Briscoe Hay recently revived the band into the newly formed Pylon Reenactment Society. They have a new EP, called “Part Time Punks Session,” coming out this fall. We talk with Vanessa Briscoe Hay and drummer Joe Rowe about the new music.

Southern food has a history as rich as its taste. Whether it's red beans and rice, fried chicken, biscuits or potlikker, the history of Southern food stretches from slave plantations, to the Montgomery Bus Boycott, to our own kitchens today. We talk about the origins of our favorite Southern dishes with culinary historian John T. Edge of the Southern Foodways Alliance. He is the author of the new book, “The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South.”

Oliver Noble / Vice

This summer, 27 so-called "micronations" gathered in Dunwoody, Georgia for MicroCon 2017. A micronation is defined as a small, self-proclaimed entity which claims to be an independent sovereign state, but is not acknowledged as such by any recognized sovereign state, or by any supranational organization. Vice News produced a documentary from the convention, which featured many micronations based within Georgia. We get the inside scoop from Vice Media Video Producer Oliver Noble.

This summer, 27 so-called micronations gathered in Dunwoody, Georgia for MicroCon 2017. A micronation is defined as a small, self-proclaimed entity which claims to be an independent sovereign state, but is not acknowledged as such by any recognized sovereign state, or by any supranational organization. Vice News produced a documentary from the convention, which featured many micronations based within Georgia. We get the inside scoop from Vice Media Video Producer Oliver Noble.

Meet The Press / NBC

This past weekend, former Atlanta mayor and U.N. ambassador Andrew Young appeared on NBC’s "Meet The Press" with Chuck Todd. Following the interview, many civil rights activists criticized Young for some of his comments. We get reactions from local leaders, including Reverend Gerald Durley, LGBT activist Monica Helms, and Creative Currents Executive Director Oronike Odeleye.

Branden Camp / AP Photo

Morris Publishing announced this month it would sell ownership of 11 daily newspapers in the Southeast to Gatehouse Media. The sale includes large local Georgia papers like the Augusta Chronicle, the Athens Banner-Herald, and the Savannah Morning News. We talk about what’s behind the sale with Carolyn Carlson, a Professor of Communications and Media at Kennesaw State University. And Phil Kent, CEO of Insider Advantage, and a former editor at the Augusta Chronicle.

Morris Publishing announced this month it would sell ownership of 11 daily newspapers in the Southeast to Gatehouse Media. The sale includes large local Georgia papers like the Augusta Chronicle, the Athens Banner-Herald, and the Savannah Morning News. We talk about what’s behind the sale with Carolyn Carlson, a Professor of Communications and Media at Kennesaw State University. And Phil Kent, CEO of Insider Advantage, and a former editor at the Augusta Chronicle.

For the first time in over four decades, West Point authorized an updated text on military history in 2014. This one focuses on the tactics and consequences of the Civil War. We revisit a conversation with Colonel Ty Seidule, one of the book’s editors.

The Darlington School

Nine Georgia men have filed a lawsuit against the Darlington School in Rome, alleging sexual abuse by former teacher Roger Stifflemore. The case has caused state lawmakers to propose expanding the Hidden Predator Act to give more time for victims to sue their abusers, and also allow them to sue institutions.

About 30 years ago, the “Brotherman” comic series paved the way for today’s black comics and superhero movement. Atlanta-based artist Dawud Anyabwile is the co-creator of Brotherman. We talk with him about a new exhibit in Atlanta chronicling Brotherman’s universe.

It’s been two weeks since the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. The violence there renewed conversations about race relations, and have left some searching for answers on how to de-radicalize people. That’s something Shannon Martinez of Athens knows firsthand. She was a skinhead for several years, but managed to leave that life behind her.  We talk with her and Sammy Rangel of Life After Hate, a group that helps people move away from hate and violent extremism.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Atlanta Theater Director Kenny Leon has produced theater versions of “The Wiz,” "Hairspray," and “Fences.” He also founded Atlanta's True Colors Theatre Company. Now, Leon is set to teach master classes on film and theater production at Kennesaw State University. Kenny Leon joins us in the studio to discuss teaching and his latest work.

Mark Fischer / Foter

For centuries, groups in the South have sought to secede from the United States. More than 150 years after the Civil War, groups like the League of the South are pushing again to break from the Union. We talk about how serious we should take calls for secession with Roxanne Donovan, Psychology Professor at Kennesaw State University. And Trey Hood, Political Science Professor at the University of Georgia in Athens.

Foter

The South is a proud place. Southerners are notorious for their love of their heritage and culture. But following the events in Charlottesville, Virginia, it’s becoming more difficult to separate the South from its roots in racism and white supremacy.

For centuries, groups in the South have sought to secede from the United States. More than 150 years after the Civil War, groups like the League of the South are pushing again to break from the Union. We talk about how serious we should take calls for secession with Roxanne Donovan, Psychology Professor at Kennesaw State University. And Trey Hood, Political Science Professor at the University of Georgia in Athens.

First, Atlanta has a healthy appetite for improv. This week Dad’s Garage Theater welcomes Scott Adsit. You may know him best as Pete Hornberger on the show “30 Rock.” Scott joined us earlier this week to discuss the art of comedy.

Then, Atlanta-based producer Will Packer’s new movie “Girls Trip” is doing quite well. It cost about $19 million to make, and it’s grossed more than $90 million since opening in theaters last month. We talked with Will Packer last week about making hit movies with diverse casts, and his television project “Black America.”

First, rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend brought together many factions of the white supremacist movement, and put a younger generation of white supremacists in the spotlight. Reporter A.C. Thompson has been tracking hate groups for ProPublica’s “Documenting Hate” project. He joins us to talk about his reporting, and what he saw in Virginia. We also talk with University of Maryland psychology professor Arie Kruglanski, who studies the mental processes behind radicalization, de-radicalization, and terrorism.

Music for American films is produced almost entirely in New York or Los Angeles. But as the film industry booms in Georgia, the demand for locally sourced musicians is growing. The newly formed Peach State Orchestra looks to meet that demand by becoming the first premiere movie scoring orchestra in Georgia. We talk with founder and conductor Phillip Allen.

“Shadow Of The Lions” is the debut novel of Atlanta author Christopher Swann. His thriller novel explores the life of a young man named Matthias as he reckons with the disappearance of a close friend. Christopher Swann is an English Professor at Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School, and our guest.

Chris Swann will appear at the Atlanta History Center on Thursday, August 17 at 7 p.m.

First, a new report finds chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in 110 of 111 brains of deceased former NFL players. The study adds to a  growing body of knowledge about the connection between contact sports and brain-damaging concussions. We talk with Steve Broglio, Director of the NeuroTrauma Research Laboratory at the University of Michigan.

We also talk with former Atlanta Falcons linebacker Buddy Curry, who is working to improve football education with his group, “Kids & Pros.”

When Donald Trump began his campaign in 2015, few thought he would climb to the nation’s highest office. But Jared Yates Sexton realized Trump was onto something. He was one of the first people to attend and report on Trump rallies. Sexton teaches creative writing at Georgia Southern University, and has a new book: “The People Are Going To Rise Like The Waters Upon Your Shore.” He joins us for an hour exploring changes in the American psyche.

When Donald Trump began his campaign in 2015, few thought he would climb to the nation’s highest office. But Jared Yates Sexton realized Trump was onto something. He was one of the first people to attend and report on Trump rallies. Sexton teaches creative writing at Georgia Southern University, and has a new book: “The People Are Going To Rise Like The Waters Upon Your Shore.” He joins us to explore the changes in the American psyche leading up to Trump.

Alik Keplicz / AP Photo

Donald Trump’s politics have often been described as “populist.” Populism, by definition, is the belief that average people should have more say in governance than the wealthy elite. But the term can be as misleading; Bernie Sanders was also called a populist. Since the word can cause some confusion, we break it down. Then we’re joined by a populism expert: Cas Mudde, a professor in the Department of International Affairs at the University of Georgia. And Jared Yates Sexton, a professor at Georgia Southern University.

Steve Helber / AP Photo

Since the November election, the political drama in America has only heightened. Carol Anderson is a professor of African-American Studies at Emory University. Her latest book, “White Rage,” points to racial tensions as a cause of growing division. We assemble a panel to discuss what has changed since Trump took office, and how Americans are shifting their views. Also with us is Bret Stephens, conservative columnist for the New York Times. And Jared Yates Sexton, author and a professor of writing at Georgia Southern University.

First, if you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on TV’s “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” and he has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. Audiences in Atlanta can see him live Friday, August 11, and tomorrow August 12 at Dad’s Garage. We talk with Colin Mochrie.

Bob Gruen

We add a couple more tunes to the Georgia Playlist, our essential list of songs that best represent Georgia. Today we feature Athens-band Shehehe, who release a new album, called “Endless Summer,” this weekend [August 12]. Drummer and singer Jason Fusco brings us his picks for the Georgia Playlist, including tunes by The Glands and Illegal Drugs.

Shehehe performs at the 40 Watt in Athens this Saturday at 9 p.m.

First, imagine being in outer space with two sassy robots, and being forced to watch really bad science fiction movies with them. That’s the premise of the cult classic TV series, Mystery Science Theater 3000. The show is on the road this weekend [August 12] in Atlanta. We talk with series creator, Joel Hodgson.

David McClister

Country artist Lucinda Williams first achieved commercial breakthrough with her 1998 album, “Car Wheels on a Gravel Road.” She’s won three Grammy Awards, and was named one of the greatest country artists of all time by Rolling Stone magazine this year. Now, she’s on tour promoting her 12th studio album, “The Ghosts of Highway 20,” which reflects on her time living in Georgia. 

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